Jumat, 31 Mei 2013

Troubleshooting 2004 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Brake Lights

Troubleshooting 2004 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Brake Lights

There are three main components of the brake lights on a 2004 Chevrolet Silverado 1500: the connections, the bulb and the fuse. These are also the source of most common problems with the brake lights, and thankfully, they all have simple solutions. Troubleshooting the brake lights on your 2004 Silverado is a simple process that requires only a few tools and takes no more than 10 minutes. Because the brake lights are important for your safety as well as others on the road, they should be fixed as soon as possible.

Instructions

    1

    Park the Silverado and turn off the engine. Open the tail gate.

    2

    Remove the two rear assembly screws near the tail gate latch. Pull out the lamp assembly. Make sure all three wires are securely connected and that all three bulbs are plugged in correctly. If the brake lights are still malfunctioning, the bulb may need to be replaced.

    3

    Disconnect the wiring harness from the topmost bulb which is the brake light. Press the release tab and rotate the socket counterclockwise to remove it from the assembly. Pull the old bulb out of the socket and place a new bulb into the socket. Wipe the new bulb down with a clean cloth before installing it. Replace the socket into the assembly and rotate it clockwise to lock it into place. Reinstall the rear lamp assembly and the two rear assembly screws. Close the tail gate. If the brake lights are still not working, there may be an issue with the fuse.

    4

    Open the hood of the Silverado. Use a wrench to disconnect the negative terminal of the battery then disconnect the positive terminal.

    5

    Lift the cover of the under-hood fuse block on the driver's side of the vehicle. Locate the fuse labeled "STOP LP." This is the stop lamp fuse. If the metal rod inside is broken, the fuse has blown out and should be replaced with a fuse of equal amperage. Hold the fuse between your thumb and index finger and pull it out. Place the new fuse into the fuse block. Replace the cover back onto the under-hood fuse block and close the hood.

Chevrolet Colorado Engine Problems

Chevrolet Colorado Engine Problems

The Chevrolet Colorado is a mid-sized pickup truck first released in 2004. The Chevy Colorado features numerous engine options that range in size from 2.8-liters to 5.3-liters. Engine problems are common with specific models and may occur if Chevrolet suggested maintenance isn't followed.

2004-05 Engine Misfire

    According to Consumer Guide Automotive, the 2004 and 2005 Chevy Colorado are known to misfire. An illuminated check-engine light will accompany the misfiring engine. The misfiring is caused by compromised exhaust valve springs. Replacing the exhaust valve springs will fix the problem.

2004-06 Fuel Gauge Issue

    The 2004, 2005 and 2006 Colorado fuel gauge sensor and indicator are known to misread fuel levels. If the engine does not turn on and the fuel gauge reads full, the tank may actually be empty of gas. Models known for this problem include all California models and those with a 4-cylinder or 5-cylinder engine.

Suggested Maintenance

    The 2009 Chevrolet Colorado owner manual suggests an exhaust system inspection every 25,000 miles. After reaching 100,000 miles, spark plug replacement is suggested. Inspection of the engine accessory drive belt is suggested at 150,000 miles.

Kamis, 30 Mei 2013

Dodge Caravan Heater Troubleshooting

Dodge Caravan Heater Troubleshooting

We sometimes take it for granted that the heater in our Dodge Caravan will operate when we turn it on, but there are few things worse on an icy morning than finding out that no air or only cold air is coming out of the vents. Some easy troubleshooting steps can have your heater working effectively again.

No Air From the Vents

    Check the fuses if your heater is not working properly.
    Check the fuses if your heater is not working properly.

    If you turn the heater on, but there is no air coming out of the vents and the blower is silent, you may have a blown fuse. Check the fuses in the Totally Integrated Power Module on the engine compartment near the battery. Replace the 10-amp red fuse to see if that solves the problem.

Pinched Heater Hoses

    Check under your hood and examine your heater hoses. They run from the engine cooling system to the heater core. If they are pinched, you will not get heat. Try to remove the crimp in the hose; if this doesn't work, replace them.

Check the Coolant Level

    The heating system will only work if the radiator in your Caravan has enough coolant. If the level of coolant is low, the heater hoses may store pockets of air that will block block the delivery of warm air. Start the engine, and when it has heated up to normal temperature, turn it off and touch the heater hoses. If they are not hot to the touch, check the coolant level and add more, if necessary.

How to Troubleshoot a 1993 Dodge Dakota With a Brake Pedal That Goes to Floor

How to Troubleshoot a 1993 Dodge Dakota With a Brake Pedal That Goes to Floor

Chrysler Corporation introduced the Dodge Dakota in 1987. The 1993 Dodge Dakota base model had two-wheel drive and a five-speed manual transmission, with 2.5-liter, in-line four-cylinder engine. An optional 3.9-liter V-6, or 5.2-liter V-8 were available in the upgraded trim packages. The basic brake system on the 1993 Dakota consisted of front ventilated disc brakes and rear drum brakes. The brake pedal going to the floor of the truck when stopping is almost always an indicator that there is a leak and air is entering the system.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood of the Dakota. Inspect the brake fluid reservoir level. The brake fluid should be at the "Full" mark if your brake lines are functioning well, and your brake parts are not too far worn. If the brake fluid is low or the reservoir is empty, fill the reservoir completely with brake fluid, then put the cap back on the reservoir.

    2

    Raise the front of the Dakota with a jack. Place jack stands just inside the lower control arms, beneath each frame rail. Lower the truck onto the jack stands. Place wheel chocks behind both rear wheels of the truck.

    3

    Lay beneath the front bumper of the Dakota. Ask your assistant to gently sit in the cab of the truck. Ask him to depress the brake pedal gently. Inspect the bottom of the truck for a brake fluid puddle buildup, while simultaneously listening for a light hissing noise from any of the front brake lines.

    4

    Move yourself below the transmission, and check the metering valve, just below the driver's seat on the frame of the truck. Have your assistant depress the brake again. If you locate a leak from the brake lines or a brake-line fitting, you will need to replace the brake line. Always bleed the entire brake system after replacing any brake lines. If you still have not found a leak in the front brake system, proceed to Step 5.

    5

    Ask your assistant to step out of the truck. Raise the truck off of the jack stands. Lower the truck to the ground. Move your wheel chocks in front of the front wheels of the truck. Raise the rear of the truck, and place jack stand at either end of the axle housing. Lower the truck onto the jack stands. Recheck the brake fluid reservoir, and fill it as needed.

    6

    Ask your assistant to sit back inside the truck. Lay beneath the rear bumper of the truck. Inspect the rear tires on the inboard side, and the rear brake backing plates, for wetness. Ask your assistant to gently push the brake pedal to the floor. Inspect for possible brake fluid leaks by looking for excess moisture beneath the truck. Pay close attention to the back of the brake backing plates, as well as the "T" shaped proportioning valve mounted to the rear axle housing.

    7

    Lower the truck to the ground if you do not find a visible brake line leak anywhere on the truck. If your pedal is going to the floor, and you are not losing brake fluid, you will need to replace the brake master cylinder or the brake vacuum booster.

Selasa, 28 Mei 2013

How to Diagnose a Bad Wheel Hub Bearing Assembly on a Silverado

How to Diagnose a Bad Wheel Hub Bearing Assembly on a Silverado

Chevrolet Silverado full-size trucks use a hub and wheel bearing that is a single, sealed unit. The wheel speed sensor for the anti-lock braking system also works with the hub wheel bearing as well. The wheel hub bearing assembly attaches the wheel to the steering knuckle and the suspension and steering components of the truck. The hub connects to a splined axle shaft that provides power in four-wheel drive trucks and is freewheeling in two-wheel drive trucks. Wheel bearings on the Silverado are permanently lubricated from the factory and are non-repairable.

Instructions

    1

    Evaluate the vehicle symptoms carefully. If you are diagnosing the vehicle for someone else, ask as many questions as possible about the problem with the vehicle. Ask if the driver is feeling any vibration while driving down the road, or hearing any noises. Take note if the ABS malfunction indicator light is on. If you are diagnosing your own vehicle, write all of the symptoms down to help you clarify exactly what the problem could be.

    2

    Drive the vehicle on a short test drive and listen for any noises to verify the symptoms. Wheel bearing noise will usually start at relatively slow speeds and increase in intensity as the vehicle speed increases. The noise may change when you lightly apply the brakes, or perform light side-to-side steering maneuvers if a hub wheel bearing is to blame.

    3

    Lift the vehicle in the air with a floor jack or vehicle lift. Spin the front wheels by hand and listen for a noise from either or both sides. If you hear an abnormal noise, the bearing has failed and needs to be replaced. Confirm the noise by running the truck on the lift and listening with a mechanic's stethoscope, if necessary. Place the probe for the stethoscope close to the hub, in an area that is not spinning with the wheel. You should hear the noise clearly when you are listening close to the hub, and the noise will fade as you move the probe further away.

    4

    Mount a dial indicator so that the measuring surface contacts the vertical surface of the wheel at about the top of the upper wheel stud. Zero the meter's gauge by rotating the face so that the needle is at 0.000 inches. Grasp the top and bottom of the wheel and attempt to move it in and out. Be certain that any movement is in the hub and not the steering knuckle. Take note of the dial indicator measurements. If the wheel moves more than 0.005 inches, the bearing has failed and must be replaced.

How to Troubleshoot a Gearbox

How to Troubleshoot a Gearbox

The purpose of a gearbox is to transfer power from the vehicle's engine to one or more driving axles. The gearbox has more than one gear that switches from one to another at various speeds. It can be operated either manually or automatically. At some point, small problems may start to occur in the gearbox. Some of these problems can be resolved with a few simple troubleshooting steps without a technician's intervention.

Instructions

    1

    Determine if the gear case gets extremely hot. If this happens, it may be due to insufficient or too much oil. You will need to adjust the oil to the correct level. Other reasons may include oil contamination, improperly mounted bearings or a misaligned shaft.

    2

    Listen for any unusual noises coming from the gearbox. If there are noises, open the hood of your car and check for any loose bolts and tighten them. Foreign particles mixed in the oil can also cause excessive noise. You will need to flush the oil out and replace it with new oil.

    3

    Replace damaged or worn bearings if you feel any vibration while driving. Check for loose mounting bolts and tighten them. Vibration may also be caused by misaligned wheels so have a wheel alignment performed.

    4

    Inspect under your car for oil leaks. If there are leaks, replace any worn oil seals. Look for loose mounting bolts and tighten them. The gear case may also need to be replaced.

The Results of a Broken Radiator

Radiators are simple components that do a simple job in a complicated way. And considering how important they are, it seems a bit paradoxical that radiators are also so fragile by nature. A radiator can fail in any number of ways, and none of them are particularly good for your cooling system.

Leaks

    If you haven't seen a radiator leak, you haven't owned a car long enough. The cooling tubes in your radiator connect to the thin fins with hundreds of tiny solders and welds. When those junctures break, pressure in the cooling system causes water to spray out of the hole. Worse, even a hole at the very top of your radiator can completely empty your cooling system once heat in the block turns the water into steam. Once you run out of coolant, it's only a matter of time before combustion chamber temperatures heat-soak the block and fry everything.

Bent Fins

    Bent radiator fins used to be quite common, but they aren't as common as they used to be. One reason is that almost every new car has an air conditioner, and the AC condenser ahead of the radiator protects the front. The other reason is that most now car use electric cooling fans, which aren't as prone to damaging the radiator as mechanical ones. But still, the condenser fins can bend, and that's just as bad. Bent fins reduce airflow and effectively eliminate the cooling capability for that portion of the radiator; get enough of them, and the radiator no longer cools your engine and things go boom.

Clogging

    Radiator clogs can happen for a number of reasons. The first has to do with mineral buildup in the system as a result of dissolved calcium and lime in the water. But you never have to worry about that, because you always use factory-specified pure and deionized water in your radiator, right? Rust scale in the radiator is another insidious source of clogging, generally the result of either not using antifreeze or not replacing it regularly enough. When these agent get into the small tubes in your radiator, they'll block them off and force the remaining junk through the rest of your tubes. The resulting cascade effect of failure is a recipe for engine meltdown.

Consequences

    Most cooling systems will only hold about 15 pounds of pressure before they vent; a little basic math tells us that's a 250 degree boiling point. If fluid stops circulating in a particular area and that area hits more than 250 degrees, the water in that area will boil off and away from the hot surface. So, you wind up with an exponential overheating that quickly vaporizes the water, spikes pressure in the cooling system and blows your coolant out. Considering the fact that the gases in your combustion chamber can reach over 2,000 degrees -- well above the melting point of aluminum -- allowing that heat to soak directly into the block is begging for massive failure.

Senin, 27 Mei 2013

How to Reset the Cummins ABS in a Dodge

The anti-lock brake system, or ABS, in a Cummins Diesel Dodge pickup is an important safety feature. The ABS prevents the wheels from locking up during inclement weather and sudden stops. The ABS computer controls the entire system and monitors it for any problems. When the ABS computer detects a problem with the ABS, it stores a trouble code in its memory and turns on the ABS light on the dashboard. Clearing the code from the computer's memory resets the ABS and turns off the dashboard light.

Instructions

    1

    Park the vehicle on a flat surface and turn off the engine. Turn the ignition switch back to the "ON" position so the dashboard has power, but don't start the engine.

    2

    Plug an automotive scan tool's data connector into the vehicle's diagnostic data port. This port is normally located underneath the dashboard, above the pedal area.

    3

    Depress the power button on the scan tool and allow it to boot up. Choose the "ABS" option from the main menu. Select "Clear all current and stored codes." Wait while the scan tool clears the codes from the ABS computer.

    4

    Disconnect the scan tool and start the engine. Verify that the ABS dashboard light is not illuminated. The ABS system is now reset.

How to Check If a Car's Fuel Pump Is Working

How to Check If a Car's Fuel Pump Is Working

Without the fuel pump, there would be no gas delivery to the engine for combustion. Fuel pumps, whether mounted externally on the engine or inside the gas tank, perform the same function of sending enough fuel at just the right pressure to the carburetor, or fuel injection rail. Too much or too little pressure can cause problems, including fuel starvation or flooding, which causes rough idle, mid-range stumble or a no-start condition. Because the engine depends on combustion, spark and fuel, diagnosing the fuel pump has a few of its own procedures and system checks.

Instructions

    1

    Refer to your owner's repair manual to determine what kind of fuel delivery system you have in your vehicle. Some fuel pumps will be eternally mounted mechanical components, while other fuel pumps use electronic signals from the vehicle computer and mount inside the gas tank. Check your gas tank level to be certain a low-fuel or no-fuel condition does not exist. There should be no external leaks from the gas tank line to the fuel intake system.

    2

    Place the vehicle in park or neutral with the emergency brake set. Let the engine idle. Raise the hood. Remove the air cleaner lid by unscrewing the wing nut if your vehicle has the older carburetor design. Look down the throat of the carburetor while you manually open the throttle linkage, using a fast flicking motion. The sudden opening of the throttle will produce a stream of gas that spurts into the carburetor throat. Evidence of a strong gas stream indicates good fuel delivery. If the engine cuts out, or the stream looks weak, the problem will be with insufficient fuel delivery from the pump.

    3

    Remove the air cleaner lid or disconnect the cold air intake hose at the throttle body to diagnose a no-start condition. Hold a spray can of starting fluid over the intake passage and have an assistant turn the key to the "Start" position. Spray the starting fluid into the intake while the engine turns over. If the engine starts or attempts to fire, it will mean the fuel pump has malfunctioned.

    4

    Refer to your owner's repair manual for the location of the fuel pump relay for a no-start condition. It should be located in the main fuse-block panel in the engine compartment or at the left side of the steering wheel under a plastic kick panel. The relay looks like a small black box and will have multiple connectors on it. Swap it with another similar relay in the fuse block and check for engine start. If the engine starts, replace the fuel pump relay.

    5

    Lift the vehicle up with a floor jack and place two jacks stands under the frame near the rear wheels. For this no-start condition, you will check the electric fuel pump inside the gas tank for operation. Don an automotive stethoscope and slide under the gas tank. Place the probe of the stethoscope near the top of the gas tank and have your assistant turn the key to the "On" position. If you do not hear a hum or buzz through the stethoscope, it indicates negative fuel pump operation.

    6

    Connect a fuel pressure gauge that has a "T" fitting to the fuel intake line just ahead of the fuel injection rail, or at the carburetor intake line, if so equipped. Disconnect the line clamp with either a slot screwdriver or the correct size end wrench. Refer to your owner's repair manual for the correct pressure reading for "residual fuel pressure" in pounds per square inch. The key should be in the "Off" position. If you read below specifications for residual fuel pressure or no pressure at all, the problem will lie with the fuel pump, a clogged fuel line or an impacted fuel filter.

    7

    Hook up the fuel pressure gauge as you would for the fuel pressure residual test. If the engine idles, even roughly, note the pressure reading on the gauge. The PSI reading should not fall below the manufacturer's specifications for your make and model vehicle. If it shows a low reading, the problem can be attributed to the fuel pump, a clogged line or a clogged fuel filter.

How Do I Troubleshoot Poor Gas Mileage on a 2005 Ford Escape?

How Do I Troubleshoot Poor Gas Mileage on a 2005 Ford Escape?

Sport utility vehicles are generally not well known for achieving great gas mileage. The Ford Escape, however, does not fit the mold of a typical SUV. Rather, the Escape has a smaller body and more efficient engine to maximize its miles per gallon. The 2005 version of the Escape is no different. Whether your '05 Escape is equipped with a 4-cylinder or 6-cylinder engine, it should be managing beyond 20 mpg on the highway. If you've noticed your Escape is losing fuel efficiency, there are several things you can do to troubleshoot the problem.

Instructions

    1

    Check the spark plugs in your Escape and replace them if necessary. Spark plugs are essential to proper combustion within the engine. If the combustion process is not working correctly, gas mileage will be reduced. If the plugs are old, coated in carbon or you can't recall the last time they were replaced, then it's time to have new spark plugs installed.

    2

    Check the Escape's oxygen sensors to ensure they are working correctly. Have your mechanic check the sensors if necessary. Oxygen sensors help provide the correct air-to-fuel ratio. If the oxygen sensors are malfunctioning, the ratio will be thrown off and your SUV's fuel efficiency will be reduced.

    3

    Check the Escape's air filter. Again, for proper combustion to take place, your Escape needs to have plenty of clean air. A clogged or dirty filter inhibits the amount of available, clean air.

    4

    Inspect the Escape's fuel injectors. Locating, testing and repairing fuel injectors involves a high level of mechanical aptitude and time. If you lack the know-how, take your Escape to a qualified mechanic. If the injectors are clogged or leaking, your Escape's gas mileage will suffer.

    5

    Check the Escape's engine oil and change it approximately every 3,000 to 5,000 miles. To achieve greater gas mileage, the engine must run as smoothly as possible. Good, clean oil is necessary for this to happen. Consider using a quality synthetic oil or oil specifically designed to reduce friction and optimize your gas mileage.

    6

    Check the tires on your Ford Escape. If the air pressure is low, the SUV's gas mileage will be reduced. Look in your owner's manual or on the sidewall of the tires themselves for the appropriate air pressure and then inflate the tires as needed.

    7

    Reduce the weight in your Ford Escape. If you're carrying unnecessary cargo or if you've added aftermarket accessories, the extra weight will decrease your fuel mileage.

    8

    Examine your driving habits. Avoid driving your Ford Escape at high speeds, as this will reduce gas mileage. Also avoid sudden, rapid acceleration and braking, as this too will reduce gas mileage.

Why Does My Car Run Better With the PCV Valve Unplugged?

Why Does My Car Run Better With the PCV Valve Unplugged?

The PCV valve is the key component in the positive crankcase ventilation system. A defective PCV valve can cause a number of problems for an automobile engine. Though you can remedy these problems by unplugging the valve, your better option will involve replacing it.

Defective Valve Effects

    A defective PCV valve will fail to vent exhaust gases in the engine. These gases will build up pressure inside the engine, causing oil leaks and other problems. A PCV valve that fails to work properly will restrict the amount of air entering the engine, causing idle problems and reducing fuel efficiency.

Unplugged Valve

    If a car runs better with the PCV valve unplugged, the valve is likely not working properly and requires replacement. The unplugged valve allows the exhaust gases to vent through the valve opening, which reduces pressure in the engine from the exhaust gases.

Reasons to Replace

    Unplugging the PCV valve can expose the engine to moisture and potentially harmful debris. The unplugged PCV valve allows exhaust gases to escape the engine, increasing vehicle emissions as well as restricting air flow to the engine and in turn causing a reduction in engine performance and an increase in fuel consumption.

Minggu, 26 Mei 2013

Causes of a Knocking Noise in a Chevy Blazer 2001

The Chevrolet Blazer is a mid-sized two-door SUV that was manufactured from 1990 to 2005. Engine knocking is the result of an improper air and fuel mixture, which causes an uncontrolled combustion. The uncontrolled combustion causes a shock wave that sounds like knocking.

Overheating

    If the engine of your Chevrolet Blazer overheats, the air and fuel mixture in the cylinders may detonate before it should, which will cause the engine to knock. Lack of engine oil, a coolant level that is too low and a broken coolant fan are all possible causes of overheating.

Carbon Build-up

    All gasolines have cleaning agents in them. Some, however, have less than others. This can cause carbon to build up inside the cylinder walls. This build-up can cause knocking. Switching gasoline brands or adding a detergent additive may solve the problem.

Spark Plugs

    Spark plugs are responsible for producing a spark as well as withdrawing heat from the combustion chamber. Each spark plug is designed to work within a certain heat range. If the plugs in your Blazer are not correct for your Blazer's engine, the spark plugs will not work properly and may cause engine knocking. Installing manufacturer-recommended spark plugs may stop the engine knock.

How to Troubleshoot a Ford Mustang Distributor

The distributor in the Ford Mustang triggers the ignition coil and then transmits the energy (spark) produced by the coil to the spark plugs at the proper time to ignite the compressed air/fuel mixture in the cylinders. Common failures of the Mustang's distributor include failure to trigger the coil, failure to trigger fuel injectors, failure to control the timing of the spark and failure to transmit the spark to the spark plug. Diagnosing these problems is a straightforward process of elimination through testing the possible causes of the failure.

Instructions

No spark

    1

    Remove a spark plug wire from a spark plug using a spark plug wire pliers to twist and pull the wire's boot until it unsnaps from the spark plug. Insert the terminal end of the spark tester into the plug wire and clip the ground wire of the tester to the engine block.

    2

    Have a helper try to start the engine while you observe the tester. Repeat this test for several spark plug wires. If a strong spark is present at most of the spark plug wires replace the wires. If no spark is present at any of the plug wires go to the next step.

    3

    Unplug the coil wire from the distributor cap. Attach the spark tester to the coil wire and engine block in the same manner as before. Have a helper again try to start the engine while you observe the spark tester. If spark is present at the tester replace the distributor cap and ignition rotor. If no spark is present go to the next step.

    4

    Unplug the coil wire from the ignition coil. Attach a test light to the engine block and hold the probe end of the test light within a 1/4-inch of the coil terminal. Have a helper try to start the engine while you observe the gap between the test light and coil terminal. If a bright, strong spark is present replace the coil wire. If no spark is present go to the next step.

    5

    Unplug the coil's electrical connector. Turn the ignition key to the run position and touch the probe end of the test light to the terminals in the electrical connector. One should light the test light indicating power is being supplied to the coil. If neither terminal lights the test light replace the ignition fuse. If power is supplied go to the next step.

    6

    Move the test light's clip from the engine block to the positive battery terminal. Touch the test light to the terminal in the electrical connector that did not light the test light. Have a helper try to start the engine while you observe the light. It should flash. If it does not flash replace the pick-up coil and ignition module in the distributor.

Timing and fuel injector control

    7

    Unplug the electrical connector from one of the fuel injectors. Insert the noid light into the electrical connector and have a helper try to start the engine. If the light does not flash replace the distributor's pick-up coil and ignition module.

    8

    Clamp the battery cables of the timing light to the battery and clip the pick-up of the timing light to the number one spark plug wire. The number of plug wire is the front wire on the passenger-side of the engine in the Ford V-6 and V-8, and the front wire on the L-4, engines.

    9

    Start the engine and aim the timing light at the timing marks on the harmonic balancer located behind the crankshaft pulley. Observe the timing marks as you open the throttle quickly. The timing marks should move indicating the distributor is advancing the timing in response to the throttle. If the timing doesn't move replace the distributor's ignition module and pick-up coil.

How to Hook Up an ECM in a Nissan Quest

How to Hook Up an ECM in a Nissan Quest

If the Engine Control Module (ECM) has malfunctioned in your Nissan Quest, then you may want to replace it yourself. Professional repair estimates for the ECM can range from $2,000 to $3,000, depending on the repair shop. The Nissan Quest is notorious for having ECM problems because of the location of the ECM. The device is located under the windshield cowl, thus all water and rain drains directly onto this electronic device, causing it to rust and malfunction. Warranties usually do not cover rust problems, so many Quest owners have to foot the bill for an ECM repair.

Instructions

    1

    Detach the negative cable on your battery and release the latch and wiring clips on the old ECM connectors. Use work gloves if you are concerned about protecting your hands from heat and dirt.

    2

    Remove the bolts that hold the ECM in place. The bolts are 10 mm, so use a small wrench for this task.

    3

    Pull out the ECM and set it aside. You should be able to see the rust and damage to your old ECM.

    4

    Protect your new ECM by painting the top cover with the water-resistant, ceramic paint. Be careful not to paint over the contact points for the ECM connectors. If you do, your new ECM won't work.

    5

    Secure your new ECM in place with new 10 mm bolts.

    6

    Connect the ECM connectors to the battery and latch the security clip underneath the ECM.

    7

    Reinstall the battery. Make sure the negative connection of the battery is securely fastened in place.

    8

    Crank your Nissan's engine, and reset your radio and clock settings. The new module will not have this saved information. Drive at a moderate pace to allow the module to acclimate itself to your driving environment.

What Happens if Your Stabilizer Link Bushings Are Worn?

The stabilizer bar is known by many names on both the left and right sides of The Pond; sway and anti-sway bar, roll and anti-roll bar, among others. But no matter what you call it, this vital suspension component acts as something of a counter-balance for your car's main springs. Over time, the bushings that connects it to the chassis can wear out and fail, reducing its effectiveness.

Body Lean

    Your car's main springs -- be they coil, leaf or air -- work by pushing each of the wheels toward the ground. When you turn, the springs on the outside of the turn will compress to control body movement, while the springs on the other side will expand. The problem with relying solely upon the main springs is that the springs on the inside of the turn will attempt to push the car over, thus negating the effects of the outer springs and encouraging body lean.

Sway Bar Function

    The sway bar is a roughly U-shaped, spring-steel bar that connects the wheel on the right side of the car to that on the left. The "top tips" of the U connect to the suspension just behind the wheels, and the long "base" of the U goes through circular brackets mounted to the chassis. It pivots freely inside these circular brackets, riding inside of cylindrical bushings or "isolators" made of rubber or plastic. When the car body attempts to lean, the rising inside portion of the body tries to bend the bar, and the bar resists body roll by pushing back.

Isolator Function

    The isolator's primary purpose is to keep vibrations from the suspension from snaking up into the car's body and rattling your fillings lose. But it does something else, too; it momentarily slows the action of the sway bar, allowing a degree or so of body roll before the rubber compresses and the sway bar bends.

Bushing Softening

    Rubber components work kind of like brake pads, converting motion on a large scale into heat spread throughout the rubber's molecular structure. Over time, constant heating and cooling will break the molecular strands that hold the rubber together, causing it to permanently soften. When that happens, the sway bar engagement will slow, allowing for more body lean before the sway bar resists movement. On practical terms, the extra body lean caused by bad sway bar bushings is very subtle; you might not even notice it apart from the fact that the car feels a bit sloppier and more vague during cornering and quick lane changes.

Bushing Tearing, Hardening and Damage

    Not all bushings get softer over time; some actually dry out, get hard and shrink slightly. Hard, shrunken bushings will allow more immediate slop in terms of body roll, followed by a sudden cessation of body roll and changes in handling balance during cornering. The same thing will happen if the bushing actually tears or falls out of the bracket, but to a much greater degree. If left unchecked, the sudden and violent engagement of the sway bar can damage the sway bar end links, or break the D-shaped bracket that hold it to the frame.

Sabtu, 25 Mei 2013

Which CV Joint Is Clicking if Turning Left?

Which CV Joint Is Clicking if Turning Left?

The CV joint is responsible for transferring the power of the engine to the wheel. The CV joint is made up of numerous bearings that allow the wheel to flex and turn as needed. However, these bearings can wear, requiring the joint to be replaced.

Left Turn Clicking

    Most often, the CV joint that is clicking when making a left turn is the right outer CV joint as the right wheel is under the most stress. However, the left outer CV joint might also make a clicking noise during a left turn if it is very worn.

CV Joint Testing

    To determine which joint is bad, listen to the CV joint while driving left slowly in a tight circle. Bad CV joints will typically make a loud popping or clicking, but at low speeds the noise may not be as loud. If needed, a helper listening outside of the car can aid in identifying which side is making noise.

Safety

    When a CV joint is clicking, it is a sign that the joint is worn and needs to be replaced. Though a CV joint may last for some time while clicking, a failed CV joint can cause a loss of steering and result in a serious accident. Whenever a CV joint is heard clicking, it should be promptly replaced for safety.

Jumat, 24 Mei 2013

How to Test a Window Motor

How to Test a Window Motor

Window motors on vehicles frequently fail as they age, resulting in seized and malfunctioning electric windows. In some cases, this is an electric circuit problem, but most of the time, the motor itself fails due to normal wear and tear. Because of the cost involved with labor and diagnostics, testing a window motor yourself saves money and requires only a few basic tools and some time.

Instructions

Testing a Window Motor

    1

    Disconnect the car's battery cables, starting with the negative cable first, then the positive. This prevents you from accidentally shorting out electrical components if wires or connections come in contact with each other at any time.

    2

    Remove the screws holding the door paneling on the door in which the motor is contained.This will vary among vehicles, but will typically require only a flathead and Phillips-head screwdriver. You may also have to remove the window control switch panel, depending on the vehicle, but can be done with the same tools.

    3

    Remove the motor from the window regulator rail. This is the assembly which helps the window slide up and down. This will require the use of a socket set and typically involves the removal of several bolts holding the motor to the window regulator assembly. This protects the window from stress during motor testing.

    4

    Unplug the wire connectors attached to the window motor. These connections will typically be male and female connectors which simply pull away from each other, but occasionally the wires are screwed into the motor itself or use a simple clip which can be easily separated. At this point, the motor should be completely unattached from the door.

    5

    Connect the positive terminals of the jumper wires to the positive terminal on the 12-volt battery and to one connector on the motor. Using jumper wires with alligator clips is one of the easiest ways to connect the wires to the motor. It does not matter which connector on the motor the positive end of the jumper wire is placed on, since the motor is designed to operate in both directions and thus uses two different current directions.

    6

    Connect one negative end of the jumper wire to the negative terminal on the 12-volt battery. The other negative end may be placed on the remaining connector on the window motor. If the motor turns over freely at constant speed, then it's working properly. If the motor does not spin at all, or does so sporadically, it must be replaced.

Reasons for Manual Transmission Reverse Failure

Reasons for Manual Transmission Reverse Failure

Manual transmissions have many complex parts which can malfunction and cause serious problems with the vehicle if left unchecked. Replacing the transmission can cost from $1,800 to $3,500 in most areas of the country as of 2010. In general, the more expensive the car, the more it will cost to replace the transmission. When the reverse gear fails, there are several possible causes for this malfunction.

Lubricant and Fluid

    Leaking rear seals can be a minor problem; however, if left untreated, the problem can become significant. If the transmission is just a couple of quarts low, it will not function properly, if at all. Manual transmissions are hydraulic and require fluid to operate efficiently. Reverse failure due to lubrication can be prevented by changing the transmission fluid regularly. Making sure that the oil used is correct, as stated in the owner's manual, is just as important.

Pilot Bearing

    The pilot bearing, or bushing, supports the forward end of the input shaft of the transmission. It also keeps the clutch disc centered and allows the shaft to rotate properly. If this small part becomes worn or disintegrates, it will cause metal fatigue. Eventually, the transmission's gears will weaken, and the transmission will fail completely.

Shifter Cable

    The shifter cable controls the position of the transmission gear shift. The end of this cable nearest the transmission is constantly exposed to high temperatures and engine fluids. As a result, it will begin to deteriorate, often before the cable itself. While the ends of the cable are inexpensive to replace, waiting to replace them may require replacement of the whole cable which can be more time-consuming and expensive.

How to Troubleshoot a Jeep Liberty's Transmission

How to Troubleshoot a Jeep Liberty's Transmission

Chrysler introduced the Jeep Liberty in 2002. There are two versions of the Liberty. The KJ series which was produced from 2002 to 2004, and the KK series introduced in 2005 to the present. There are four wheel drive models and two wheel drive models. Two types of transmissions are available for the Jeep Liberty, a five speed manual transmission, and a 4 speed automatic. The steps to troubleshooting transmission problems depend on which type of transmission is in the vehicle. It must be noted that automatic transmissions generally require the services of a professional mechanic.

Instructions

Manual Transmissions

    1

    Start the engine and check for noise in neutral. If the transmission is noisy while the Jeep idles in neutral, the input shaft bearing, countershaft bearings may be worn. The main drive gear bearing or countershaft also may be damaged.

    2

    Check for noise in a particular gear. This indicates worn, damaged or chipped gear teeth. The synchronizer for the gear may also be worn or damaged.

    3

    Drive the vehicle and check for slippage in high gears. Loose transmission to clutch housing bolts, or misalignment of the transmission housing cause these issues.

    4

    Drive the vehicle and check for noise in all gears. Insufficient gear oil due to a leak can cause the gears to chatter. Check the transmission oil seal or vehicle speed sensor O-ring.

Automatic Transmissions

    5

    Drive the vehicle and check for gear slippage, noise or no drive in forward or reverse gears. Lack of automatic transmission fluid can cause these issues.

    6

    Check if the engine starts in gears other than Park or Neutral or moves while in Park. This indicates that the shift cable is mis-adjusted. Check the shift gear linkage for damage.

    7

    Check the Brake/Transmission shift Interlock Solenoid. Turn the ignition key to Run and attempt to shift out of park without without stepping on the brake pedal. If the gear shift button can depress, the solenoid is defective.

How to Reset Trouble Codes on a 2003 Impala

How to Reset Trouble Codes on a 2003 Impala

If you need to reset the trouble codes on your 2003 Chevrolet Impala, then the hardest work is behind you. An Impala's trouble codes are a result of the diagnostic system detecting a problem and activating the "Service Engine Soon" light on the dashboard. Having already determined the issue and fixed it, you now need to clear the codes from the system. If you do not resolve the problem, however, the "Service Engine Soon" light will reappear.

Instructions

    1

    Open the driver's side door and locate the On-Board Diagnostic port beneath the Impala's dashboard and steering wheel.

    2

    Plug an OBD-II scanner into the Impala's diagnostic port. Some scanners will instantly turn on once a connection is sensed while others must be manually switched on. If your scanner needs to be turned on, locate the power button and press it.

    3

    Insert the key into the Impala's ignition and turn it to the "Accessories" position. The connection between the diagnostic system and the scanner should almost be instant, and the trouble codes should appear on the scanner's screen.

    4

    Verify that no new trouble codes have appeared since you made the repairs.

    5

    Hit the "Clear" button on the scanner. This will erase the trouble codes and reset the "Service Engine Soon" light.

Kamis, 23 Mei 2013

Troubleshooting a 1994 Grand Cherokee Turn Signal

Turn signals operate in a universal manner. Electrical signal is pulled from the charging system and routed through the ignition switch. The signal goes through a turn signal relay, which operates as an interrupt switch, before connecting to the light. The interrupt allows the light to turn on and off in cadence. Troubleshooting the turn signal in a 1994 Jeep Grand Cherokee follows the same path as for other vehicles. The only difference is the location of the components.

Instructions

    1

    Start the vehicle and engage both driver's side and passenger's side turn signals. Monitor the activity in the lights.

    2

    Replace the bulb if the front or rear light is blinking rapidly with no activity from the opposing light on the same side of the vehicle. The turn signal assembly bolts from behind the lamp inside the engine. You will have to unbolt the headlight assembly with a ratchet to reach the turn signal bolts. Unbolt the headlight and the turn signal and pull them away from the vehicle. The bulb twists out of the assembly, and you have to push and twist the bulb to get it out of the socket.

    3

    Remove and inspect the fuse if the signals do not come on at all. The fuse is located in the Power Distribution Center (a labeled, black box with fuses near the battery in the engine). Number 16 is the turn signal fuse. Replace if the metal strip in the fuse is corroded, burnt, or broken. The fuse will pull right out with needle-nose pliers.

    4

    Replace the turn signal relay (flasher). The relay is located to the left of the steering column on the firewall above the brake pedal. Two silver cylinders about one inch wide are side by side. The turn signal flasher is on the right. You can verify this by turning on the hazard lights. The hazard lights use the other cylinder which will click when the hazards are activated. Replace this if turning on the turn signal results in no clicking at the relay and the lights do not light up.

    5

    Test the turn signal switch. Remove the steering column cover using a screwdriver and inspect the wiring to the switch. Tighten any loose connections. Replace the switch if no other faults are found.

My Headlights Won't Work

My Headlights Won't Work

Both headlights on your car are out and won't come on -- it's time to troubleshoot! If both headlights are out at the same time, the problem is likely to be electrical. To troubleshoot, start with the easiest thing to fix and work from there. Even if you manage to get the lights working again, check other potential problems to prevent a recurrence.

Instructions

    1

    Inspect the headlights to make sure the filaments are not broken. Remove each headlight from its housing and check to see if the filaments are intact. If not, replace the damaged bulb. Don't touch any part of a Halogen replacement with your fingers except the base. Oil from your fingers on the glass bulb can cause the headlight to fail prematurely. If both lights are out, replace them both. Check to see if the new headlines are working.

    2

    Check the headlight fuses in the car's fuse box. Open the fuse box and check the headlight fuse. If the fuse shows as burned out, replace it and test the headlights again.

    3

    Check the connectors, wiring harness and socket into which the headlight bulbs are plugged. Look for rust or corrosion around the connectors and wire harnesses. Also, look for wires that have pulled loose. Replace the connector harnesses, wiring or sockets if there is any sign of damage, wear, looseness or corrosion. Make sure the ground wire from the light socket housing to the car frame is making a good connection.

    4

    Pull out the headlight relay if the headlights still do not work. Shake it. If the relay rattles, it needs to be replaced. If the system uses a control module instead of a headlight relay, you'll need to consult your vehicle repair manual to identify the module. Check to make sure power is reaching the module. If it is and the headlights still don't work, replace the control module. The lights should come on.

    5

    Replace the headlight switch if there is no power reaching the headlight relay or control module. The headlight switch is probably broken and needs to be replaced. Get help with this one from your dealer, especially if the switch is in the steering column. You could set off the airbag and injure yourself or damage the vehicle.

Rabu, 22 Mei 2013

How to Troubleshoot Two-Stroke Engines: Gas From Exhaust

How to Troubleshoot Two-Stroke Engines: Gas From Exhaust

A two-stroke engine with gas leaking from the engine is a serious problem. Not only does the situation mean that raw gasoline is not being consumed by the engine combustion process, it also creates a risky situation since a hot engine can ignite gasoline outside of the cylinder. The problem is typically caused by a leakage somewhere in the system, starting from the gas tank all the way to the cylinder itself. An owner or mechanic will need to follow a process of elimination to find the cause.

Instructions

    1

    With the engine running look for a fuel leak or signs of raw gasoline smell outside of the engine. Turn the engine off and confirm the fuel is still leaking from the exhaust. Use a socket wrench or Crescent wrench to disconnect the exhaust from the cylinder exhaust stub or manifold. Tap the exhaust pipe free with a rubber mallet when unbolted.

    2

    Look for gasoline inside the stub or manifold. Reinstall the exhaust and tighten it with a socket wrench. Pull the ignition cap off the spark plug and use a socket wrench to loosen and remove the spark plug. Look for signs of unburned fuel inside the cylinder. Use a socket wrench to loosen and remove the cylinder if raw fuel is identified.

    3

    Look inside the engine case with the cylinder removed for fuel pooling inside the crankshaft area -- this identifies a leak further up the system in the carburetor. Turn the fuel flow on to see if the leak still continues -- the pooling should increase if so. Turn it off again. The pooling should stop unless the fuel valve is broken. Reinstall the cylinder with a new cylinder gasket and tighten it with a socket wrench.

    4

    Use a screwdriver to unscrew the fuel line from the carburetor. Pull the line off and hold it in your hand with a shop rag. Examine the end of the line to see if the fuel is still flowing with the the fuel valve in the off position. Turn the valve on and off again to see if it works or if flow still continues; this would be a sign of a partially bad valve.

    5

    Use a screwdriver to disconnect the carburetor from the intake hose and its Banjo clamp. Unbolt the carburetor with a socket wrench or Crescent wrench if bolted directly to an intake manifold. Turn the carburetor upside down when free and unscrew the bottom of the carburetor float bowl with a screwdriver or Crescent wrench.

    6

    Take out the carburetor float and float needle when exposed with the bottom removed. Replace the float needle with a new one. Reinstall the new needle and floats and reinstall the carburetor bottom. Reattach the carburetor right side up to the manifold hose and secure it again with the Banjo clamp tightened by a screwdriver. Test the engine and see if a leak still occurs.

How to Reset the Check Engine Light on the 2000 Acura 3.5RL

For all 2000 model year Acuras, the check engine light is part of the vehicle's second generation on-board diagnostic computer. The OBD-II system became universalized in 1996, by order of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Resetting the system requires an OBD-II handheld device, which is commonly referred to as a code reader or a scanner.

Instructions

    1

    Set up a connection between your OBD-II handheld scanner and the Acura's diagnostic system. Connect the handheld's cable with the Acura RL's Data Link Connector, which can be found beneath the dash near the left kick panel.

    2

    Switch your OBD-II handheld device on by either pressing the power button or letting the device switch itself on. All brands of OBD-II diagnostic handhelds are slightly different, so it is always for the better that you defer to the exact instructions found in the user's manual.

    3

    Place the key into the RL's ignition, turn to "On," and start the RL's electrical system. Some brands of diagnostic hardware also require the engine to be running.

    4

    Scan the Acura's OBD-II system, if your handheld is not preset to automatically do so. Press the appropriate buttons for a "scan" or "read" command, as detailed in your OBD-II scanner's manual.

    5

    Scroll through the codes on scanner's screen once they have been pulled from the OBD-II system. Ignore all codes listed with a "pending" status. These malfunctions have not triggered the Acura RL's check engine light. Make note of each trouble code.

    6

    Select each trouble code and press the "erase" or "clear" button.

    7

    Turn off all the running systems in the Acura RL. Disconnect the handheld from the RL's DLC outlet.

    8

    Wait a couple of minutes and then turn the RL's engine on again. Look at the check engine light. It should be dark.

Selasa, 21 Mei 2013

Instrument Panel Problem in a 1969 Mustang

Instrument Panel Problem in a 1969 Mustang

Owning a classic muscle car can be an exhilarating experience, but it is often not without some occasional frustrations. In 1969, materials and methods of Ford electric systems and components were somewhat primitive in comparison to more modern rigging. The actual appearance of the circuitry behind the instrument panel might confuse repair efforts, rather than shed any enlightenment. The gauges and indicator lights relied upon for safe operation can display problems that seem to defy logic. There are, as always, devils in the details, but some simple considerations can help get the ghosts out of the instrument panel of your 'Stang.

Running on Empty

    Erratic behavior of the fuel and temperature gauge may be the fault of a defective constant voltage regulator, or CVR. The regulator mounted on the back of the instrument panel is meant to cushion electrical inputs to the gauges. It functions to steady gauge readings that otherwise might react constantly to small variables, like sudden fuel movements in the gas tank when accelerating or turning corners. The regulator is no bigger than your thumb, and it can fail in different ways that may render some gauges inoperable or cause improbable readings.

Printed Circuits

    Electrical power is distributed to all the gauges and lights of the instrument panel by printed circuits. The metallic pathways are printed on a sheet of plastic and laminated with another sheet of the same material. The layers can separate over time and break the circuits where they pull apart. It may be possible to mend torn circuits with solder or wire, but changes in circuit resistance could damage components or cause an electrical fire in the dash. The most reliable remedy would be to replace the printed circuit plastic panel.

Lighting the Way

    The instrument panel lights are powered through the printed circuits and the small bulbs are subject to the same failures you might find in a string of Christmas lights. They can grow dim, or just stop working one by one. The lack of illumination may escape notice until it reaches a point where gauges are impossible to read at night. Some bulbs in certain locations are fitted with covers that color the exhibited light, while others are behind colored lenses, like the turn indicators. Replace all the bulbs at once to ensure even voltage distribution and uniform illumination.

Squeaking By

    Speedometer cable maintenance helps ensure longevity.
    Speedometer cable maintenance helps ensure longevity.

    A squeaking noise in the dash that seems to coincide with a quivering speedometer needle may be caused by the cable that actuates the gauge. The cable is contained in a housing that connects to the back of the instrument panel. When lubrication is lacking, the cable can distort and rub against the housing. Orthodox maintenance procedures require removal at the transmission end of the housing. However, you can disconnect the housing from the back of the instrument panel and spray a lubricant into the open end of the housing. Use the small red pipette, or straw, that comes with a can of cable lubricant to inject the product. Wipe off any excess grease to avoid contaminating the speedometer.

How to Troubleshoot an Auto Master Cylinder

How to Troubleshoot an Auto Master Cylinder

The master cylinder works like a pump, delivering brake fluid to the various brake components. Without it, no pressure would be available in the braking system to expand the brakes shoes or pads against the drums or rotors. The master cylinder needs to keep a tight internal seal, with no leaks. It can show failure in a number of ways, but luckily, detection can be made early, before it fails completely; the vehicle owner can spot the failure symptoms and prepare for an eventual repair or replacement.

Instructions

Brake System Inspection

    1

    Set the vehicle in "Park" and apply the emergency brake. Use a jack to lift the vehicle to a height that allows you to set two jack stands under one axis at a time. Use the tire iron to remove the wheels, then set them aside.

    2

    Inspect the wheel cylinders for leaks by gently pulling back the rubber boots. In the case of the front disk brakes, inspect the inside of the caliper, near the piston location. Check all the wheels in this manner. Any brake fluid leakage in these areas means that you can rule out failure of the master cylinder for now. If no leakage exists, the problem will point to the master cylinder.

    3

    Lower the vehicle and remove the stands. Open the hood. Remove the master cylinder reservoir cap and inspect the fluid level in the reservoir. There should be a line denoting the fill limit near the top. If no limit line exists, raise the level with new brake fluid until it reaches approximately 3/8 before the top lip of the reservoir. Good brake fluid quality shows with a clear liquid. If the fluid appears murky, muddy, milky or discolored in any way, it means it has been contaminated. Water condensation will be the most likely source of contamination. Since water has a different boiling point and gets hot at the wheel cylinders, it renders the brake fluid incapable of compressing completely. A full brake bleed remedies this situation.

    4

    Inspect the rear of the master cylinder, where it bolts to the power booster (the large circular canister on the firewall). Look for any brake fluid leakage that has run down the seam between the joint. Brake fluid contains highly corrosive chemicals and will blister paint, which might show on the surface of the brake booster. Any leakage here indicates the rear master cylinders seals have failed, and the master cylinder needs to be replaced.

    Check for leakage where the plastic fluid reservoir sits on top of the master cylinder. Grommets seal the joint at this junction, and sometimes they wear through due to corrosion. Any leakage down either side of the master cylinder body indicates grommet-seal failure. Replace the master cylinder.

    5

    Sit behind the wheel and start the engine. Without pumping the brake pedal, apply a steady but firm force on the pedal and note its travel. A brake pedal that continues to depress all the way to the floorboard means a leak has allowed the master cylinder to lose full pressure. Sometimes pumping the pedal several times will restore brake height, but it will always depress slowly to the floor. This type of leak can be caused by internal seals that have broken or worn and show no outwards signs of leakage. The most probable cause points to bad seals within the master cylinder, which requires a replacement.

    6

    Sit behind the wheel. Feel the condition of the brake pedal under your foot when you depress it. If it has a spongy or bouncy feeling, this means that air has somehow entered the brake line system or the master cylinder. There will not be a firm-hard pedal response. A brake bleed will solve a problem like this, provided all other brake components are functioning properly.

    7

    Check your dashboard for any brake light indicator warning light. If a code appear next to or in place of the brake warning light, look it up in your manual or in a trouble code reference book to identify the problem area.

Senin, 20 Mei 2013

How to Troubleshoot a 2000 Ford Explorer Engine Light

You are driving down the road and all of a sudden your "Check Engine" light turns on. There are a few things you can do to troubleshoot the "Check Engine" light while you are on the road: Remove the gas cap and place it back on and inspect the engine for any glaring issues such as smoke or steam. These things could cause the light to appear. If you do this and the light does not go away, there is only one cost effective and time-saving way to troubleshoot the "Check Engine" light on your 2000 Ford Explorer.

Instructions

    1

    Connect the onboard diagnostic code reader (OBDII) to the OBDII port located under the driver's side dash panel on your Explorer. You can purchase OBDII code readers at most auto part retailers. If you choose not to purchase a code readers, ask the salesperson if you can borrow the one they have so that you can test your vehicle.

    2

    Turn the ignition onto the auxiliary position. This turns on the Explorer's computer and the code reader.

    3

    Select "Read Trouble Codes" on the OBDII code reader. The OBDII will show you a code on the screen.

    4

    Compare the code shown on the OBDII scanner to a code deciphering book to determine what part on your engine caused the code. You can purchase the book at most auto part retail stores or you can look for an online website such as engine-light-help.com for a list of codes and what they mean.

How do I Troubleshoot the Fuel System in a 91 Dodge Pickup?

How do I Troubleshoot the Fuel System in a 91 Dodge Pickup?

In extreme temperatures, the fuel system of a 1991 Dodge pickup can have trouble operating properly. You may have to troubleshoot the fuel system in your '91 Dodge pickup on a particularly frigid or hot day. This is a relatively simple job, but it may require a trip to the auto parts store for some specialized tools. You should be able to finish this job within an hour or two.

Instructions

    1

    Find out your local weather conditions before taking any action. If the temperature is lower than 30 degrees, you may need to add an anti-icing product to your gas tank. In weather of 80 degrees or higher, try pouring cool water on the gas lines and fuel pump.

    2

    Add a small amount of gasoline to the fuel tank and turn the ignition again. Make sure your car is on a flat surface; if it is parked on an incline, the fuel injector may be taking in air rather than gasoline.

    3

    Check the spark plugs using an ignition tester. You can find ignition testers at almost any auto parts store. Attach a spark plug to the ignition tester and turn the car on; a spark should be produced in the gap between the spark plug and tester. If you do not see a spark, every spark plug in the car will need to be replaced.

    4

    Remove the gas line using a gas line disconnect tool; these tools can also be found at nearly any auto parts store. Place the fuel line in a see-through storage box and restart the car's engine. If you do not see gas coming out of the line when the engine is running, you will need to get the gas pump tested. If you cannot reach the gas line, take your car to a mechanic.

    5

    Remove your rubber gas hoses and carefully inspect them for weak spots or cracks. Any damaged gas hoses will need to be replaced.

Reasons for No Fuel Pressure on a 1996 Monte Carlo

Reasons for No Fuel Pressure on a 1996 Monte Carlo

The 1996 Chevrolet Monte Carlo has at least one recall and several technical service bulletins (TSB) published on the automobile about fuel pressure issues. The main reason for no fuel pressure in the Monte Carlo is attributed to the recall, which concerns a defective fuel pressure regulator, but there are many other things that can cause the Monte Carlo to have no fuel pressure.

Fuel Pressure Recall

    General Motors Company has a recall on the 1996 Chevrolet Monte Carlo because of a faulty fuel pressure regulator. The faulty fuel pressure regulator is one of the reasons that the Monte Carlo has no fuel pressure. The regulator was manufactured without an O-ring and retainer, creating the fuel line to leak gasoline and lose fuel pressure. The Monte Carlo will begin to misfire, hesitate or stall under normal diving conditions and will even fail to start. This regulator problem can also cause an engine fire and is the main reason the Monte Carlo has no fuel pressure. The Monte Carlo owner must take the vehicle into the dealership to have the fuel pressure regulator replaced.

Fuel Injectors Clogged

    The fuel injectors allow fuel to flow into the cylinders, which spark or ignite, pressing the pistons back down. A clogged fuel injector or clogged fuel injectors cause fuel to back up into the fuel pump and creates fuel pressure problems. The fuel injectors become clogged because of excessive debris flowing through the fuel filter and through the gas line. The Monte Carlo must have the fuel injectors cleaned in order to prevent the Monte Carlo from losing fuel pressure.

Restricted Fuel Flow

    Gasoline prevented from flowing freely throughout the fuel lines causes no fuel pressure, leading the Monte Carlo to stall or misfire. Several different reasons are attributed to this fuel pressure problem such as excessive debris in the fuel tank, in-line fuel filter clogged and clogged fuel strainer in the fuel pump. The Monte Carlo needs to be taken to the dealership or a qualified technician in order to have the fuel tank cleaned, replace the fuel filter or clean the fuel pump strainer.

1997 Dodge Intrepid Troubleshooting

1997 Dodge Intrepid Troubleshooting

The Dodge Intrepid is a full-size sedan manufactured between the 1993 and 2004 model years. Information compiled from RepairPal and TSB show that the most common trouble areas for the Intrepid are in the front suspension, air vents and power windows. When troubleshooting potential problems with this vehicle, give these areas special attention.

Instructions

    1

    Check the front-end struts should you encounter rattling noises while driving at low speeds. Replace if necessary.

    2

    Smell the air coming from the vents for a musty or moldy aroma. If present, clean and disinfect the A/C evaporator.

    3

    Examine the window for bends near the door frame. If found, the window lift plates (and possibly the window regulator) will need replacing.

Minggu, 19 Mei 2013

Vibration in My Ford Excursion Drive Shaft

A Ford Excursion is a full-sized SUV, produced from 2000 through 2005. An Excursion that develops vibrations might make you think of tire or brake problems. The drive shaft can also cause the SUV to vibrate.

Balance

    The drive-shaft balancing weights, while typically welded on, are susceptible to impact. Hitting something hard enough with your drive shaft might cause the weights to fall off, leading to an imbalanced drive shaft and vibration.

Damage

    Dents or bends in the body of the Excursion's drive shaft can cause a vibration. The vibration increases with the size of the dent or bend.

Universal Joints

    Universal joints connect the drive shaft to the transmission and the differential. U-joints sometimes loosen and cause a vibration in the drive shaft.

Repairing

    The only way to rectify loose U-joints is to replace them. A drive shaft with a dent large enough to create a vibration must be replaced as a whole. A dealership -- or a drive-shaft specialist --can re-balance the drive shaft.

How to Remove a Keyed Gas Cap

How to Remove a Keyed Gas Cap

Although they are not as predominant as they were in the mid to late 1980s, key lock gas caps for automobiles still exist. Before the times of advanced digital and solid state car alarms, locking gas caps were the first line of defense against would-be fuel thieves. Removal of key-operated gas caps can be a little tricky if you aren't used to using them. However, with a little practice you can remove locked gas caps like a pro.

Instructions

    1

    Pop the gas cover release on the inside of your car or truck.

    2

    Slip the correct key into your locking gas cap.

    3

    Turn the key, inside the gas cap lock, to the right.

    4

    Push down on the gas cap and turn it to the left, while you are turning key to the right until the gas cap catches the threads and begins to unscrew.

Can I Drive With a Bad Shift Solenoid?

Electronic transmissions are kind of like sharks; only those who have seen the inside of one really understand how they work, and they usually wish they didn't know. But knowing what you can get away with requires at least a functional understanding of the thing; how the mechanism works, where the hydraulics come in and how the solenoids orchestrate the whole thing.

Transmission Basics

    A transmission is three different systems all working together. The mechanical system -- composed of the input/output shafts, clutches and gears -- routes power from the engine to the driveshaft. A hydraulic system -- the pump and dozens of little fluid passages and valves -- controls the clutches, which determine what part of the gearset receives power. The electrical system -- the computer, sensors and solenoids -- controls the valves in the hydraulic system, and so dictate the transmission's shift points and shift firmness.

Transmission Design

    There are two basic types of electronic transmission systems: purpose-built electronic transmissions and those retrofitted to use electronic controls. Retrofit transmissions typically use a specialized valve body -- a series of fluid control passages -- that connects to solenoid-controlled valves. Transmissions like this may still have provisions for limited hydraulic control over the shift points and firmness, but odds are that yours doesn't. More sophisticated, purpose-built electronic transmissions will function no better without its solenoids than you would function without a central nervous system.

Solenoid Function

    Transmissions typically have one less solenoid than they have gears. For instance, a four-speed transmission will generally have three solenoids; one for the first-to-second gear shift, another for the second-to-third gear shift and a third for the third-to-fourth gear shift. Failure of any one of these solenoids will result in a loss of fluid control during that shift event. So, a transmission with a dead two-to-three solenoid will shift into second gear, but not to third or fourth. It will work fine in those first two gears, but only in the first two gears.

Can You Drive It?

    The short answer is that, yes, you can usually drive a car with a bad shift solenoid. Granted, it might not shift past a particular gear, but you should be able to drive it for a short period of time without causing any serious damage. Fluid pressure control should continue to function in the gear with the working solenoid, but you should avoid putting any serious stress on the transmission -- towing or drag racing -- just in case. Of course, all of this assumes that your particular transmission doesn't use a solenoid to engage first gear, and that the first gear solenoid didn't go bad. If it did, then you'll know right away because the car won't move.

How to Prevent Marine Vapor Lock

How to Prevent Marine Vapor Lock

During certain conditions, any marine vessel can experience a vapor lock. Vapor lock occurs when the fuel in tanks, lines or carburetors reaches a boiling point that causes vaporization inside a confined space, such as a carburetor float bowl or fuel lines. Heat, and in some cases the grade of gasoline used, causes vapor lock. Vapor lock can be recognized by certain negative engine performance characteristics, which include hard starting after a "WOT" (wide-open-throttle) run, hesitation and stall upon acceleration, overheating due to insufficient cooling and pinging or knocking. Preventing vapor lock involves some inspection and possibly retrofitting some of the vessel's on-board components.

Instructions

    1

    Consider whether you use gas that contains heavy amounts of ethanol (a gas oxygenator), winter-grade fuel or additives that contain alcohol in your marine engine. Alcohol leans out the properties of fuel, leading to a lean mixture to the carburetor. Leaned carburetors allow the engine to run excessively hot.

    2

    Buy only small quantities of gasoline that you will use immediately. Store extra gasoline for no more than 90 days. Do not use any gasoline stored for more than 90 days. Dispose of old gasoline or gasoline that has a pungent smell of varnish and gum. If you have gasoline in the tank that has high ethanol content, purchase high-octane gas to add to it, and use the high octane blend until you purge the tank of the old fuel.

    3

    Avoid using fuel that has a Reid vapor pressure rating between 11 RVP and 15 RVP. Switch to a fuel that has 8 RVP to 10 RVP. Consult your owner's manual for the recommended octane and RVP-rated fuel for your craft.

    4

    Inspect all of your fuel lines and hoses for evidence of sharp bends, kinks, cracks or loose fittings. Replace such lines and hoses with those that have smooth-bore interior lining, that have the correct pressure rating and manufacturer's recommended diameter.

    5

    Measure the circumference of fuel hoses and lines with a tape rule. Divide the circumference by 3.14, then subtract the hose lining thickness. Small diameter lines and hoses cause restriction.

    6

    Use your hands or an end wrench to loosen and remove your water separator bowl and dump the sedimentary water. If the fuel filter has not been changed according to recommended intervals, replace it with a new cartridge, using a filter wrench to remove it. Screw the new filter on by hand. Use an end wrench to unscrew the brass inlet fuel line connection at the carburetor and check the cone or filter screen for clogs. Clean or replace the in-line fuel filter.

    7

    Check the engine cowl (case cover) for clogged vents. Make sure all the engine cowl vents are opened and unobstructed. Replace the air filter or spark arrestor if it appears clogged, oil-soaked or deteriorated. A clogged air filter or spark arrestor disallows cool air into the engine, which causes overheating.

    8

    Use a screwdriver to adjust the idle mixture screws on your carburetor. Enrich the mixture by turning the screws outward until the engine begins to stumble. Turn the idle mixture screws inward slightly to obtain a richer mixture. A richer mixture will cool the engine temperature.

    9

    Inspect your cooling system. Replace the seawater pump impeller at the prescribed maintenance intervals. A hot engine will cause the fuel in the lines or carburetor to peculate or vaporize, causing vapor lock. If the water pump impeller blades have worn down, they can not push enough water through the system to adequately bring down the temperature.

    10

    Make sure all fuel lines and hoses do not mount or sit in proximity to the exhaust manifold of the engine. Heat from exhaust manifolds will boil the fuel and cause air pockets, starving the engine of liquid fuel. Reroute all hoses and lines a safe distance from the exhaust manifolds.

    11

    Avoid using WOT on very hot days, especially when pulling heavy gear, passenger loads or skiers. The combination of high outside temperature and constant high acceleration will overheat the engine and vaporize the fuel. Constantly monitor the engine temperature gauge for warning signs of overheating. Shut the engine down and let it cool for 2 or 3 hours before restarting after you have suffered a vapor lock condition.

    12

    Change the oil when you notice a higher than normal running engine temperature. Oil that has lost its viscosity will create friction with the major engine components and add additional heat to the engine.

Sabtu, 18 Mei 2013

Why Are Strong Fumes Coming From My Car?

Why Are Strong Fumes Coming From My Car?

Though vehicles that have diesel or high-performance engines often emit some strong fumes, this signals a repair issue in the vast majority of automobiles. Abnormal car emissions are generally black or have a rotten egg or gasoline odor.

Faulty Fuel Pressure Regulator

    A faulty fuel pressure regulator can cause strong fumes and black smoke. This part is responsible for maintaining correct fuel pressure; a sudden increase or decrease in fuel pressure, in addition to the fumes, points to this diagnosis.

Catalytic Converter Failure

    The purpose of a catalytic converter is to decrease emission toxicity caused by the engine's gasoline burning process. Fumes resembling a rotten egg smell, combined with a decrease in engine power, result from a damaged or contaminated catalytic converter.

Exhaust System Leak

    If fumes are noticeable in the passenger compartment when the heater or air conditioner is used, then an exhaust system leak is likely. Leaks occur in the manifold gaskets, in the muffler or in the car's undercarriage area.

How to Troubleshoot a 1996 Ford Contour Engine

How to Troubleshoot a 1996 Ford Contour Engine

Troubleshooting the engine in a a Ford Contour can be a challenge if you don't know where to start. Since the Contour uses the Environmental Protection Agency's standardized On-Board Diagnostics-II system, however, the process can be streamlined. The Contour's OBD-II computer tracks malfunctions, and if you can access the system, you can pull a history of these malfunctions.

Instructions

    1

    Connect your OBD-II handheld device to the Contour's Data Link Connector. This outlet is beneath the dashboard on the driver's side. OBD-II handheld devices differ by brand and design. Your particular device may switch on immediately or you may have to push the power button.

    2

    Start the Contour's electrical system. Some handhelds, especially older ones, may require you to run the engine.

    3

    Look at the device's display screen. If your device is programmed for automatic code retrieval, the OBD-II codes will be displayed. Otherwise, enter a "Scan" command; this process also differs by brand of device. For precise instructions, look up the procedure in your device's user manual.

    4

    Hand copy the codes off the device's screen. Look first for codes that start with the letter "P." These powertrain codes deal with both the engine and the fuel system. Codes starting with other letters can be safely ignored for the moment but you will have to deal with them at some point. While making a list, place the "pending" powertrain codes at the bottom. While these are still recorded malfunctions, they have not occurred enough to merit "trouble" status in the OBD-II system. Always troubleshoot "trouble" codes first. They are causing the Ford Contour's "Check Engine" light to become active.

    5

    Locate meanings and explanations for the OBD-II codes. Consult your user manual first. There will be a list of OBD-II definitions there. Ford uses supplemental OBD-II codes and they probably will not be in the manual. The cheapest way to find these codes is through the Internet. Once you have located meanings for the OBD-II codes on your list, copy them down as well.

    6

    Open the Contour's engine compartment and troubleshoot the engine based upon your list. Go through all the trouble codes first and follow up by investigating the pending codes. Start your investigation by looking at an OBD-II coding decription and investigate the areas connected to it. For example, if you are investigating Ford OBD-II code P1444, the description is: "Purge Flow Sensor Circuit Input Low." Examine the purge flow sensor first and broaden out to the fuel system connected to it.

How to Check & Repair an Engine Light in an Auto

How to Check & Repair an Engine Light in an Auto

Check engine lights are federally mandated and required in vehicles. The check engine light (which in some vehicles is called the service engine light) may appear when your car's computer system has detected a glitch in your vehicle. Problems with your car can be as minor as needed maintenance or as major as transmission issues. It is very important to address check engine lights and to remember that bypassing or disconnecting check engine lights is illegal and against the federal emissions law.

Instructions

Checking the Check Engine Light

    1

    Make sure that your gas cap is tightly screwed on. In some newer model vehicles, the check engine light may appear if your gas cap is loose.

    2

    Call and visit your local auto parts store. Many of these stores will check the trouble codes that cause the check engine light for free. You could also purchase the same diagnostic code reader that the stores use.

    3

    Fix the problem that the code reader is defining. The check engine light will go off on its own if the car is properly repaired.

Resetting the Check Engine Light

    4

    Ask the service station where you get your car serviced to reset your light if it was on for something like an oil change or a tune-up. Many of these stations will do this for free if you received car service at their facilities.

    5

    Use a code scanner, and clear the codes. This is the most proper method for resetting the light.

    6

    Disconnect the battery, and reconnect it after a few minutes. This will result in your preset radio channels being lost and the OBD-II monitors being reset. If you do use this method, you may clear some memory functions, and the car's computer will have to relearn them.

How to Fix an Overheating Problem in a Range Rover Model 98

How to Fix an Overheating Problem in a Range Rover Model 98

The Range Rover's aluminum V8 started out as a Buick design from the late 1950s. Buick sold the V8 design to Rover in the late 1960s, then re-developed it into a V6. That engine later evolved to become the 3800-series V6 that GM uses to this day. However, Rover continued to use the original block casting and its 1950s technology all the way through the 1990s -- something to think about when your truck starts to get a little hot under the collar.

Instructions

    1

    Drive the truck to determine when the overheating problem occurs. If the truck tends to overheat at idle, then you could have a bad cooling fan, malfunctioning thermostat, or low coolant level. If the overheating occurs at speed or under heavy-duty use conditions, park the truck and proceed to the next step.

    2

    Reach under the hood while the truck is overheating and gently lay the palm of your hand on the upper radiator hose. Be careful -- it's going to be very hot. Now, reach under the truck and feel the lower radiator hose; odds or it will feel significantly cooler than the upper hose. A certain temperature differential here is normal, but you have a problem if the upper hose is almost too hot to touch and the lower hose remains slightly above ambient temperature. Proceed to the next step.

    3

    Tow your truck to a radiator shop and have them replace the radiator. Radiator fluid becomes corrosive with age, and will begin to leach aluminum from the the engine and deposit it in the radiator core. The aluminum builds up, clogs the radiator and causes the truck to overheat at speed. The radiator may be salvageable, but be prepared to buy a new one and pay to have it installed.

    4

    Have the radiator and coolant system flushed with an aluminum-block-compatible coolant flush. Flushing involves draining the cooling system, pouring radiator flush into the radiator, running the car for ten minutes with the heater in the full-on position, allowing the car to cool and draining the coolant again. This procedure will eliminate and/or neutralize build-up and old fluid in the system.

    5

    Re-fill the radiator with a phosphate-free antifreeze. All antifreezes will leach aluminum ions away from the block. This type of corrosion is normal and won't cause any serious problems. However, the phosphate used in many types of anti-freeze will combine with the loose aluminum ions to form a substance similar to sand. This "sand" is what clogs your cooling system and kills the radiator, so using a phosphate-free antifreeze is vital for this application. Almost all traditional yellow or green antifreezes use phosphates, so opt instead for a European-spec organic acid antifreeze.

Why Is an Alternator Hot?

Why Is an Alternator Hot?

While alternators may look small and ubiquitous enough not to merit any serious attention, the simple fact is these little powerhouses are serious pieces of equipment. While some heat is an inevitable part of any alternator's life, odds are good that thermal energy excess that's enough to cook a small chicken will prove a harbinger of an alternator's untimely demise.

Alternators 101

    Passing a magnet through a coil of wire -- or moving a coil of wire within a stationary magnetic field -- causes the magnet to latch onto electrons in the wire and "drag" them through the wire. This movement of electrons is electricity, and there are two types: direct current that flows through a wire in one direction, such as water through a hose, and alternating current that vibrates back and forth in the wire. An alternator is essentially a ring of magnets -- oriented north-south-north-south -- spinning inside a coil of wire inside the alternator case. This induces an alternating current flow in the coil; the alternator uses a set of diodes called a rectifier to turn it into a useable DC signal.

Diode Heat

    The diodes in the rectifier are kind of like one-way valves for electricity. Remember that the electron movement in the alternator coils moves back-and-forth, but battery power flows linearly like water. To convert the AC signal to DC, engineers place an inward-facing diode on one end of the coil wire and an outward-pointing diode on the other. The "vibrating" AC signal thus can flow in through the negative and out through the positive, but never the other way around. While this arrangement works, that back-flowing electrical energy has to go somewhere. Energy trying to flow backward slams into the diodes and generates heat. The more power the alternator has to put out, the more energy the diodes capture and the more heat the alternator produces.

Alternator Overload and Internal Shorts

    Overloading is the likely root cause behind any kind of alternator overheating. Excess power amperage forces more heat to build up in the rectifier diodes; if heat builds faster than the alternator can get rid of it, you end up with a scorched alternator. Unless your alternator just had very weak diodes to begin with -- a possibility -- odds are that overloading severe enough to fry the alternator is the result of some sort of external short circuit. Internal short circuits resulting from fused wires are a possibility. To test for an internal short without a multimeter, turn the engine and key to the off position and hold a hacksaw or reciprocating saw blade to the alternator. If it sticks, then your alternator's pulling current and producing a magnetic field when it shouldn't be; along with a chronically dead battery, this is one sure-fire sign of an internal short.

External Shorting and Output

    External shorts come in all varieties, from those that directly affect the alternator to one in the car's electrical system itself. With a fully charged batteries, a cold engine and all accessories off, the alternator shouldn't be putting out more than eight to 15 amps of current. Any more than that and you've got something pulling current when it shouldn't be. Under no circumstances should your alternator's output read more than 15 volts or less than 11; either one indicates something wrong in the unit. Check the alternator's power output wire to ensure it's isolated from the case, A bad battery connection, bad ground or internal short in the battery itself can all cause the alternator to run warm. Your alternator itself may work fine, but high-draw faults and accessories -- here's looking at you, 4000-watt amplifier -- can cause the rectifiers to overheat. And once one goes, the rest are sure to fall like dominoes in a hurricane.

Jumat, 17 Mei 2013

How to Tell If Your Timing Belt Needs Replacement

How to Tell If Your Timing Belt Needs Replacement

The average timing belt is designed to last roughly 100,000 miles. This time can lessen with excessive driving, such as averaging more than 10,000 miles per year. Checking for signs of wear and knowing the driving conditions and life of the vehicle can help you determine when the is best time to replace the timing belt. Because of the nature of the timing belt's job, essentially regulating the engine, repairing a timing belt is rarely an option and most mechanics will advise against it.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood, with the vehicle turned off, and locate the timing belt. Visually observe the belt, making note of whether there are obvious signs of wear such as drying, cracking or fraying of the edges. Also note the mileage on the vehicle's odometer; if the mileage reads in excess of 100,000 miles traveled and these are known to be the original miles on the vehicle, the mileage alone could be reason enough to have the timing belt replaced.

    2

    Start the vehicle and let the engine run idle. If the engine has started running hotter, or idling louder and possibly vibrating or shaking the vehicle, this could be indicative of a timing belt going bad. Additionally, some mechanics mention knocking or ticking noises from the engine when the timing belt is going bad.

    3

    Drive the vehicle in a small area, not on the street, to assess whether the vehicle is backfiring. This is an unmistakable gunshot-like noise that sometimes occurs, especially in older vehicles, when the timing belt is going bad. This occurs most often when decelerating. When the accelerator is stepped on, if the engine revs fast or slow compared to "usual" and relative to the pressure applied by the driver's foot, this could be a symptom of the timing belt being off. In other words, the timing belt is running too fast or too slow and is affecting the engine overall.

How to Troubleshoot 2001 Ford Excursion Fuel Filter Leaking

The 2001 Ford Excursion was produced with three different engine options: the 5.4 L V-8, a 6.8 L V-10, and a 7.3 L turbo diesel V-8. The Excursion was equipped with four-wheel disc brakes, including two ventilated discs in the front. The curb weight of the 2001 Excursion averaged 4,037 lbs., and the truck could haul or tow an additional 3,200 lbs. Checking a fuel filter leak on an Excursion is the same process for the 5.4 L and the 6.8 L, but varies slightly with the 7.3 L diesel.

Instructions

5.4 L or 6.8 L Gasoline Engine

    1

    Slide under the truck on the driver's side until you can see the fuel filter. The fuel filter is located just inside the large chassis rail. Inspect the fuel filter for moisture on or around the fuel filter body.

    2

    Move or wiggle the fuel lines that lead to the fuel filter. There are two lines on the filter, and both have a simple snap-on design, which allows for ease of removal and installation. When wiggling the fuel lines on either end of the filter, visually inspect the filter and lines for any drips or fuel leaks. The fuel lines are held to the fuel filter with a clip on either end of the filter. The most common cause of a leak at the fuel filter is improper installation of these clips.

    3

    Ask your assistant to turn the ignition key to the accessories position on the ignition column. The accessories position turns on the dashboard lights cycle on but the vehicle does not start. Visually inspect the front and rear of the inline fuel filter for leaks when the key is turned to the accessories position. Ask your assistant to turn the key off and back to the accessories position three or four times while you are looking at the filter for a fuel leak.

7.3 L Turbo Diesel Engine

    4

    Open the hood of the Excursion and locate the fuel filter and the large fuel filter assembly on the side of the engine. Visually inspect the fuel filter housing for any signs of moisture or fuel leakage.

    5

    Physically check the water in-line valve at the bottom of the assembly to make sure it is tight. Use a pair of pliers and turn the valve to check that it is shut all the way. An open water in-line valve will leak a water and fuel mixture while the truck is running and the fuel system is pressurized.

    6

    Check the two mounting screws at the top of the fuel filter assembly with a Phillips screwdriver. The mounting screws hold the lid to the fuel filter in place. Make sure that the screws are tightened to at least 20 to 25 ft-lbs. of torque to properly seat the filter in its housing.