Kamis, 31 Januari 2013

How to Test a Mass Air Flow Sensor on a 1990 Mazda MPV

How to Test a Mass Air Flow Sensor on a 1990 Mazda MPV

The mass airflow sensor, or MAF for short, is part of the computerized operating system of an engine. The sensor is located between the throttle body and the airbox. A six wire removable connector interfaces with the computer. The MAF measures the quantity of air entering the throttle body of the engine, converts it to a voltage signal and then sends that signal to the computer. Proper injector pulse width, spark timing and other factors are made using this input. The MAF plays an important role in the proper operation of the motor.

Instructions

Preparation to test the MAF

    1

    Locate the MAF and carefully remove it from the intake hose. Check the screen on the front of the sensor and gently remove and debris. Inspect the bore and remove any dust or oily buildup. Don't touch the hairlike platinum wire inside the bore, as it is delicate. Look to make sure it is clean. A dirty wire can indicate a broken burn off circuit.

    2

    Carefully remove the six terminal connector. Examine the connector for any broken or loose wires and corrosion. Both male and female ends of the recepticles should be clean and shiny. Clean the wires to expose the color shading, remove the protective rubber boot and and reassemble. Reinsert the MAF back into the air duct and properly secure.

    3

    Acquaint yourself with the wire colors and their function according to the following chart:

    TERMINAL

    B/Y (Power supply)

    G/O (Burn-off)

    G/B (Air flow mass)

    G/Y (Ground)

    B/O (Ground)

    4

    Set the voltmeter on the 12 volt DC scale. Locate a good ground for the negative wire and place a back probe on the positive side. With the ignition on, back probing each colored wire should give the following results:

    B/Y - Approx. 12V

    G/O - 0V

    G/B - 1.0 - 2.0V

    G/Y - Approx. 0V

    B/O - Approx. 0V

    5

    Start the motor and let it idle. Continue the back probing on each wire and look for the following results:

    B/Y - Approx. 12V

    G/O - 0V

    G/B - 1.9 - 5.0V

    G/Y - Approx. 0V

    B/O - Approx. 0V

    Accelerating the engine from idle will change the voltage on the G/B circuit.

    6

    Backprobe the G/O, or burn off circuit while the motor is idling. Shut of the engine and observe the voltmeter. A four second 12 volt signal indicates the burn off mode is functioning. It is designed to heat the platinum wire to burn off any residue. If the MAF fails any of the above tests, replace it.

Problems With Front Brake Wear

Problems With Front Brake Wear

The front brakes on your vehicle are responsible for providing the majority of your stopping power. Sometimes vehicles have problems with their front brakes, including the brakes not wearing properly. If your car's brakes aren't wearing the way they should be, there's probably a problem somewhere in the car that needs to be repaired. Brakes not wearing properly are normally a symptom of a related issue rather than a problem with the brakes themselves.

Brakes Wear Too Quickly

    Several major brands of vehicles, most notably Honda, have had issues where the brakes in the vehicles wear out too quickly. Brakes wear out too quickly if the brake pads aren't large enough to properly support stopping the weight of the car or if the brake pads aren't made of a sturdy-enough material. Some brake pads are simply softer than others --- these brake pads may wear out sooner than you'd expect.

Brakes Wear Unevenly

    Uneven brake wear is commonly caused by a problem in your braking system that is causing brake pressure to be unevenly divided between your front brakes. Uneven wear on your brakes means that the hardware on one side of your brakes will wear out and need to be replaced before the other side does. A warped brake rotor is a common cause of uneven brake wear.

Other Causes of Brake Wear

    There are a number of different factors that can cause your vehicle's front brakes not to wear properly. Problems in the braking system, for instance, can cause your brakes to wear out more quickly because they're putting extra pressure on the other brake components. High temperatures can also cause your brake pads to wear out more rapidly than cooler temperatures. Routinely driving on steep terrain, such as if you live in a mountainous area, can cause your brakes to wear out more frequently, as can regularly towing and stopping with heavy loads.

    If you're consistently having problems with the way your brakes wear and none of these factors apply to you, you may be driving your car too hard and abusing your brakes. Constant heavy brake use by a driver can cause your brakes to wear out faster than they should.

Temporary Fixes for Radiators

Vehicle radiators typically cost several hundred dollars to replace, and depending on where you live and what kind of vehicle you have, it may even take a few days for your new radiator to arrive after it has been ordered. Sometimes people find themselves in the position of making a temporary repair or using a quick fix on their radiator, ensuring that their vehicle will continue to operate until the replacement part arrives or they can afford the repair costs.

Radiator Flush

    Radiator clogs are caused by sludge and general debris that build up in your radiator over time. As the clogs grow in size, they can keep coolant from properly circulating and cause your vehicle to overheat. Normally, its is best to replace a clogged radiator with a new one, however, you may be able to extend the life of your radiator by using a radiator flush on it. Radiator fushes are specially designed to dissolve clogs in your radiator and extend the life of the part.

Stopping Leaks

    There are a number of products on the market that have been designed to stop your radiator from leaking. Radiator coolant leaks occur for a number of reasons, including small holes in the radiator and weak seals on your cooling system. Putting a leak-stopping product into your radiator may help stop the leak for a short amount of time, however, it is only a temporary repair. You will still need to replace your radiator in the near future.

Low-Pressure Radiator Cap

    A low-pressure radiator cap is designed to produce less pressure in your cooling system than your traditional radiator cap. If your system is operating under less pressure, it may not cool as well, but it may help it keep cooling somewhat while you get your vehicle to the repair shop.

Rabu, 30 Januari 2013

Camry Diagnosis Codes

Camry Diagnosis Codes

A Toyota Camry has a variety of diagnostic systems at work within the vehicle. Each of these systems interact with sensors, and catalog malfunctions as they occur. The system in question assigns these faults codes. The diagnostic system activates a warning light on the Camry's instrument cluster if the issues persist.

On Board Diagnostics, Second Generation (OBD-II)

    The OBD-II system covers the Camry's engine, fuel system, emissions, electronics, network communications and the body itself. The codes are alpha-numeric sequences that begin with either P, B, C, or U. Two sets of OBD-II codes exist for the Camry; a generic set is used by all OBD-II compliant vehicles. Toyota also has a separate set.

Anti-Lock Brakes System

    The OBD-II system covers some of the Camry's brakes, but not all of them. The ABS system has its own diagnostic regime, which corresponds to a warning light independent of Camry's "check engine" light. These codes are only numeric, and accessing them requires a separate scanner. An OBD-II scanner can not read ABS codes.

Other Diagnostic Systems

    ABS and OBD-II codes tend to be the most widely used; they are frequently accessed by a home mechanic. The Department of Transportation required all new vehicles to be equipped with a Tire Pressure Monitoring System in 2008. Scanners for this system are not widely available as of 2011.The Camry's air bag system also has a separate set of codes; this is not a diagnostic piece of hardware intended for the home mechanic.

Accessing Codes

    Toyota Camrys manufactured after 1996 are equipped with an outlet known as a Data Link Connector. The Camry's DLC is located under the dash and above the brake pedal. All scanners connect to their respective diagnostic system through this outlet. Consult each particular scanner for operational directions.

How to Troubleshoot a Motor Capacitor

How to Troubleshoot a Motor Capacitor

Motor capacitors are an integral component to electric motors, provide a current to the windings of a motor in an alternating fashion, creating a rotational magnetic field. These motors can be found in many everyday appliances and machinery, including washing machines, vacuum cleaners and air conditioning units. Troubleshooting the motor capacitor is a key step in repairing any electric motor.

Instructions

    1

    Disconnect the motor capacitor from its motor leads and remove from the motor housing.

    2

    Connect the motor capacitor in series with the 10-amp fuse and 110 volt power line. If the fuse burns out when connected, the capacitor has a dead short and must be replaced. If the fuse does not burn out, leave the line connected for a few seconds to build up a charge in the capacitor.

    3

    Disconnect the charged capacitor from the 10-amp fuse and 110 volt power line with caution.

    4

    Discharge the capacitor by shorting its two terminals together with the large screwdriver with insulated handle. A good, strong spark should appear, indicating that the motor capacitor is operating properly. A weak or no spark indicates a damaged motor capacitor and must be replaced.

Selasa, 29 Januari 2013

My 2000 Ford F150 Won't Start

My 2000 Ford F150 Won't Start

If your 2000 Ford F150 isn't starting, there could be several reasons. Diagnosing the problem is a process of elimination, discovering which potential problems are not causing your truck's current condition in order to find out which one is. The most likely causes for your truck not to start are problems with the starter, the battery, or the fuel; though several other potential problems exist if none of these seem to be the cause.

Instructions

Battery or Starter

    1

    Listen for an attempt for the starter to engage. If your problem is the battery, this will sound like your truck's normal starting sound, but more sluggish and lacking power, then petering out. Each subsequent attempt to start the engine will produce less and less of the sound, indicating a further draining of the battery. In some cases if the battery is already completely drained, you'll hear nothing but a click, or nothing at all.

    2

    Charge the battery by either hooking it up to a battery charger or jumping it using jumper cables attached to another vehicle.

    3

    Have the battery tested. If it isn't holding a charge, replace it. If it is holding a charge, there could be a problem with your alternator, the part of your truck which charges the battery when the engine is running.

    4

    Listen for a grinding sound when engaging the ignition. This indicates that the starter is worn and not working properly, and must be rebuilt or replaced.

Vacuum Hoses

    5

    Listen for your engine to start but stop immediately. This could indicate a leak in the intake manifold vacuum hoses.

    6

    Check all vacuum hoses and connections for leaks or loose connectors. A loose connection can allow air into the system and prevent the engine from compressing correctly.

    7

    Replace any that appear worn or broken. If the truck still won't run properly, the problem may lie with the fuel injection or fuel pressure.

Fuel or Fuel Pump

    8

    Listen for an attempt for the engine to start as normal but won't start. This could mean that either the fuel tank is empty, the fuel in the tank is bad, or somehow the fuel is not getting to the injectors in order for it to spark.

    9

    Check the fuel level in the tank by turning the key to the on position but not starting it. If the needle on the fuel gauge doesn't rise, there's a high probability that the reason your truck isn't starting is because there's no fuel. If the fuel level is at any other level, your problem lies elsewhere.

    10

    Check your fuel pump and filter. If the fuel pump isn't working, fuel won't be getting to the engine. Replacing the fuel pump will solve the problem. If the fuel pump is working properly, check the fuel filter. A clogged fuel filter could also prevent fuel from getting to the engine.

    11

    Check the fuel. If water or other contaminants have gotten into the fuel, it will keep the fuel from being able to spark. Drain your fuel tank and fill it with new fuel.

Subaru Impreza Clutch Problems

The Subaru Impreza was introduced in 1993; it is a compact car available in four-door sedan and five-door hatchback. Edmunds.com reports that the Impreza is an above-average compact car with four-wheel drive and an impressive powertrain.

Clutch Sticking

    Subaru Technical Service Bulletins indicate that the main clutch issue with the Subaru Impreza is clutch "sticking." A sticking clutch occurs when the clutch pedal does not release after you press it down. A sticking clutch TSB is reported for every model year from 1997 to 2003.

Causes

    The primary cause of a sticking clutch is a clutch master cylinder that lacks brake fluid. A clutch master cylinder in need of fluid will not provide the pedal with enough hydraulic pressure to release itself once pressed. A less common cause is a leaking clutch master cylinder.

Solution

    Your first repair option is adding break fluid to the clutch master cylinder reservoir. If problems persist, check to see if the clutch master cylinder is leaking. A leaking clutch master cylinder has to be completely drained and replaced.

Senin, 28 Januari 2013

My 1995 Chevy 4x4 Won't Engage

Four-wheel drive on a Chevy can be beneficial for extra traction in slippery conditions. The transfer case has multiple settings that can be used in different scenarios. Two-wheel drive is used for dry pavement, the "Neutral" position can be used when the Chevy is being towed and four-wheel-drive low is a good option for steep slopes, mud, sand and heavy snow. Four-wheel-drive high ("4HI") is good for slippery conditions. Problems shifting into "4HI" with the Chevy's electronic transfer case control can be rectified.

Instructions

    1

    Press the button marked "4H" on the electronic transfer case control on the dash at any speed (if you're in "2HI") and the front axle will lock automatically. Proceed in "4HI."

    2

    Stop, or move at less than 3 mph, to shift from "4LO" to "4HI" by pressing the "4HI" button. The shift won't work at higher speeds (this is normal). Engage the clutch, or place the transmission in "Neutral" while shifting. Wait for the "4HI" light to stop flashing before releasing the clutch or moving out of "Neutral."

    3

    Make temporary adjustments to the switch if you still can't shift into "4HI" and your transmission is automatic. Press and release the "4HI" switch with the gears in "Neutral." Then, while the "4HI" indicator is flashing, move the transmission into "Park" and wait for the "4H" light to remain illuminated. Then shift into a gear.

What Happens When Your Transmission Goes Out?

What Happens When Your Transmission Goes Out?

Transmission problems may put you and your passengers at risk if you do not know what to expect when your transmission goes out. The transmission controls the transfer of engine power to the drive wheels and allows the driver to change gears and control speed. When a transmission goes out, vehicle handling and performance may be affected. Learn how to identify transmission problems, the steps you can take for your vehicle now and how to prevent transmission problems in the future.

Causes

    Overheating is one of the most common causes of transmission failure, which may occur because of a car pulling a heavy load (such as a trailer), driving in snowy conditions or stop-and-go traffic in excessive heat. When the transmission temperature rises, the fluid burns and begins to lose its lubricating qualities. When this happens, the transmission hardens and becomes prone to leaks, which cause transmission failure. Your transmission may also stop working because of poor automotive design, poor maintenance, wrong fluid type or harsh driving.

Leakage

    If your transmission stops working, you may notice leaking under the car. Transmission fluid is a reddish transparent color, which makes it easy to spot. A faulty transmission may leak fluid that is cloudy, brown or has a burnt odor. To prevent further damage to your transmission, check your fluid level often until you are able to visit your local auto repair shop or transmission facility. Read your car's manual to be sure on how to check transmission fluid levels. Typically, it will involve pulling out the transmission dipstick to get a reading on fluid levels. Make sure to have your transmission looked at before the fluid levels dip too low, or you risk further damage to your transmission.

Performance

    When your transmission goes out, your car's handling will be affected. You may experience vibrations, slippage (engine revs but vehicle does not accelerate as it should) or different shift patterns in your vehicle. The gear shift on your car will stop working when the transmission dies. This may be caused by a bad fluid pump in the transmission, which can lead to total gear breakdown. Typically, an automatic car should shift smoothly and soundlessly; if your car makes noises while shifting or you begin to feel a vibration, this indicates a transmission problem. Bring your car to your local mechanic or auto repair shop to have your transmission checked out or repaired.

Prevention

    Prevent transmission failure by regularly checking your transmission for leaks. If you catch a problem in time you will be able to prevent complete transmission failure. Manually check or bring your car to a mechanic to have him check your transmission levels so your fluid levels are always maintained. Bring your car in for regular repairs to have the fluid changed when it becomes dark or cloudy in color. Make sure you are using the proper transmission fluid for your car, as specified in your vehicle owner's manual. When driving, avoid frequent stopping and starting. Make sure the car has come to a full stop before shifting to the parking gear.

What Would Make a Car Stall When You Stop & Go?

Random stalling is often the first sign of trouble for fuel-injected engines, particularly where sensor problems are concerned. Electronically controlled engines are very sensitive to sensor and component feedback input, and may get a bit confused when an engine's physical actions don't line up with what the sensors are saying.

Throttle Position Sensor

    A bad or maladjusted throttle position sensor will trick your engine into thinking that there's more air going into the engine than there is. While ultimate responsibility for airflow detection almost always falls to the mass-air and manifold air pressure sensors, most computers default to the throttle position sensor during transitional periods. If the TPS tells your computer that the throttle blades are still open, it'll cut signal to the idle air control valve and cause the engine to either choke out or go lean when the throttle rapidly opens or closes.

Dirty Throttle Body

    Positive crankcase ventilation systems use engine vacuum to suck high-pressure gases out of the crankcase and duct them into the engine. A valve on the valve cover or in the hose keeps engine oil out of the hose and, subsequently, the engine. The PCV hose usually connects up-stream of the throttle body, and because air pressurizes on the throttle blades, oil in the air stream will typically condense on the insides of the throttle body. This wet oil is a magnet for dust, dirt and junk, and will eventually burn off to leave a charcoal-like deposit behind. These deposits can block the idle air-control valve passages and throttle body walls, which has the same basic effect as a bad TPS.

Temperature Sensor

    Computerized engines typically use input from the temperature sensor to adjust air-to-fuel ratio. A malfunctioning temperature sensor will trick the computer into thinking that the engine's running much hotter of colder than it really is, which affects how it controls air-to-fuel ratio. This change in air-to-fuel ratio might not even be noticeable under normal operating conditions, but it gets more pronounced when the throttle blades are barely open. Once the throttle blades shut, the computer has control over not only fuel injection timing, but also airflow through the IAC, which means that it can kill the engine at will.

Unmetered Air and Fuel

    Vacuum leaks can cause stalling under deceleration or acceleration, but will typically manifest as hesitation or a rough idle the rest of the time. The IAC valve and fuel injection system might be able to compensate for a very small vacuum leak under steady-state conditions, but the system may not respond quickly enough during transitional periods to prevent stalling. The same goes for extremely low or high fuel pressure due to a malfunctioning pressure sensor, clogged filters or malfunctioning pump. Malfunctioning injectors will cause the same symptoms, but will typically only do so on one cylinder and will generally manifest under steady-state conditions as well.

1995 Jetta Manual Transmission Problems

1995 Jetta Manual Transmission Problems

Though Volkswagen has never issued a recall because of transmission problems with the 1995 Jetta, a number of owners have reported transmission issues. In particular, there have been reports of difficulty in shifting gears, difficulty in using reverse gear and complete transmission failure.

Transmission Shifting Problems

    Some users have found that their 1995 Volkswagen Jetta develops problems in shifting gears due to the wear on the gears in the transmission. This problem is particularly acute in cars that been driven long distances in short periods. It can be avoided if the owner maintains a preventive maintenance schedule. The Jetta owner should check the transmission fluid each time the operator refuels the Volkswagen to ensure that no signs of wear are showing up in the fluid. The transmission fluid should remain clear and not smell burned. If the transmission fluid smells burned, the transmission is running hotter than it should and needs to be changed as soon as possible. When the transmission gears begin to wear excessively, small particles can be seen in the transmission fluid.

Reverse Failure

    Many 1995 Volkswagen Jetta owners have experienced problems with the transmission not working when shifted into reverse. This problem can be attributed to the transmission linkages. When the linkages become worn, the first gears to be damaged are reverse and first gear. The only correction for this problem is to replace the transmission linkages, which should be done as soon as possible, since failing to do this will cause more damage can be done to the transmission. Changing linkages is a complicated process that should only be carried out be an experienced mechanic.

Transmission Failure

    Some 1995 Volkswagen Jetta owners have reported complete transmission failure in their vehicles. This is often caused by operating the vehicle with inadequate levels of transmission fluid. When the manual transmission is operated with low fluid levels it creates multiple problems including damage to the seals that prevent the fluid from leaking out through the vehicle's drive shaft. Once the transmission overheats damaging the seals. If this leakage occurs the transmission will run even hotter and wear the gears prematurely, causing transmission failure.

Minggu, 27 Januari 2013

Troubleshooting a 1985 Volvo 740

The Volvo 740 was an entry level Volvo that was basically a 760 but with less options. This made the car cheaper to build and more affordable for the masses. It was the first Volvo with forward wheel drive and marked a distinct shift in Volvo's marketing as they stopped going after the sport-minded customer (who prefers rear wheel drive cars). There are a number of issues that can creep up with a 1985 740, the suspension and the turbo are the most likely culprits.

Instructions

    1

    Walk around the exterior of the sedan first and inspect the body panels for corrosion and rust. Though Volvos are designed for winter weather and to resist the road salt and water, they can still get rust like any other car. Look under the car to inspect the 740's frame, look for any signs of rust or weld lines. If the 740 had been in a wreck then the frame would have weld lines where the frame was repaired. If the repair was done improperly then the frame could be off kilter.

    2

    Pop the hood of the 740 and look for any signs of damage on the engine. The air intake tube should be free of cracks or tears that would starve the engine of air. If the 740 is a turbo model then make sure the turbo housing is free from cracks or distortions. Inspect the Volvo's battery for any foam that would indicate battery damage. Have a mechanic replace any damaged batteries due to the risk of acid burns.

    3

    Turn the 740 on and let it idle. If the engine does not stay on then the fuel pump or the carburetor could be damaged. If it is the carburetor then it could be a simple valve replacement job but any problems with the fuel pump requires a full replacement of the pump.

    4

    Take the 740 for a test drive and watch the engine temperature. If it is running high the radiator may be damaged and it needs to have the fluid replaced. Listen to the gears change in the transmission, if you hear loud bangs then the transmission is starting to break and needs to be replaced soon. If you cannot shift into a certain gear, the gear could have broken or lost its teeth. The 740 can still be driven but the transmission needs to be rebuilt soon.

Problems With 10 Inch Scooter Tires

Problems With 10 Inch Scooter Tires

10-inch tires, describing the diameter of the inside rim of such tires, remain the stock tire size used on scooters, large engine and small. Usually about 3 to 3 1/2-inches wide, these tires are produced by most major tire brand manufacturers and can be found in most motorcycle stores. While these tires work well on the street, they have issues when used at higher speeds on the highways. 10-inch tires also develop problems when coupled with certain wheel rim types (i.e. tubeless rims versus split wheel rims with inner tubes).

Tire Performance Issues

    Due to the size of the ten inch tire it does not have sufficient contact space and mass to reliably perform at higher speeds, particularly those used on the highway. According to Motorcycle.com, the probability of speed wobbles is higher with a 10-inch tire than a bigger tire. A speed wobble can result in a significant accident and injury.

    Particularly during wet and rainy days, 10-inch tires have a very small contact space with the road. This can be problematic if the tire does not come with significant tread, as the tire will then slide when trying to stop.

Wheel Rim Problems

    Many 10-inch tires were originally installed on the scooter with split wheel rims. Using this method, the tire itself has an inner tube installed inside to trap air and pressure since a split tube would otherwise let the air out. A punctured inner tube generally causes the scooter to fall down in a moving accident.

Poor Tire Production Quality

    Tires of poor quality have a habit of drying out and cracking, particularly in regions with hot sun. The rubber loses integrity and eventually starts to tear apart under pressure.

How to Diagnose Ford Emissions With a Scan Tool

How to Diagnose Ford Emissions With a Scan Tool

In 1996, the Environmental Protection Agency standardized On-Board Diagnostics for all new vehicles. This universalized fault coding with a car's or light truck's powertrain control module. The intent went beyond merely putting a standard system in place for diagnostic fault coding. The OBD-II system held vehicle emissions to a single standard. For these reasons, diagnosing a Ford vehicle's emissions is a relatively easy task. All you need is an OBD-II compliant scanner

Instructions

    1

    Locate both generic and Ford-supplemental fault codes online. Print them out. Your scanner's handbook will have the generic codes, and a Ford-specific Haynes or Chilton repair manual will contain the supplemental codes. However, for the purpose of this task, it's easy to work with disposable copies. Pick up the printed material and attach to clipboard.

    2

    Flip through your printouts. Take a highlighter to all the fault codes dealing with the Ford's exhaust system. This would include fuel sensors and valves in places like the Exhaust Gas Redirection (EGR) system. Most engine functions, however, could impact the quality of your Ford's emissions. For this reason, an active check engine light will cause your Ford to fail a state inspection. Some codes, like the ones dealing with the powertrain control module itself, can be safely excluded from consideration.

    3

    Open your Ford's driver-side door. Set your clipboard and printouts in the navigator's seat. Glimpse under the driver's side dashboard and look for your Ford's data link connector. The DLC is your entrance into the Ford's diagnostic system. It will be located in different spots, depending on the model of Ford you are looking. Generally, the DLC outlet can be found somewhere between the left-side kick panel and the gas pedal on the right.

    4

    Connect your OBD-II scanner to your Ford's DLC outlet. Turn the scanner on.

    5

    Turn on the Ford's electrical system. Depending on the type and brand of device you own, you may need to get the Ford's engine running as well.

    6

    Key in a code retrieving command. How to exactly do this depends on the device you own. Defer to the directions in your scanner's handbook.

    7

    Read through the codes on your screen. Since you are trying to find a diagnosis for your Ford's emissions, ignore any code that's labelled as "Pending." Also, ignore any codes that do not begin with the letter "P."

    8

    Grab your clipboard off of the navigator's seat. Go through both the generic and Ford-specific OBD-II codes. Place checkmarks next to any fuel or exhaust related trouble codes. Once you are finished, you can either take your Ford and your list to a mechanic, or you can pursue the necessary repairs yourself.

How to Troubleshoot a Mustang Ignition Problem

How to Troubleshoot a Mustang Ignition Problem

A problem with the ignition system can result in an engine that will not start or an engine that starts but runs roughly. Troubleshooting the cause of an ignition problem requires an inspection of each of the system's main components, including the battery, the spark plugs and wires, and the distributor. Fortunately, because the ignition system's is fairly basic in design, the cause of most ignition problems can usually be located quickly.

Instructions

    1

    Check the condition of the battery with a voltmeter gauge. Place the black probe to the negative battery terminal, and then place the red probe to the positive terminal. The voltmeter should show between 12 and 14 volts. If it does not, have the battery and alternator inspected by a professional.

    2

    Examine the entire length of each spark plug wire for cracked or burnt insulation.

    3

    Examine the length of the spark plug wires for crossfire potential. Crossfire occurs when the current from one spark plug wire interferes with the current from another spark plug wire. Crossfire typically occurs when two spark plugs wires touch. To avoid this possibility, Ford installed spark plug wire separators, which are plastic brackets that hold the wires apart. The separators are located on top of the valve cover(s). If a wire has slipped out of its separator, press the wire into its groove within the separator.

    4

    Remove the spark plugs with a spark plug socket wrench and examine each plug's porcelain tip. If the deposits on the tip are anything but a light brown color, replace the plugs.

    5

    Examine the underside of the distributor cap for black or green-colored metal contacts, which could be preventing the spark from reaching the spark plugs.

    6

    Examine the metal tip of the distributor rotor for a burnt tip, which could be preventing the spark from reaching the distributor cap.

    7

    Check the distributor point gap with a blade-style feeler gauge. The points are the components at the base of the inside of the distributor, underneath the distributor cap, that look like tweezers. The distance between the two tips of the points is the gap. The gap must meet the engine's specifications. Consult the engine's specification's manual to determine the proper gap, as the gap varies depending on the year of the Mustang and the type of engine.

Sabtu, 26 Januari 2013

Problems With Noise in a 2005 Ford Mustang

Problems With Noise in a 2005 Ford Mustang

The 2005 Ford Mustang is a popular sports coupe, but owners of the vehicle have reported a variety of noise problems that occur during operation. These noise problems range from a creaking noise heard when turning the Mustang to squeaking and chirping noises coming from the car's tie-rod bushings and camshaft, respectively.

Camshaft Noise

    Owners have reported that the 2005 Ford Mustang's camshaft sometimes makes a chirping noise after the Mustang has been warmed up and running for a while. This noise is attributed to the car's synchronizer shaft and failure of a position sensor in the camshaft. The camshaft position sensor counts the revolutions of the camshaft to assist in the car's fuel efficiency. When the position sensor fails, the synchronizer shaft chirps because it is not being timed correctly by the computer.

Steering Noise

    A creaking noise can be heard while steering the 2005 Ford Mustang, according to some vehicle owners. The noise is attributed to steering rack bushings becoming damaged or prematurely worn. When the steering bushings become worn, the steering wheel has a lot of play and the creaking noise can be heard during this play.

Noise from Tie Rods

    Some Mustang owners have reported that the tie rod bushings located on the front of their vehicles have worn prematurely, causing the front of the Mustang to make a squeaking noise when in operation. The tie rod is the arm or rod which is attached to the knuckles on the wheels and the center link of the steering column. When the steering wheel inside the cab of the Mustang is turned, the tie rods turn the wheels in the desired direction. When the bushings become worn, the squeaking noise occurs.

What Are the Causes of Manual Transmission Vibration?

Although manual transmissions can last well over 100,000 miles, the clutch usually wears out sooner, according to AA1Car.com. Vibration, chatter, or jerking in the transmission typically affects the clutch. Causes typically involve misaligned, worn, or damaged parts.

Diagnosis Can Be Difficult

    Vibration in a manual transmission can originate from a number of different problems, so diagnosing the cause can prove difficult, according to Automotive Parts Network. Problems external to or in the transmission itself can cause the vibration.

Internal Problems

    Chattering, pulsing, or grabbing occurs when the clutch is engaged, according to Engine Mechanics. The problems could include a burned clutch lining, damaged flywheel, worn bearings or retainers, damaged clutch disc, or loose clutch cover.

External Problems

    Problems external to the transmission include chassis or drivetrain misalignment, loose or broken engine or transmission mounts, worn or damaged universal or CV joints affecting the drive shaft, according to Automotive Parts Network.

How to Tell If the Mass Air Flow Sensor Is Bad on a Ford 2005 F150?

How to Tell If the Mass Air Flow Sensor Is Bad on a Ford 2005 F150?

The 2005 Ford F-150 was available in 45 different trim packages, between the two-wheel drive and four-wheel drive models. A 4.2-liter V-6 engine was the base engine for the 2005 F-150. Optional engines for the 2005 F-150 were the 4.6-liter V-8 and the 5.4-liter V-8. The mass airflow sensor or MAF sensor, is responsible for sending a signal to the powertrain control module, as to the amount of air entering the engine through the air intake. A faulty MAF sensor can cause idling and overall engine running issues.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood on the F-150. Loosen the hose clamp from the air filter housing end of the MAF sensor, using a ratchet and socket. Disconnect the MAF from the filter housing. View the MAF sensor inside to make sure there are no obstructions. If any obstructions are in the MAF sensor or sensor screen, remove them. If not obstruction is found, inspect the entire air intake for any cracks or leaks in the system. Check the gasket between the MAF and the filter housing. Install the MAF sensor, and tighten the clamp snug with a ratchet and socket.

    2

    Go to the driver's side of the truck. Turn the key to the accessories position in the ignition, without starting the truck. Go back to the engine compartment. Disconnect the MAF electrical connector. Turn your multimeter to the volts setting. Measure the amount of volts between the positive "+" marked side of the wire harness, and the negative "-" battery terminal directly. The volt reading should be 10.50 volts or higher. If the voltage reading is less than 10.50, there is an electrical short or bad circuit between the MAF and the powertrain control module.

    3

    Remove the intake hose from the throttle body, using a ratchet and socket to loosen the clamp. If sludge or carbon is built up on the throttle body, perform the necessary upper air intake cleaning to remove the contamination. Install the air intake onto the throttle body and tighten the clamp snug. Remove the diagnostic codes for the MAF, and drive the car at least ten miles as you normally would. If the MAF codes P0101 or P0102 do not reappear, the sludge on the throttle body was the cause of the issue with your MAF sensor.

    4

    Clean the MAF sensor, using dielectric aerosol spray. If the symptoms or the trouble codes are not corrected by this procedure, replace the MAF sensor.

Jumat, 25 Januari 2013

Belt Noise in a Toyota Highlander

Belt Noise in a Toyota Highlander

Toyota recommends that Highlander owners change the timing belt at or around 90,000 miles. This can be a costly repair, but it is far less costly than repairing the damage that would happen to the engine if the timing belt broke. While some noise is normal from a timing belt, listening to your engine can help you avoid unnecessary damage.

Causes of Belt Noise

    Your Highlander's timing belt has tiny holes in it, just like the holes in the belt that you wear. Teeth enter the grooves and exit as the belt turns, and each time a tooth enters or exits the belt, the moving air pressure creates a noise.

    Over time, the noise that your Highlander's belt makes will likely change. As the belt ages, it will develop cracks because of the directional vibrations that go through it. The pulleys that turn the belt will also move due to engine vibrations. This will cause friction as the belt and the pulley come into closer contact than they had when the car was new.

Tension

    Over time, your Highlander's timing belt may lose its correct tension, which can lead to squealing noises. Have a mechanic check the belt's tension: If your belt is too loose, it will wear out sooner; if your belt is too tight, the components that it runs around will get more stress than they should, also leading to excess wear and tear.

Misalignment

    Improper alignment will usually result in a belt that squeals or chirps. Misalignment leads to additional friction between the belt and the pulleys, which will increase the wear that your belt experiences. A mechanic can align the drives for you and keep your belt from wearing out prematurely.

Breakage

    If your belt breaks, the engine will stop and will not start again. If your Highlander's pistons and valves do not have sufficient clearance, your engine's valves may suffer permanent damage.

Powerstroke 6.0 Head Gasket Symptoms

A head gasket is a metal seal surrounding each of an engine's cylinders. The Ford Powerstoke 6.0 engine has four valves per cylinder and eight total cylinders. When these components begin to fail, the symptoms can range widely from coolant leaks to problems with fuel combustion. Head gaskets require immediate attention to avoid more serious engine problems.

Leaking Compression and Coolant

    A head gasket leaking compression and coolant is on its way to failure. In a Powerstroke engine, this can result from overheating due to excessive towing or operational conditions that cause the engine to work outside of normal parameters. According to the automotive repair website AA1 Car, head gaskets can literally be crushed by heat expansion of the engine's cylinders, block and head. The expansion tears through the armor protecting the head gasket, which leads to degradation in the gasket itself and the symptoms of leakages, further overheating and eventual failure.

Engine Misfires

    A failing head gasket may cause the Powerstroke engine to misfire due to low compression within the engine's combustion chamber. An engine misfire is the explosion of fuel before it has an opportunity to reach the spark plugs. The explosion of fuel within the engine can be particularly harmful for pistons, which may contact other engine components and damage them. Engine misfires can also foul spark plugs and may lead to complete replacement of the engine.

No-Start Condition

    A blown head gasket may render the Powerstroke 6.0 engine unable to start. In this instance, the head gasket may have failed entirely, causing the failure of other engine components such as pistons, cylinders and head. This is a catastrophic engine failure, which may require the replacement of the entire engine depending on the extent of the damage. A vehicle that is experiencing a no-start condition where the head gasket is to blame will not respond to jump-starting.

Kamis, 24 Januari 2013

My Car Key Won't Turn

My Car Key Won't Turn

Most cars use a key to power and start the engine. A key that won't turn in the key cylinder can be extremely frustrating especially if you have appointments to make or you are stranded somewhere. A car must be in the park position in order to turn a key. A steering wheel may also lock disabling you from turning the key. Worn keys won't turn the ignition cylinder and must be replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Place the shift lever completely in park. The key will not turn in a car that is in between gears.

    2

    Turn the steering wheel from left to right. A steering wheel can lock up occasionally causing the key cylinder to lock and your key unable to turn.

    3

    Turn the key counterclockwise to the "Off" position and then clockwise to the desired position.

    4

    Have a new key made by the car dealer.

How to Troubleshoot an Edelbrock Marine Carb

Edelbrock produces two models of carburetors specifically designed for marine applications, the 600 cfm and the 700 cfm. Both models are part of Edelbrock's "Performer" series. These marine models are easily distinguished from their automotive counterparts by their bronze-colored finish rather than the automotive chrome finish. The marine designs also comply with U.S. Coast Guard standards, unlike the automotive models. Fortunately, the process of troubleshooting either marine carburetor is a fairly straightforward one and the same process applies to both models.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the air filter to expose the circular air horn gasket located on top of the carburetor. The air horn is the carburetor lid.

    2

    Inspect the air horn gasket for tears or breaks. A damaged gasket will cause an air leak, and must be replaced.

    3

    Start the engine and spray water a small quantity of water around the base of the carburetor and on each of the intake manifold's four sides with a spray bottle. If the engine's idle speed momentarily increases, either the gasket between the carburetor and the intake manifold, or one the intake manifold gaskets is damaged. The water temporarily seals the leak in the broken gasket and causes the engine speed to increase. When the water is sucked into the engine, the engine speed then lowers.

    4

    Adjust the fuel pressure if the boat is equipped with an aftermarket fuel pump. The carburetor is designed to work with no more than six psi at idle. Install a fuel regulator or replace the pump with an adjustable design if the current pump cannot be adjusted.

    5

    Unfasten the screws securing the air horn and remove it to access the two fuel floats attached to its underside.

    6

    Inspect the two fuel floats for cracks. If either is cracked, fuel will fill the float and cause too much fuel to enter the carburetor. Pay particular attention to the seam that runs along the length of each float. Contact Edelbrock or a parts dealer for a replacement float if necessary.

    7

    Invert the air horn and measure the distance between the top of each float and the underside of the air horn. This distance must be 7/16-inch. Insert a 7/16-inch drill bit between these two points. If needed, bend the metal tip attached to the air horn to adjust the distance.

Rabu, 23 Januari 2013

How to Check the Fuel Pressure in a 2006 Nissan Titan

In the 2004 model year, Nissan took the leap into the competitive, yet profitable full-size pickup market. Its entry was the 5.6-liter-powered Titan, and with a name like that, Nissan was certainly calling its shot. The 2006 Titan came equipped with the same 305-horsepower, 5.6-liter V-8 engine that its debut model had and this engine, just as all internal combustion engines, requires a specific amount of fuel pressure to operate correctly. Low fuel pressure can cause rough idle, misfiring, reduced power or may cause the vehicle not to run at all. Checking the fuel pressure requires a special gauge set and a fuel line disconnect tool that you might be able to rent from a nearby auto parts store.

Instructions

Testing the Fuel Pressure

    1

    Remove the two bolts on the front of the engine cover using a ratchet and socket, and lift the engine cover from the top of the engine. Place the cover in a safe location to prevent damage.

    2

    Find the intelligent power distribution module, which is the rectangular box located on the passengers side of the Titans firewall.

    3

    Open the IPDM and find the fuel pump fuse, which is the seventh fuse from the passengers side, in the top row of fuses. Pull this fuse with a slight wiggling motion to remove it. Set the fuse in a secure location for future re-installation.

    4

    Start the Titans engine and allow it to idle until the engine stalls. Crank the engine two additional times for five seconds each time to relieve any residual fuel pressure. Turn the ignition to the "Off" position.

    5

    Find where the fuel supply line connects to the Titans fuel rail inlet tube on the drivers side of the engine and locate the cylinder-shaped plastic cover. Pull the cover upward to expose the connection point between the supply line and the fuel rail.

    6

    Guide a 5/16-inch fuel line disconnect tool to the inlet on the fuel rail, with the cylinder end facing the union point between the supply line and fuel rail. Wrap the connection point between the hoses with a clean, lint-free shop cloth to catch any residual gasoline. Pull upward on the disconnect tool and hold this upward force while pulling the supply line upward to disconnect it from the fuel rail inlet. Leave the disconnect tool inside the end of the fuel supply hose.

    7

    Connect the quick disconnect adapter No. J-44321, which is a part of fuel pressure kit No. J-44321, to the fuel pressure gauge. Guide the adapter through the hole in the disconnect tool, then press the tool upward and hold it. Press the adapter into the fuel supply hose as far as it will go, then release the disconnect tool to lock it into place. Tug lightly on the adapter to check that there is a good connection.

    8

    Connect the rubber hose included with the pressure kit to the inlet on the fuel rail. Tighten the hose clamp with a flat-head screwdriver.

    9

    Reinstall the fuel pump fuse into the IPDM and turn the ignition to the Run position for 10 seconds, then turn the ignition off for two seconds. Turn the ignition to the Run position again and check for any leaks from the gauge.

    10

    Start the engine and allow it to idle for roughly 15 minutes, checking the connections for fuel leakage every three minutes. At idling speed, the correct fuel pressure remains steady at roughly 51 psi. If the pressure is drastically low more that 5 psi below the required pressure there is a problem in the fuel system, such as a failed fuel pump, congested fuel lines or clogged fuel filter.

Removing Pressure Gauge

    11

    Relieve the fuel pressure following steps 3 and 4 in Section 1.

    12

    Wrap the connection point between the adapter and the fuel supply hose with a clean, lint-free cloth to catch any residual gasoline. Release the quick-release adapter from the fuel supply hose using the disconnect tool. Loosen the hose clamp on the hose connected to the fuel rail using a flat-head screwdriver. Remove the fuel pressure gauge and the quick disconnect tool.

    13

    Clean the end of both fuel tubes, the one on the fuel rail and the fuel supply tube, with a clean, lint-free cloth.

    14

    Apply a thin coat of new engine oil to the tip of the fuel rail tube to avoid damaging the O-ring inside the fuel supply tube. Guide the fuel supply tube over the fuel rail tube. Press the fuel supply tube downward until you hear the connector click into place.

    15

    Check the connection by verifying that you cannot see the white line painted on the fuel rail inlet tube and that the second flange on the tube is directly under the connector there is no tube showing before the flange. Pull upward on the fuel supply tube with about 11 pounds of force to verify it made a good connection. If the fuel supply hose pops off, repeat the process from steps 3 through 5.

    16

    Reinstall the engine cover onto the top of the engine and tighten its retaining bolts to 49 inch-pounds, using an inch-pound torque wrench and socket.

    17

    Install the fuel pump fuse back into the IPDM and close the IPDM's lid. Turn the truck's ignition to the "Run" position for 10 seconds, then to the "Off" position for three seconds. Turn the ignition back to the "Run" position and check the connection point between the fuel rail inlet tube and the fuel supply hose for leaks.

How to Repair the Turn Signal & Flashing Hazard Switch on a 1995 Silverado Truck

The turn signal and hazard flasher switch on a 1995 Silverado truck gives you instant control of the turn signals and hazard flashers. The turn signal stalk juts from the side of the steering column and the hazard flasher button protrudes from the top. Both the stalk and switch are part of the turn signal switch assembly, often called a multifunction switch. If the switch malfunctions, you'll need to replace it immediately, as the switch is not serviceable. You can replace the turn signal and hazard flasher switch on your 1995 Silverado if you have basic auto-repair skills.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the upper steering column trim cover by prying it loose with the trim tool. Pull the cover off by hand, and set it aside.

    2

    Disconnect the Silverado's steering column harness from the turn signal and hazard flasher switch by hand.

    3

    Remove the turn signal and hazard flasher retaining screw with the Phillips screwdriver.

    4

    Remove and replace the Silverado's turn signal and hazard flasher by hand.

    5

    Thread the retaining screw into the Silverado's new turn signal and hazard flasher switch by hand. Tighten the screw with the Phillips screwdriver.

    6

    Plug the Silverado's steering column harness into the new turn signal and hazard flasher switch by hand. Reinstall the steering column trim cover by hand.

How to Troubleshoot a No Spark on an Electronic Distributor

How to Troubleshoot a No Spark on an Electronic Distributor

Electronic distributors replaced point distributors in automobiles throughout the 1970's. Since then there have been vast improvements, although distributors contain essentially the same components and operate on the same principles. Some newer vehicles have distributor-less ignition systems, relying entirely on sophisticated computer systems for timing and spark distribution. With a vehicle manual for specific specifications, and a few simple tools, diagnosing a no spark condition follows a few simple steps.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the distributor cap, and have an assistant crank the engine. Ensure that the distributor rotor is turning. If it is not, the distributor shaft is damaged or the timing belt or chain is broken. Remove the distributor and check the shaft first. Then check the other timing components.

    2

    Remove the electronic control module, and check it using the owners manual, or take it to a local auto parts store that offers free electrical component testing. If the control module tests bad, replace it.

    3

    Check the ignition coil. It is rare for the ignition coil to fail, so follow the test procedures in the manual carefully or have the component tested by a local auto parts stores. Testing coils is not always accurate as the primary tests are static, not dynamic. If there is any doubt, replace the coil.

    4

    Check the pick up coil. Many distributors use a magnetic pick up coil, and it will occasionally fail due to a broken connection or a jolt that causes the magnet to loose its magnetism. Follow the steps in your manual and check resistance on the pick up coil. If the resistance is outside of specifications, replace the pick up coil.

    5

    On older vehicles check the ballast resistor. If your ignition coil is the type that uses an external resistor, such as older dodge vehicles, check the voltage at the hot side of the coil. It should only be about 9 volts when the engine is turned over. If it is higher, the coil may not fire, and the extra voltage can cause the coil to fail. Replace both the resistor and the coil if the voltage reading is high.

How to Troubleshoot a Cavalier Fuel System

How to Troubleshoot a Cavalier Fuel System

If you have a full tank of gasoline and your Cavalier just stops running, you could have an issue with the fuel system. Most of the fuel system problems come from the fuel pump located in the gas tank of the Cavalier, but it can be a fuel filter as well. You can troubleshoot the fuel system on the Cavalier with a few tools right at home and save yourself the cost of taking it in to the auto shop.

Instructions

    1

    Pop up the hood on your Cavalier and set the parking brake. Locate the fuel line that enters the injector system. You will find the line on the top of the engine. You can follow the line back under the car and see it continues back to the fuel tank if you have trouble locating it.

    2

    Remove the fuel line from the injector unit with the pliers by squeezing the clamp and pulling the clamp back on the line. Have your small container there to catch any fuel.

    3

    Have your friend turn on the key and notice if fuel starts to flow. Have your friend turn off the key quickly. If you did not have fuel flow, then move on to the next step.

    4

    Place two wood blocks at the left rear tire. You will place one block in front, and one behind the tire. This will keep the car from rolling.

    5

    Jack up the passenger rear tire with the floor jack by positioning the jack under the frame and pumping. Once the passenger rear side of the car is high enough to slide under, place the jack stand under the frame to hold the car in position.

    6

    Slide under the car on the passenger rear and find the fuel filter. The fuel filter is located in the fuel line under the passenger side of the Cavalier. Remove the fuel filter connection on the front side of the filter by pulling back the clip on the line with your hand. The front side of the filter is the side closer to the engine.

    7

    Have your friend turn the key on and off again quickly. Notice if any fuel flows out the filter. If no fuel flows out, then you have an issue with the fuel pump or the fuel filter. Remove the other side of the filter clip and remove the filter completely. Have your friend turn the key on and off again. If fuel still does not flow, then you will need to replace the fuel pump unit in the fuel tank. If fuel flows through the line, then you need to replace the fuel filter.

My Sunroof Won't Work After the Battery is Disconnected

My Sunroof Won't Work After the Battery is Disconnected

Troubleshooting electrical issues with a car's sunroof can be difficult. The wire harnesses are tucked into the doors and the ceiling making them difficult to work on. Diagnosing the system should start with the most common or likely cause and progress to the least likely cause. Check the battery and fuse circuit; if both components are in good working order move on to the sunroof switch. Finally, verify that the motor is in good working order. Seek a qualified mechanic if you are not confident in making these repairs on your own.

Instructions

    1

    Reconnect the battery if it has been disconnected. Verify the battery terminals are clean and free from corrosion. Verify the cables are properly connected and on the correct terminals. Locate the ground connection on the chassis and verify it is clean and properly attached. Retest the sunroof circuit after the battery cables and connectors are clean and properly connected. The battery voltage should be greater than 12-volts.

    2

    Locate the fuse under the driver's side console; refer to your owner's manual for exact details. Check the fuse to see if it is blown by measuring the resistance through the fuse. A good fuse will display 0-ohms of resistance. A blown fuse with a resistance greater than 20,000 ohms, is an indication of excessive current in the circuit. Too much current can result from a short circuit in the wiring or an obstruction in the sunroof tracks. Verify the wiring is free from corrosion and abrasion. Verify the sunroof tracks are free from any debris. If needed, replace the fuse. Retest the sunroof.

    3

    Turn the key switch off. Locate the sunroof switch. Remove the switch. Cut a piece of wire one foot long and strip the insulation from the ends. The switch will have an open terminal, a close terminal and a common terminal. Connect the wire between the close terminal and the common terminal. The sunroof should begin to close. Connect the wire between the open terminal and the common terminal. The sunroof should begin to open. If the sunroof opens and closes with the jumper wire installed then there is a problem with the switch. Replace the switch.

    4

    Gently remove the headliner and overhead light. Locate the sunroof motor and disconnect the motor electrical connector. Remove the screws that secure the motor to the bracket. Remove the motor and place it on a test bench. Connect the positive terminal to plus battery and connect the negative terminal to minus battery. The motor should operate and spin freely. If the motor does not operate properly, repair or replace as required.

Selasa, 22 Januari 2013

How to Use an OBD II Scanner

How to Use an OBD II Scanner

An OBD-II scanner is the second version of the On-Board Diagnostics tool, which monitors engine functions. If a vehicle's engine experiences a malfunction, the "Check Engine" light comes on. An OBD-II scanner can access the resulting trouble codes within the vehicle's diagnostic computer, or power train control module. This computerized hand held device can only interact with vehicles manufactured in 1996 and later. Earlier vehicles use older diagnostic systems which vary depending on the vehicle manufacturer. Using an OBD-II scanner is relatively easy, and accessing trouble codes only takes a few minutes.

Instructions

    1

    Make sure the vehicle is turned off. Locate the Data Link Connector under the steering wheel. This is an outlet that allows access to the diagnostic computer, which in most vehicles is on the driver side.

    2

    Connect your OBD-II scanner to the Data Link Connector. The scanner cable has in a 16-pin plug that should naturally fit into the outlet.

    3

    Insert your vehicle's key into the ignition cylinder and switch to "On." Depending on the brand of OBD-II device, you may also need to turn the engine on and allow it to idle.

    4

    Turn the device on, if it did not auto-activate itself.

    5

    Key in a command to "read" or "scan" the diagnostic system. How to do this depends on the brand of OBD-II device you are using. Button layout differs from model to model, and some devices may use a menu system. Exact code retrieval instructions will be located in your device's handbook.

    6

    Read through the trouble codes on your device's read-out screen. Copy these codes down onto a sheet of paper. Some devices are USB equipped and can connect directly to a computer with a USB cable. If you have this type of OBD-II scanner, device-to-desktop connectivity will covered in your scanner's handbook.

    7

    Look up the trouble codes in your device's handbook. Typically, generic OBD-II codes are located in an appendix toward the back. These are the standardized generic codes good for all OBD-II compliant vehicles. Manufacturers also have a supplementary set. A vehicle's owner's manual will not have these codes. You will need to be look them up online or in a repair manual for your particular vehicle.

    8

    Turn the vehicle's electrical system off. If you had to start the engine, turn it off as well. Unplug the OBD-II scanner's diagnostic cord from the outlet and turn the device off.

Code 1443 on a 1996 Ford Escort

Your driving down the road and your check engine light comes on, you would think a problem with the engine would cause some kind of drivability problem, but in this case it doesnt. Trouble code P1443 will not exhibit any dysfunctional driving because it has to do with the evaporative emissions system. Likely to your surprise the code will not be found in a traditional code book, or your aftermarket repair manual. This is because code P1443 is specific to Ford and is used primarily to help Ford technicians diagnose problems with the EVAP system.

The Code

    You now know the specific system P1443 is related to, but according to manufacturer codes it means the PCM detected there was very little or no purge flow from the vapor canister. There are several cause for purge flow to blocked, but it will take in depth inspecting to find the root cause of the trouble code. Driving on this check engine light and trouble code, as long as its the only code, will not have any adverse effects on your engine. Even though it will not affect your engine, it will cause you to fail an emissions test, if your state happens to perform such testing.

What to Check First

    The first thing you should check are all the EVAP hoses from the gas tank, to the canister and purge valve and back to the intake manifold. You want to look for any cracked or kinked rubber hoses along with any disconnected hoses. The EVAP canister is located near the air filter box, which will need to be removed to inspect the canister. To remove the air filter box, remove the lid and filter and place them aside. Remove the bolts holding the filter housing to the vehicle and remove the housing to expose the vapor canister. Check the canister for any cracks at hose fittings and the around the casing. Replace any lines of the canister as necessary, and clear the trouble code.

The Purge Valve

    The purge valve is located in-line between the canister and the intake manifold. Remove the purge valve and inspect it. The purge valve may be mechanically stuck from some type of blockage. This would prevent pressure from flowing between the canister and the engine. It may also be stuck open preventing pressure from building up, causing a low flow of pressure when the PCM tries to purge the canister. If the purge valve is stuck open, or the diaphragm is seized, replace the purge valve and clear the trouble codes, you problem will likely be solved.

Other Concepts

    Rumor has it code P1443 can be set by a leaking or improperly tightened gas cap, but this is almost never the case. There could also be a fault in the circuit between the purge control valve and the PCM, preventing the valve from opening and setting trouble code P1443. To check the wiring visually trace it through the wire harness and back to the PCM. Speaking of the PCM, you should be aware that Ford issued a TSB on June 23, 1997 stating that the PCM may have improper calibration in relation to the EVAP system. The TSB number is 97-13-8 and relates directly to code P1443. Contact your local dealership with your vehicle identification number to see if you are eligible for a PCM reprogramming in light of this TSB.

Senin, 21 Januari 2013

2001 S-10 Blazer 4X4 Problems

2001 S-10 Blazer 4X4 Problems

There have been three recalls on the 2001 Chevrolet S-10 Blazer 4X4 SUV, two pertaining to the SUV's lighting system and one due to a faulty seat belt buckle base. In addition to these recalls, owners of the 2001 S-10 Blazer have reported premature failure of the vehicle's fuel pump.

Lighting Problems

    The 2001 S-10 Blazer 4X4 is part of the lighting recall which pertained to different problems that arose in more than 500,000 Chevrolet vehicles. A multifunction switch in the lighting system of these vehicles developed an open circuit which prevented stop lamps and hazard lamps from working. Another lighting problem arose because the side reflectors did not meet national standards. The switch carrier needs to be replaced by the dealership which takes care of the stop and hazard lamp problems. The side reflectors must be replaced by the dealership in order to meet the standards outlined under Federal Motor Vehicle Safety rules.

Faulty Buckle Base

    General Motors Corporation recalled more than 150,000 automobiles because of defective buckle bases of the seat belt. This recall included the 2001 S-10 Blazer 4X4. The defective buckle base installed does not bear enough load to prevent the buckle base from fracturing. This defect creates a safety hazard during an accident or when the brakes are slammed. The buckle base will be replaced with a new buckle base that meets the national standard.

Fuel Pump Failure

    In addition to the recalls, owners of the 2001 S-10 Blazer 4x4 have reported a problem with the SUV's fuel pump, according to Repairpal.com. Clogging in the vehicle's fuel filter requires the fuel pump to strain in order to pump gasoline through the fuel line and into the injectors, and fuel pumps in the S-10 Blazer have been failing due to this strain. To avoid this problem, technicians at Repairpal.com recommend that the fuel filter be changed every 30,000 miles.

Minggu, 20 Januari 2013

How to Diagnose Duramax Engines

How to Diagnose Duramax Engines

Duramax engines are usually found in large trucks like the 2001 Chevy and GMC models. These engines are basically V8 diesel engines built to carry heavy truck loads weighing more than 2,500 pounds. The engines are built with multi-layer steel head gaskets and aluminum heads. Because of the engine's design, the cylinder pressure is high, causing stress on the cylinder heads and head gaskets. This engine does not use pre-combustion chambers like older diesel engines did.

Instructions

    1

    Put the key into the truck's ignition and look for the check engine light. If there is a problem with the engine, the indicator light should be illuminated.

    2

    Open engine cover and remove the engine cover. Look at the steel head gasket to determine if the coating is scraped. If so, then replace the gasket.

    3

    Remove the fuel injectors and look to see if they are cracked. If they are cracked or damaged, replace them.

Sabtu, 19 Januari 2013

Why Does Running Out of Gas Make a Fuel Pump Go Bad?

Why Does Running Out of Gas Make a Fuel Pump Go Bad?

Running your car out of gas isn't just the embarrassing mishap that it used to be; it can end up costing you a pretty penny in repairs. Even running your car low on gas all the time can net similar results, which is one more reason to make sure you don't run out -- as if you needed one apart from the chiropractor bill.

The Problem

    Fuel isn't just your fuel pump's reason for being; it's also serves as a coolant to carry heat away from the pump motor and its associated bearings and vanes. Fuel entering through the pump pickup goes through the pump vanes. Those vanes are usually made of some sort of plastic and ride inside of a plastic case. As long as fuel flows through the pump, the vanes can't get any hotter than the fuel. Once that goes away, well, you can imagine what happens.

Electric vs. Mechanical Pumps

    While not particularly common today, engine-driven pumps were once the norm for most engines. An engine-driven or "mechanical" fuel pump uses a diaphragm actuated by a lever on the camshaft to suck fuel from the tank and push it to the carburetor. While they can be a bit difficult to prime after running out of gas, the pump diaphragm doesn't rely on cooling fuel flow the way an electric pump does. And even if it did, it's not going to do anything when the crankshaft isn't turning.

Leaving the Key On

    On most older cars, turning the ignition key to the on position would automatically engage the fuel pump and turn it on. Under normal conditions, leaving the key in the on position with the engine off would simply cause the fuel pump to recycle fuel through the system and stay as cool as it normally would. But this obviously isn't true if there's no fuel in the tank and you leave the key on. So the moral is: If you're out of gas, shut the car down ASAP and turn the ignition key to the "Off" position.

Self-Protection

    Many modern fuel pump controllers use a program that will automatically shut the fuel pump off if the line fails to pressurize. This is as much of a safety mechanism as anything else, since a pressure failure could just as easily indicate a severed fuel line as an empty gas tank. Less common are fuel pump timer systems, which will shut the pump off after a few seconds if you don't engage the starter.

Consistently Running Low on Gas

    Constantly running your car low on gas can damage the pump as surely as running it out of gas. There's a lot of junk floating around in your gas tank -- rust scale, dirt, metal particles, dead bugs, you name it. The fuel pump utilizes a "sock" pre-filter to catch this debris before it goes into the pump, but sock filters can eventually weaken and get cut by debris in the tank. When that happens, the debris goes into your pump, and you're into the local garage for $400. Keeping the tank at least a quarter full at all times will keep that debris dispersed in the fuel rather than allowing it to concentrate and collect around the filter.

How to Troubleshoot the Lock System on a 1998 Mercury Villager

Some Ford Mercury Villager minivans include a central lock system that also features a keyless entry. An anti-lockout safety feature is included, meaning the vehicle won't fully lock with the key in the ignition. The sliding door and lift gate are also included in the lock system. Problems with the lock system on the 1998 Villager can be related to the keyless entry system and various safety functions. These kinds of problems can be identified and corrected by following some troubleshooting steps.

Instructions

    1

    Replace the battery in the remote control device if the Villager's doors won't lock or unlock when you press the button. Open the battery cover and replace the battery. The coin-like battery's positive icon faces upwards.

    2

    Open the sliding rear door from the outside and examine the child-proof lock settings if the sliding door won't open from the inside. The childproof lock knob is on the door itself adjacent to the door lock. Push the knob to unlock the childproof function, then pull it to engage the childproof function.

    3

    Close the optional lift gate window if you can't make the lift gate unlock. The lift gate won't unlock while the window is open. You can lock the lift gate by pushing in the lock lever before you start to close the lift gate. You can also lock the lift gate by simply closing it, then turning the key clockwise. Just be aware that if you turn the key too far, the optional window will open and you'll have to start the whole process over again.

    4

    Remove the key from the ignition if the driver's side door won't lock. It's part of the anti-lockout system and is normal.

Kamis, 17 Januari 2013

How to Troubleshoot a Chevy ECM

How to Troubleshoot a Chevy ECM

Chevrolet vehicles manufactured before 1996 use an internal computer called an Electronic Control Module, and it oversees the automated engine diagnostic routines. A Chevrolet's ECM can sense problems as they present themselves, and it keeps an ongoing record. The ECM assigns each fault and malfunction a code, which corresponds with General Motors standardized descriptions. Some of these codes pertain to the ECM itself. If this module fails or works erratically, then the Chevrolet's whole diagnostic system becomes untrustworthy. Troubleshooting the module requires the same proceedure as pulling the vehicle's fault codes.

Instructions

    1

    Open your Chevrolet's driver's side door and find the Assembly Line Data Link. The ALDL, for all General Motors vehicles, will be found directly below the steering column, in the center of the dash's underside.

    2

    Run a length of jumper wire between the ALDL's "A" and "B" ports. These two slots are on the ALDL's top row, and all the way to the right, at the end. The "A" and "B" ports are also side by side.

    3

    Turn the Chevy's electrical system on, but leave the engine off. An active electrical system means the ECM will also be up and running.

    4

    Count the flash codes and record them onto a sheaf of looseleaf paper. The check engine light will flash the codes at you, in a series of long and short pulses of light. For example, General Motor's code 86 will appear as eight long flashes, followed six shorter flashes. There will be a dark, silent pause between coding sets.

    5

    Turn your Chevrolet's electrical system off and exit the car. You will need to research the flash codes your copied down. Your Chevrolet's owner's manual will not offer these codes. If you do not wish to spend a lot of money, you can find coding definitions online. However, if you want a source with a stronger sense of authority, you should obtain a Haynes or Chilton's manual for your Chevrolet's model and year. A repair handbook will also tell you, in detail, how to remedy problems with the ECM,

    6

    Consider taking the vehicle to the a General Motors approved mechanic. The ECM is a single a component, located behind the dash on the passenger's side. Repair options are limited. Besides investing the ECM's external wiring, you can either reprogram it or replace it. Replacement modules are not widely sold, so it would best to consult a professional opinion regarding your exact model and year.

Rabu, 16 Januari 2013

How to Troubleshoot a Banks Turbo

Gale Banks Engineering produces turbochargers and various turbocharger accessories for the aftermarket diesel turbo market. Installing Banks turbocharger upgrades on your diesel can substantially increase the engine's torque and horsepower output. However, upgrading the turbo system to run increased boost pressure numbers puts additional stress on the turbocharger, making turbo malfunctions more likely. Troubleshooting any problems with your Banks turbo will ensure the continued performance and reliability of your turbo diesel engine.

Instructions

    1

    Plug an ECU diagnostic reader into your vehicle's ECU access port, generally located in the driver's side footwell. This will easily troubleshoot any turbo malfunctions which trigger your vehicle's "Check Engine" light. The ECU diagnostic reader will give you a readout of all recorded error codes, as well as a description of the malfunction and the parts affected. If you don't have an ECU diagnostic reader, vehicle dealerships and car service centers generally offer free ECU diagnostic service.

    2

    Accelerate your turbo diesel engine to spool the turbocharger. Listen for any abnormal turbocharger noise, such as excessive turbo whine or grinding noises. Such noises often mean worn or failing turbocharger bearings or other internal turbocharger components. Other signs that the turbocharger's internal components are failing include turbocharger hesitation when accelerating, inconsistent turbo boost production, and in extreme cases, smoke leaking from the turbocharger unit. Have your malfunctioning turbocharger unit rebuilt or replaced immediately to ensure continued performance and reliability.

    3

    Use a Phillips-head screwdriver to loosen the hose clamp which secures the air intake to the turbocharger, mounted to the engine's exhaust manifold. Depending on vehicle make and model, it may be necessary to remove other engine components to access the intake hose clamp and turbocharger inlet, such as a plastic engine cover or exhaust manifold heat shield. Once you've accessed and loosened the air intake hose clamp, slide the intake hose off the turbocharger inlet, giving you access to the turbocharger compression wheel.

    4

    Inspect the turbocharger compression wheel visually for chips or dings, which can cause inconsistent boost production. Grip the compression wheel shaft and try to wiggle it back and forth. Turbochargers in perfect condition will allow no turbo shaft play. Any turbo shaft play can lead to more extensive turbocharger damage if not corrected, including complete turbocharger failure. If your Banks turbocharger allows any shaft play, have it rebuilt immediately to avoid a more costly repair or replacement.

How to Troubleshoot the Climate Control in an '01 Chrysler Town & Country

How to Troubleshoot the Climate Control in an '01 Chrysler Town & Country

Chrysler's 2001 Town & Country minivans are sold stock with a manual air conditioning and heating system that regulates temperature based on manual controls. Optional, fully automatic systems are also available and common, including an infrared three-zone automatic control as an option. The three-zone system maintains interior comfort levels for front and rear passengers. Problems with the climate control in a Town & Country can be related to sensors, air flow and distribution. Correct these issues by troubleshooting.

Instructions

    1

    Remove any items that might block the three sensors if the temperature isn't being maintained properly. There are three sensors in all, one in the rear control unit and two on the dash. The sensors monitor the surface temperature of the driver and occupants and adjust the climate control system appropriately. Remove handbags from the rear control and maps from the top of the dash.

    2

    Override the automatic system if it doesn't provide optimum climate control for your needs. You can set the left blower knob to any fixed speed by rotating the knob from low to high, for example. You can make manual adjustments to temperature too.

    3

    Use the correct zone setting for the conditions if the Town & Country's climate control isn't working properly. Use "Bi-Level" mode for cool air from the dash and warm air from the floor; "Mix" is good for snowy conditions because it send air to the windshield to keep it clear, and directs it at you; "Defrost" is good for quick demisting. Use "Recirculation" if the outside air is very humid, and you want to decrease humidity in the cabin.

Selasa, 15 Januari 2013

How to Troubleshoot the Service Engine Light for a 2007 Dodge RAM Truck

How to Troubleshoot the Service Engine Light for a 2007 Dodge RAM Truck

Your 2007 Dodge RAM truck has a problem. The diagnostic system has detected a malfunction, issued a trouble code and activated the "Service engine" light on your dashboard. You can either pop the hood and troubleshoot the problem by trial and error, or you can save a lot of time and have a scanner do it for you. Trucks manufactured after 1996 are required to use On-Board Diagnostic trouble codes, and an OBD-II scanner can access these codes. This sort of diagnostic tool is widely available, and it will save you money in mechanics' fees over the long term.

Instructions

    1

    Drive to an automotive parts store, or any discount superstore with a car department, and purchase an OBD-II scanner. The price tag might inspire sticker shock, but if you consider that many mechanics charge diagnostic fees, this piece of hardware can be deemed as an investment.

    2

    Turn off the engine once you arrive home. Leave the key in the ignition, however.

    3

    Exit your Dodge truck, but leave the door open.

    4

    Search beneath the steering wheel for a diagnostic port. It is black and it has 16 receptors for the scanner's 16-pronged plug.

    5

    Insert the scanner's plug into this diagnostic port.

    6

    Turn the scanner on.

    7

    Turn the Dodge's key so that the electrical system comes on. Wait a few seconds, and if the trouble code doesn't appear on the scanner, recheck that the plug is firmly in the port, and start the engine.

    8

    Write the trouble code onto a note pad, once it appears on the scanner. Then, shut the scanner and the Dodge down. Remove the key from the ignition and shut the truck's door.

    9

    Find the definition for the trouble codes you retrieved. Most scanners' users manuals have a listing of codes, but if you do not have the manual and need to search the Internet for a definition, you can find detailed listings at Obd-codes.com, Check-engine-light.com or Actron.com. Once you've looked up the code definition, you can decide for yourself whether to attempt a fix or consult a professional.

How to Diagnose a Bad Ignition Coil

How to Diagnose a Bad Ignition Coil

The ignition coil is the heart of the ignition system. The coil is made up of two sets of windings that work together to create the voltage necessary for spark plugs. The primary windings consist of up to 150 turns of heavy wire, and the secondary windings are made of up to 30,000 turns of fine wire. When a current flows through the coil and is then shut off, the magnetic field collapses and creates the voltage required for spark plugs. Diagnosing a suspected bad coil is easy and requires only a minimum of tools and experience.

Instructions

    1

    Disconnect the coil wire at the distributor cap. Insert an old spark plug into the coil wire and lay the spark plug on a metal engine component such as a valve cover. Crank the engine and observe the spark plug for operation. If you notice a hot blue spark, the ignition coil is working properly and requires no further testing. If you see no spark or a pale yellow spark, then continue the diagnosis.

    2

    Disconnect the negative battery cable with a socket and ratchet. Remove the wires at the ignition coil using a small combination wrench and note their positions. Inspect the coil for damage or oil leaks around the top. If any damage or leaks are found, replace the coil.

    3

    Connect the red ohmmeter lead to the positive (+) stud of the coil. Connect the black lead to the negative (-) stud of the coil. Turn the ohmmeter to the 0-2M ohm scale. The coil should read between .7 and 1.7 ohms across the terminals. Every coil will have a slightly different ohm reading, but if any coil shows zero or infinity as a reading, then the coil is bad and must be replaced.

    4

    Remove red meter lead from the primary stud and connect it to the center coil wire lead. Set the ohmmeter to the 2-20M ohm scale. The coil should read from 7,500 to 10,500 ohms. Every coil is slightly different, but if any coil reads zero or infinity on the ohmmeter, then the coil is bad and must be replaced.

    5

    Reconnect the high tension lead to the coil and distributor cap. Remove the old spark plug from the coil wire and reconnect the coil leads to the coil and distributor cap. Replace the coil wire leads in their original locations. Reconnect the negative battery terminal.

Senin, 14 Januari 2013

How to Locate the Number 3 Spark Plug on 2001 Jetta 1.8T

Engineered by VW's subsidiary Audi, the 20-valve 1.8T has changed the fortunes of more otherwise-boring compact cars than Chip Foose, Boyd Coddington and Xzbit combined. This is one of only a handful of four-cylinder engines in the world today capable of producing four-digit horsepower numbers, easily equal in popularity to Misubishi's 4G63. The 1.8T's self-diagnostic system is sophisticated enough to track down faults to a single cylinder; a handy little trick if you can find the cylinders in the first place.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the plastic engine cover. You'll find that it's secured to the motor with four 1/4-turn screws; one each at the front corners, one at the left-rear corner and a fourth just to the top right of the VW logo on the cover. Lift the cover free to expose the coil packs on the cylinder head.

    2

    Remove the 10 mm nut securing the plastic, L-shaped box to the top of the cylinder head and lay the box to one side. You'll find this box just over the last cylinder on the right. Remove the three Allen-head bolts that secure the last metal bracket on the cylinder head, located under the box you just removed and above the ignition coil.

    3

    Locate cylinder No. 3. The "front" of the engine is the side with the belts; cylinder No. 1 is the front-most cylinder (the one closest to the belts), and cylinders No. 2, No. 3 and No. 4 extend back from there. Disconnect the wiring harness to the coil over cylinder No. 3.

    4

    Slide the tip of a large, flat-bladed screwdriver under the head of cylinder No. 3's coil pack and rest the screwdriver shaft on the protruding ridge atop the valve cover. Now, push down on the screwdriver handle and use the driver as a lever to gently push the coil up and off the spark plug. It should release with an audible pop.

    5

    Pull the coil out of the head and look down into the hole it just vacated. You'll see the top of the No. 3 spark plug at the bottom of the plug well.

How to Disable a 2000 Beetle Alarm

The Volkswagen Beetle, known as the VW bug, has created newer models that have been redesigned to be more fuel efficient and safer. Newer safety features include the air bag and the car alarm. The new alarm system is vital to preventing car theft. It is recommended you keep your car alarm enabled; however, you may come across issues with the alarm. Many users have discovered the alarm will go off when unlocking their own door, preventing them from starting the car. If you come across this issue you may want to disable your VW Beetle alarm. There are a few ways to turn off and disable your alarm system. Turning off the alarm system in a 2000 VW Beetle requires little knowledge and may be completed by almost any driver.

Instructions

    1

    Unlock the driver's side car door. Leave the door open while unlocking and opening car trunk. Go back in your car and start your vehicle while the trunk and driver's side car door are open. This will temporarily turn off your alarm and allow you to start your car. However, this will not permanently fix the car alarm issue.

    2

    Disconnect wires from your car battery to also temporarily disable your car alarm. Remove the wire connected to main power to disarm your alarm permanently. You must locate all wires connected to the battery and disconnect them to disable alarm. If you are unfamiliar with the wires in your car see a local car shop to purchase the VW Beetle's wiring chart. It is recommended you take your vehicle and have them remove the correct wires for you. Complete reversing of wires until they all have been safely disconnected.

    3

    Disconnect or cut the wire used for your horn or siren. This will permanently disable your horn. Driving without a horn may be dangerous. It is recommended you disable your alarm using the previous steps. Determine the wire labeled as your "horn siren". Remove the wire to completely disable your horn. Note, you may be able to reconnect your horn wire, however, it is not guaranteed the horn will continue to work.

My Acura 3.2 TL Won't Start

Your Acura is essential for getting around town, so if the car won't start, you could be dead in the water. You don't have to be an Acura mechanic to get your car running again. There are several issues that you can check out to get your car started. The battery is the most common issue that cars have when it comes to starting. A low or dead battery can impede the starting ability. However, the fuel level, alternator and starter could also be the problem.

Instructions

    1

    Turn the ignition to start the car. If you hear a clicking noise, get the alternator or starter checked by a certified mechanic.

    2

    Check the fuel levels in the car if the electricity will turn on. Add gas to the car if needed and then try to restart the car.

    3

    Open the hood and check the battery terminals for any corrosion. Corrosion on the battery can be cleaned with a wire brush and a can of soda. Scrub the corrosion off and then reattach the terminals to the battery. Try to start the car.

    4

    Jump the car with jumper wires and a friend's car. Leave the car running for around five minutes and then turn the car off.

    5

    Restart the car. If the car does not restart, change the battery.

Minggu, 13 Januari 2013

How to Access the Error Codes for a Ford Ranger

Ford Rangers produced since 1996 have the standardized OBD-II on-board diagnostic system that monitors engine performance. Issues that arise with different aspects of the engine, such as oxygen sensors or timing sensors, are stored in the OBD system. The best way to pull the information off the computer is to use a scan tool available at any auto-parts store.

Instructions

    1

    Check the vacuum hoses connecting to the air cleaner. You should have no loose or disconnected hoses. The air filter must be in place during testing.

    2

    Start the vehicle and allow it to run for 15 minutes or until it reaches operating temperature.

    3

    Connect the STAR tool or equivalent to the self-test connectors located beneath the dash or along the power cables coming off the positive terminal of the battery.

    4

    Turn the ignition switch to "ON" but do not start the vehicle. The Key On Engine Off codes (KOEO) will display on the readout of the device.

    5

    Start the vehicle, and rev the engine to 2,000 to 3,000 rpm until the engine code or a service code is displayed. Let the engine idle during the testing process. Record any codes that are displayed. This is the Key On Engine Running (KOER) test.

    6

    Consult the dealer or a vehicle manual for a definition of the error codes. The manual for the tester will contain a list of the majority of the codes.

Sabtu, 12 Januari 2013

How to Test the Alternator on a Vehicle

How to Test the Alternator on a Vehicle

If your automobile's engine seems to be losing power or your interior lights are dim or your windshield wipers work only intermittently, you might have a faulty alternator. The alternator powers your vehicle's battery with electricity and keeps all the extra electrical components running, such as headlights, air conditioning, windshield wipers and the radio. If the battery light on your car's dashboard illuminates and stays lit, it means the battery is not being charged. But before you replace your battery, do a simple test to see if your alternator is functioning at full capacity.

Instructions

    1

    Borrow a voltmeter or purchase one from an auto parts store to test your alternator's electrical output. Voltmeters are relatively cheap to buy and are available in digital and analog versions.

    2

    Start your automobile. If your battery is dead from power drain, use a battery booster or jumper cables to jump start your car. Even if the alternator is failing, your vehicle will start and run for a short period of time.

    3

    Connect the voltmeter probes to the battery posts. Attach the red probe from the voltmeter to the positive (red) post on the car battery and the black probe from the voltmeter to the negative (black) post on the battery. Set the voltmeter to the direct current (DC) scale.

    4

    Run the engine at a fast idle, for example, around 2500 rpm. Turn off all electricity draining accessories, such as headlights, windshield wipers, radio, rear defoggers and air conditioning.

    5

    Check the battery voltage on the voltmeter, looking for a reading between 13.6 and 14.3 volts. Your alternator must generate a higher voltage than your car battery's rated voltage -- usually 12 volts -- to sufficiently supply the battery and all the extra electrical components. A reading lower than 12 volts points to an undercharging alternator, while a reading over 15 suggests your alternator is overcharging, indicated by, for example, a seeping battery or both headlights failing at the same time.

    6

    Turn on and operate at full speed all car accessories that draw electricity, such as headlights, windshield wipers, radio, rear defoggers and air conditioning. Maintain the engine speed at a fast idle for a couple of minutes and verify that the voltmeter reading remains around 14 volts. If the reading is lower than 13 volts, the alternator is likely not working at full capacity.

    7

    Race the vehicle's engine and listen for a squealing noise, which could indicate that the drive belt on the alternator is faulty. The drive belt rotates the alternator, converting the mechanical power from the engine to electrical power to charge the battery and other electrical components. If the belt is worn (appears shiny), cracked or loose, this can cause the alternator to undercharge.