Sabtu, 30 Juni 2012

What Are the Causes of High CO Levels in a 1993 Chevrolet Lumina?

High Carbon Monoxide levels can be caused for a variety of reasons, but in general high CO levels from the exhaust can be attributed to and is a by-product of poor or incomplete combustion. This can be the result of too much fuel or not enough air going into the engine. All fuel delivery is control by the on-board computer hidden under your dashboard, but several sensors can lead the computer to delivering too much gas. Keep in mind failing an emissions test can seem really bad, but it doesnt necessarily mean there is something seriously wrong with your car; it just means its producing a higher level of emissions than the state you reside in has deemed acceptable. Either way if you want to keep driving your 93 Chevy Lumina regardless of the engine configuration you will have to lower the carbon monoxide your vehicle is producing.

Air delivery

    Even something as simple as skipping the basic maintenance and failing to replace your air filter can lead to higher than acceptable CO levels. That clogged air filter is restricting air to the engine while the ECM is still pushing the same amount of fuel into the engine; creating a rich mixture. This rich mixture causes an incomplete burn resulting in a higher carbon monoxide production during the combustion process. Change out the air filter with a new one, and make sure there are no other restrictions in the air tubing or throttle body. Small animals can crawl into your engines filter housing and build nests; causing a restriction and raising your air to fuel mixture too high. If you live in a lightly populated area or your ride sits for days at a time you can attach a small piece of wide space screen to the inlet of the intake box.

Engine Sensors

    The manifold absolute pressure sensor or MAP sensor reads the pressure or vacuum inside the intake manifold to help the ECM know how much fuel to air is actually needed. If the MAP sensor is faulty or relaying a bad reading, the computer may begin to dump extra gas that isnt needed raising your CO levels. The same concept goes for the throttle position sensor. You can find this opposite of where the throttle linkage connects to the throttle body. If the TPS is sending a high signal, the computer may mistake 50% throttle for an actual input of 35% apply a large amount of unneeded gas.

Coolant Temperature Sensor

    The coolant temperature sensor is the sensor that relays your engine temperature to your temperature gauge and to the computer. If this sensor relays a lower than accurate temperature the computer will deliver more fuel to the combustion chamber because a lower temperature requires more fuel for proper operation. Without being able to determine an accurate temperature reading the computer will naturally lean towards a richer mixture to avoid the higher temperatures related to a lean mixture. On the 3.1-liter engine the sensor is on the rear of the engine by the upper plenum, on the 3.4-liter it is on the front left side of the engine to the left of the exhaust manifold and on the 2.2-liter engine it is on the left hand side of the engine attached to the coolant outlet housing. You can remove the sensor and visually inspect it for any build up and to clean as necessary. If there is a lot of buildup on the sensor head you should also perform a coolant flush before your next emissions test.

Oxygen Sensors

    The oxygen sensors attached to your exhaust piping relay how much oxygen content is left over after the combustion process. The on-board computer will use this information to help adjust how much fuel to deliver. If the oxygen sensors are wrongly reporting a lean condition the computer will compensate with more fuel to make up the difference and raise the air to fuel ratio. A faulty sensor will likely cause the computer to illuminate the check engine light, but in some cases the computer may not catch the faulty reading. In the end your elevated level of carbon monoxide may come from any one of these sensors or a number of them combined. Your best bet is to retrieve any trouble codes stored in the computer as the first step to finding the main source of your elevated CO levels. You may be able to find a local parts store that has an emissions sniffer for rent to help you detect your emissions levels as you complete any repairs.

How to Find the Malfunction Codes for a Jeep Cherokee

How to Find the Malfunction Codes for a Jeep Cherokee

Determining what is wrong with your Jeep Cherokee when it is not running properly or when the check engine light has come on can be challenging, especially if you do not know much about vehicles. Fortunately Jeep has taken a lot of the guesswork out of troubleshooting vehicles by installing a function in the Cherokee's computer that reports problem error codes if there is something wrong. Each error code represents a specific problem. You can find the error codes, sometimes referred to as malfunction codes, by scanning the Cherokee's computer with a specially designed code reader.

Instructions

    1

    Locate a code reader to use. Most mechanic shops have several on hand or you can purchase a code reader from an auto supply store. Some auto parts supply stores even offer free diagnosis at the store using a code reader.

    2

    Hook the code reader up to the Cherokee's computer. How you do this will vary by the year model of Cherokee you have and the specific model of code reader you are using. Write down the error codes that the car's computer provides for you.

    3

    Use a code decoder to determine what each error code means. Many scanners come with decoders, or you can go to the Engine Light Help website and access a list of both generic codes and Jeep-specific codes and their meanings.

How to Troubleshoot a 1984 Honda Accord That Has No Spark When It Is Hot

If your 1984 Honda Accord has no spark when it is hot, you need to test the ignition system. Several tests are used, including a spark test to ensure the coil and distributor are working properly. The ignition system -- for purposes of this diagnosis -- consists of the coil, distributor, spark plugs, plug wires and igniter. You should always use insulated tools when working with the ignition system.

Instructions

    1

    Pull the end of the coil wire off the distributor's coil tower. Hold the wire, using the insulated pliers, about a 1/2-inch from the engine block, but not where there is chrome.

    2

    Instruct a helper to crank the engine over for one to two seconds. Watch to see if the wire sparks -- a blue-white spark should jump to the metal while the engine cranks.

    3

    Turn the ignition off. If there was spark, the coil is working properly. If there was no spark, turn the volt meter to ohms. Pull the other end of the coil wire off the coil. Stick the voltmeter red lead into one end of the wire and the black lead into the other end of the wire. If the reading is over 12,000 ohms, the coil wire is bad.

    4

    Replace the plug wires and retest.

    5

    Match-mark the distributor cap to the body of the distributor, using a marker. Remove the distributor cap, using the appropriate socket. Mark the position of the rotor, using the marker. Remove the rotor, using the appropriate socket.

    6

    Turn the crankshaft, using the appropriate socket on the crankshaft pulley bolt, until the reluctor lines up with the stator ends. Measure the gaps between the reluctor and the stator. The air gaps must be equal.

    7

    Loosen the stator-to-distributor screws if the gaps are not equal. Adjust the stator-to-reluctor air gaps, then re-tighten the screws. Retry. If the vehicle still does not have spark, continue testing.

    8

    Check the igniter by disconnecting the lead wires from the igniter unit (encased within the distributor). Set the volt meter to volts. Touch the red lead to the blue wire and the black lead to a known good ground. Note the reading. Leave the black lead on the known good ground and touch the red lead to the black/yellow wire. In both cases, you should have battery voltage. Replace the igniter if no voltage is present.

Jumat, 29 Juni 2012

How to Replace the Serpentine Belt on an S-10 Truck

The S-10 pickup truck is available with a four- or six-cylinder engine. Both engines employ serpentine drive belt systems to transfer torque from the crankshaft to the engine accessories in order to power the accessories. If the belt breaks while you're driving, at best you'll be stuck on the side of the road waiting to pay for a tow truck and a new belt. At worst, it will damage under-hood components when it breaks, costing you far more. Anyone with basic auto-repair skills should inspect the belt regularly and replace it when you note frayed edges, cracking or rib loss.

Instructions

    1

    Open the S-10's hood. Familiarize yourself with the belt routing diagram on the fan shroud.

    2

    Pull the S-10's belt tensioner off the serpentine belt. Slip the belt off the power-steering pump pulley with your free hand. Move the tensioner back into place.

    3

    Remove the serpentine belt from the remaining pulleys by hand. Pull it out of the S-10's engine bay.

    4

    Stretch out the S-10's old and new belts, side-by-side, to ensure the new belt is the proper length. The old belt should stretch approximately 1/2 inch farther than the new belt. If the new belt is more than 1/2 inch longer than the old one, you have the wrong new belt.

    5

    Loop the new belt around the underside of the crankshaft pulley by hand. Follow the S-10's belt routing diagram to run the belt around each remaining pulley until only the tensioner pulley remains.

    6

    Pull the S-10's tensioner pulley aside once more with your serpentine belt tool. Slip the belt over the tensioner pulley and relax your pressure on the tensioner slowly until it returns to its normal position. Remove the tool and close the hood.

Kamis, 28 Juni 2012

Signs of Transmission Problems in a Dodge Caravan

Signs of Transmission Problems in a Dodge Caravan

The Dodge Caravan is a minivan produced by the Chrysler Group since 1984. The Caravan has been offered with only an automatic transmission since 1995. Interestingly, the Dodge Caravan was the first minivan produced, essentially inventing the minivan category.



Automatic transmissions make driving much easier, however, when repairs are required, they are quite extensive and expensive. There are numerous signs of transmission problems, which should be addressed immediately when noticed.

Physical Signs

    Transmission fluid leakage is a tell-tale sign of transmission problems. When the automatic transmission does not have sufficient lubricating fluid, metal on metal contact occurs, damaging the transmission. Leakage could be noticed by fresh pools of fluid underneath where the vehicle is parked. More often, leaks will be noticed when checking the automatic transmission fluid level using the dipstick. This should be done at least twice a year, and more regularly if you tow anything with your Caravan.

    Checking the color of your automatic transmission fluid can show that the fluid needs to be changed. If it is a very dark color, the fluid is oxidized and must be replaced. Fluid that has noticeable debris should be replaced and you may need to replace your fluid filter as well.

    A burnt and foul odor coming from the engine compartment could also signify an automatic transmission problem.

Driving Problems

    There are many issues that you can notice while driving that could signify automatic transmission problems. Slippage while driving is common, where the engine will rev but the minivan is moving forward slowly. Erratic shifting while moving is a sign, as well as shifting at speeds that are different than the usual shifting pattern.

    If the passing gear does not engage, there may be a transmission problem. Furthermore, if you don't notice an engine-braking effect when going downhill, there may be a problem.

Shifting Problems

    If there is a delay in engagement when you try to shift from park into drive when your car is cold, there may be a transmission problem. Inability to shift into any gear from park, or movement of the vehicle in park and neutral are also signs of transmission problems.

    If your Caravan starts only when the shift indicator is slightly off park or neutral, there is likely a transmission problem. Any rough shifting, clunking into gear, or abnormal noises and vibrations when shifting are all symptoms of transmission problems.

How to Display Codes in a 2005 Dodge Magnum

The computer sends codes via the data link connector when one of the engine management sensors or valves malfunctions. Because these are electrical parts, there is no way of telling they are bad by looking at them. You need a scanner to read the codes -- scanners are readily available at most auto parts stores. The scanner produces codes in the form of a combination of letters and numbers.

Instructions

    1

    Plug the code scanner into the data link connector, which is located under the driver's side dash.

    2

    Turn the key to the "On" position. Press the "Read" button on the scanner. The scanner will display the code or codes. Write down the codes.

    3

    Compare the codes to the code sheet so that you can determine the meaning of the codes.

Rabu, 27 Juni 2012

The Check Engine Light Came on After I Filled My 2003 Subaru Legacy Up With Gas

The Check Engine Light Came on After I Filled My 2003 Subaru Legacy Up With Gas

Subaru's claim to fame was its decision to manufacture a passenger vehicle that was exclusively all-wheel drive. Coupled with its rally-race derived engine, the Legacy gained popularity for reliability, affordability and safety in its class. The 2003 Legacy combines a sleek, aerodynamic look with these features, and was manufactured as a wagon and a sedan. Among the most common complaints with this particular car is the frequently lit check engine light.

After Fueling

    Although a small percentage of the 2003 Legacy model line had significant engine problems involving the cylinder head gaskets, the appearance of the check engine light after fueling typically is the result of a loose gas cap. To determine if this is the problem, tighten the cap firmly after fueling the vehicle and see if the light goes off.

Explanation

    When the engine control module (ECM) recognizes a malfunction with one or more of the emissions control devices, the engine light switches on to warn the driver of the malfunction. Driving with the gas cap loosened increases emissions, and the ECM sends out the warning. While this does not damage the car or change its performance, it is harmful to the environment and should be remedied.

Check Engine Light Variations

    A steady yellow light, in the case of the check engine light, encourages drivers to proceed with caution. If the light begins to flash, this is an indication to stop driving the car and get it checked immediately. While a loose gas cap can initiate the problem, the check engine light may also be an indication that the catalytic converter is failing or the cylinder head gaskets are failing. The failure of these systems can cause the car to not operate properly if left unchecked.

Light Stays On

    If the light stays on even after tightening the gas cap, the monitoring system may need to be reset by a mechanic. Clearing the code programmed into the ECM must be done by a professional with specialized computer equipment. If the light returns after a few weeks or months, and you've been tightening the gas cap correctly, it may be time to consider having in-depth diagnostics performed.

Selasa, 26 Juni 2012

What Causes Engine Oil to Blow-By Into the Air Filter Box?

An oil saturated air filter or a puddle of oil in your air filter box seems like a strange occurrence by all means considering that its the last thing you would expect to find. Oil in the air filter or housing is known as blow-by and it can be caused by several different reasons that should be corrected immediately as it could be the result of or lead to serious engine damage. Determining the cause of the misplaced oil can be a bit tedious and will require at least one special tool that is likely available for rent at your local parts store.

Positive Crankcase Ventilation Valve

    The positive crankcase ventilation or PCV valve is connected to the air intake tube via a rubber vacuum hose that uses the engines natural vacuum to prevent excessive pressure build up in the engine crankcase. In most casts the PCV valve can be removed by pulling it out of the valve cover grommet and then removing the rubber vacuum hose. Generally the PCV valve should be changed at every tune-up, but is often overlooked. Remove the PCV valve, and into the side that rests inside the valve cover to see the check valve. Shake the PCV valve, if the check valve doesn't move and a rattle is not heard, the PCV could likely be the culprit, allowing oil to pass through the valve and into the intake tube. Replace the PCV valve and check the filter and housing after 500-1000 miles, continue on if the PCV valve is properly functioning or replacing it doesn't solve the problem.

Clogged Oil Passages

    Consider the vehicles routine maintenance schedule. Engine oil that becomes excessively old and worn will leave deposits in the engine oil passages over time that can build up and create bigger problems. As the oil passages become clogged it becomes difficult for oil to drain from the top of the engine down into the crankcase, cause oil to build up and pool inside the top of the cylinder head. Extremely clogged passages will cause pressure to build up and will open the opportunity for oil to push through the PCV valve and enter the air intake tube where it will drain into the air filter and filter housing. Purchase an engine flush formula from your local parts store and follow the directions. In general you will pour the formula into the oil and run the engine for a period of time. Once the engine has been flushed drain the oil and fill it with fresh engine oil. Replace the filter and see if the problem persists. In some cases you may need to flush the engine multiple times to throughly clear all the oil passages and completely solve the problem.

Worn Piston Rings

    Each piston has an oil ring that allows the piston to travel up and down without oil passing the top of the piston and entering the combustion chamber. Once the oil is in the combustion chamber it will be burned off during combustion or pushed into the intake and exhaust manifolds resulting in oil coated exhaust or oil working its way to the air filter box. The classic tale tale sign of worn or leaking piston rings is a cloud of blue smoke when the engine starts or smoking while the engine is under high load. Worn piston rings can be detected by running a compression test on each cylinder. Remove the fuel pump fuse and the wire from the ignition coil to the distributor; unplug the ignition packs or individual coils for a distributor-less ignition. Install a compression tester into each individual spark plug fitting . When the tester is installed have a helper crank the engine; an accurate reading will be attained after the engine has cranked 6 times. Write down the number and repeat for each cylinder and compare them when the process is complete. Each cylinder in general should read between 140 and 160 Psi. If any cylinder tests low squirt a small amount of oil or transmission fluid into the corresponding spark plug hole and perform the test again. If the compression raises after applying oil then the piston ring for that cylinder is bad and is likely the cause of the oil blow-by.

Repairing Internal Problems

    Replacing a piston ring is an in-depth process that will require that you remove the engine from the vehicle and tear it down completely. Replacing a piston ring will result in a full rebuild of the engine and should be left to a mechanic that has extensive internal engine experience if you are not comfortable performing such a repair. Repairing an internal engine problem such as a piston ring is time consuming and will tack on a hefty charge for labor, so if you cannot have the repair performed right away check the oil daily and replace the air filter anytime it becomes saturated to help keep the engine running as smooth as possible and prevent further damage until the repair can be performed.

Senin, 25 Juni 2012

Timing Chain Troubleshooting

Timing Chain Troubleshooting

The timing chain mechanically connects the rotation of the engine crankshaft to the rotation of the camshaft which controls the precise opening and closing of the intake and exhaust valves at the top of each cylinder as the pistons move through their compression and exhaust strokes. A worn, damaged or broken timing chain can disrupt valve synchronization, causing loss of power, hard starting or engine failure. Fortunately, properly lubricated timing chains can last the life of an engine not subjected to frequent and prolonged maximum engine acceleration. Recognizing the early signs of a possible chain failure can prevent costly valve replacement.

Instructions

    1

    Start the car with the selector in park and the hand brake engaged. Make sure the fan and air conditioner are turned off. Open the hood and listen for a rattling noise in the engine compartment. A loose or damaged chain may slap against its timing cover or engine block, and the clattering will increase with motor acceleration. Find the exact location of the sound by placing a stethoscope (or hose end) against the upper timing chain shroud and listening for an increase in the chattering noise.

    2

    Shut down the engine. Remove the distributor cap. (This troubleshooting technique is not applicable to engines with electronic ignitions.) Attach a deep socket and breaker bar to the crankshaft damper pulley nut and observe distributor rotor rotation as you slowly turn the crankshaft clockwise. If the rotor doesn't move until the crankshaft has been rotated 15 or more degrees, the timing chain has stretched, is loose because of a faulty chain tensioner pulley, or has worn gears.

    3

    Rotate the crankshaft until the timing mark on the inner edge of the crankshaft damper pulley becomes visible. Mark it with a piece of chalk. Locate the timing pointer just above and behind the crankshaft pulley. Chalk the top dead center (TDC) position. It may be only a timing mark or more likely a plate stamped with numbers radiating out on both sides of a "0" which represents TDC.

    4

    Disconnect all engine accessories interfering with access to the upper timing chain cover. Remove the cover to expose the camshaft gear and chain. With the crankshaft pulley at TDC, the timing dot on the side of the cam pulley should exactly line up with a timing mark on the cam casing. Highlight these two marks with chalk. Because the four stroke engine crankshaft has to make two complete revolutions to revolve the camshaft one time, the cam timing marks may appear 180 degrees apart. In that event, wrench the crankshaft pulley around one complete turn to TDC and check the cam timing marks. If they are not exactly lined up, that is your final proof that the timing chain has malfunctioned.

    5

    Replace the timing chain. Once you have identified the timing chain as the cause of the engine's hard starting or rough running problems, your only option is to replace it with a new original equipment manufacturer (OEM) or after market timing chain. In short, once you've located the trouble as being the timing chain, there is no repair but to replace it.

How to Troubleshoot a Dodge Dakota Truck

How to Troubleshoot a Dodge Dakota Truck

The Dodge Dakota is a mid-sized truck with the ability to handle moderately heavy workloads. The Dakota entered the market in 1987 and has been released with modifications and upgrades every year through 2009. The original models featured a square body, but Dodge rounded out the hood to match the RAM truck's profile in 1997. Troubleshooting the Dakota requires basic mechanical knowledge and the ability to monitor the engine and transmission performance for negative changes.

Instructions

    1

    Start the truck and monitor the exhaust for black smoke. Check the oil level if smoke is present. Add or change the oil if it is low or dirty. If the oil level is normal and smoke is present, the oil pump may require a new block bushing. The oil pump is a common issue in numerous Dakota models and must be repaired or replaced as soon as the problem is discovered.

    2

    Monitor the brakes closely in the 2000-2004 model Dakotas. If the brakes pulse, smoke or lock up, you must stop driving and make repairs. Have the brakes serviced as soon as you recognize the pulsing. Also contact a Dodge dealership because you may be eligible for replacement of recalled and defective parts in the brake system.

    3

    Use a voltage meter to test the battery and alternator if the engine experiences regular power loss. Connect the positive cable to the positive terminal and the negative cable to the negative terminal. If the reading is less than 12 volts, the battery must be charged before the vehicle will start. The battery and alternator may also require replacement.

    4

    Replace the starter if the power is good and the engine will not start. The starter in the 1980s and 1990s models is likely to go bad if you live in cold climates. Remove the two starter bolts with a socket wrench and have the unit tested by an automotive parts dealer. Replace the unit if it fails the test.

    5

    Plug an electronic diagnostic tester into the outlet located beneath the drivers side dash on models built after 1995. Engage the vehicle power and turn on the reader. Allow the reader to communicate with the electronics system and start the vehicle when the reader advises. After the tests are completed, read the screen to determine which sensors may require replacement. Failing sensors will dramatically affect the truck performance.

Minggu, 24 Juni 2012

Why Would a Catalytic Converter Keep Breaking?

Why Would a Catalytic Converter Keep Breaking?

Catalytic converters may function under some of the harshest conditions imaginable, but they're actually surprisingly delicate devices. Like a deep-sea fish that can never come to the surface, the converter's extreme environment is the only one that it's truly suited for. Any variation in temperature or gaseous mixture can create an internal imbalance that can destroy the catalytic converter.

Converter Construction and Function

    Converters contain two honeycomb-like ceramic blocks shot through with tiny passages called micro-ducts. A mixture of platinum, rhodium, palladium, cesium or any number of other precious metals coats the walls of the ducts. These metals interact with the heat, unburned hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxide and carbon monoxide molecules in the exhaust gases in a sort of blast-furnace reaction, producing more heat, carbon dioxide, nitrogen gas and water..

Converter Poisoning

    A "poisoned" converter is one contaminated by lead, manganese, phosphorus, silicone, zinc and the oil anti-wear additive zinc dithiophosphate or ZDDP. The lead in leaded gasoline melts at low temperatures and sticks to the inside walls of the micro-ducts. Ultimately, the lead will clog the converter ducts and render it useless. The other chemical compounds mentioned damage the converter by overheating it or interfering with the precious metals' ability to convert the gases.

Converter Meltdown

    Converters can easily withstand temperatures over 1,000 degrees, but even the best converter has a limit. Part of the converter's job is to burn off unburned gasoline in the exhaust by combining it with oxygen. This reaction produces heat, which helps to drive the converter's second-stage reaction. If too much fuel goes into the exhaust -- as during a cylinder misfire or in the event of a bad oxygen sensor -- the converter gets too much fuel and produces excess heat. This cracks the converter's ceramic matrix, causing it to collapse and create a cascade failure effect.

Solving the Problem

    Oil containing ZDDP will indeed destroy the converter, but it will take a while. Lead and phosphorus will kill it far quicker, and excess fuel in the exhaust can destroy it in a matter of minutes. This is especially true of oxygen-storing converters, which can use extra oxygen to combust more fuel.

    If you keep going through converters, then odds are that the engine runs far too rich. Look for leaking injectors, bad oxygen or mass-airflow sensors or a malfunctioning ignition system. Silicone from leaking engine coolant will also damage the converter, so you might want to pull your spark plugs and compare them to see if any seem abnormally clean. This "steam-cleaning" effect is often the result of a head gasket or intake manifold gasket failure.

1993 Mazda Mx6 ECU Problems

1993 Mazda Mx6 ECU Problems

The engine control unit (ECU) in the 1993 Mazda MX-6 controls the ignition timing, idle speed, valve timing, fuel injectors and determines the fuel mixture as well as other parameters of the engine. Several technical service bulletins (TSB) and complaints are reported on problems with the ECU that develop because of other symptoms.

No Spark

    The ECU has reports of causing the engine on the 1993 Mazda MX-6 not to crank or start because there is no spark from the ignition plugs or spark plugs. Since the ECU controls the fuel injectors and the timing of the ignition spark, the programming of the ECU is not providing the information required to begin the timing spark or telling the fuel injectors which spark plug to begin igniting when the ignition switch is engaged. According to reports, the Spark Output Connector needs to be disconnected and reconnected to restore the sparking cycle of the ECU. If this does not correct the ECU problem, the Mazda must be taken to the dealership so the ECU can be reprogrammed.

Cylinder Noise

    A TSB has been published on the 1993 Mazda MX-6 in which the ECU is creating a cylinder noise in the right rear cylinder head. The timing speed of the cylinders is not being correctly engaged by the ECU. A tapping noise is being created because the combustion spark is hesitating on this right rear cylinder head. The only correction for this ECU problem is to have the ECU reprogrammed by the dealership. The TSB states that the fuel mixture control can also be the cause, but if the fuel mixture control is the problem, more noise will be heard from all the cylinder heads.

Distributor Problems

    The 1993 Mazda MX-6 has a TSB from the manufacturer reporting defective ECUs. The distributor is the ignition component which receives the timing speed, valve timing and idle speed information from the ECU and then send that timing information to the valves or cylinders. This timing information is used to engage each cylinder in a efficient firing order. When the information from the ECU is defective, the distributor does not fire the cylinder in the correct order, which cause the Mazda to stall or misfire. The distributor components can be damaged because of this misinformation from the ECU. The ECU must be reprogrammed and the distributor must be inspected to determine if any damage was done because of the defective ECU.

Sabtu, 23 Juni 2012

How to Tell if a Car Rim Is Bent?

How to Tell if a Car Rim Is Bent?

Your car can make many sounds when you're driving down a road. Mechanics often will tell you that a constant thumping sound means a dented rim is probable. Wobbling or shaking in the tires can also be signs of bent or damaged rims. However, you cannot be completely sure about the damage to a rim until you visually examine it. A mechanic can help you determine a rim's situation and whether it can be fixed or not. There are some guidelines to help you discover if your car rim is bent before taking it to a mechanic.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the rim from the tire. If the damage isn't obvious while the rim is on the tire, take a closer look.

    2

    Examine both lips of the rim. Look for dents, warps, indentations or bends in the outside and the inside lips. The lip is where most of the damage to a rim usually occurs.

    3

    Lay the rim down on a flat surface. Examine the rim to see if it is rocking on the surface or if it is laying flat.

    4

    Take the rim to a tire shop to have it checked out. A mechanic can inspect the rim and tell you if it is bent or damaged. A mechanic will place a tire and rim on a wheel balance machine. This is a very effective way of telling if a rim is damaged.

Can I Add Anything to Help Seal an Intake Manifold Leak?

Intake manifold leaks are both insidious and irritating; insidious because they can mimic a number of other problems, and irritating because you may have to tear half the engine apart to deal with them. Rarely will the solution prove as simple as just pouring something in your oil or gas tank, but there is one case where it might.

Problem Areas

    There are two, perhaps three, places where an intake manifold can leak. All intake manifolds carry air from the carburetor or throttle body to the engine, and the gaskets that join the three components can fail and allow unmetered air to go into the cylinder head. Many manifolds used on V-configured engines also contain a coolant crossover that carries water from the cylinder heads, and this portion of the gasket is at least as likely to fail as any other. Lastly, the intake manifold often seals the top of the engine, and the end seals directly beneath the manifold can fail and allow oil to trickle out of the engine.
    .

Oil Leaks

    "Stop-leak" additives and high-mileage oils typically contain one of several combinations of hydro-treated napthenic oil -- heavy mineral oil -- and some type of ether blend. The latter causes the microscopic polymer strands in the rubber seals to relax and uncoil a bit, not unlike the way that hair relaxer does to curly hair. This causes the seals to soften and swell up a bit, sealing around whatever rubber or polymer gaskets they come in contact with. While some propose that this softening could actually reduce seal life throughout the engine, the reality is that such products really only return the seals to something like their original state. Stop Leak won't fix a gaping hole -- it only causes the rubber to swell by around 10 percent or less -- but it is worth a shot if you've got leaking end seals.

Coolant Leaks

    There are three basic types of coolant stop leak product: products that use metal particles -- essentially copper or aluminum dust -- to seal leaks, those that use expanding pellets -- like Bar's trademarked Rhizex -- and those that use sodium silicate, or liquid glass. Liquid glass is very good at sealing cracked heads and blocks but requires a lot of heat to work well. For this reason, it's not the best choice for a manifold gasket leak. The metal-suspension type works best when used on a leak in a corresponding metal; aluminum sealant for leaks in an aluminum radiator, copper sealant for leaks in a copper radiator. But metal-suspension sealants don't generally do as well at sealing gasket leaks as pelletized products do, because the pellets themselves are more like the gasket material than metal. But this should be considered as a line of last resort, since both metal-suspension and pelletized products -- in sufficient quantities -- can clog small water channels in the heads, heater core, radiator and water pump.

Finding Air Leaks

    The quickest way to track down a manifold air leak is with a can of ether starting fluid. With the engine running and at idle, hold the can about 3 inches from the suspect area and give it a one-second blast of starting fluid. If there's a leak present, engine vacuum will draw the fluid in; once in the engine, the fluid will act as a supplemental fuel, causing a momentary rise in engine rpm. Once you've confirmed a vacuum leak, you've only got two options: you can replace the gasket or you can try to seal it with silicone. There's nothing you can add to the fuel tank or anywhere else that will seal a vacuum leak, since on air goes through.

Sealing the Leak

    This solution should work as long as you can physically gain access to the leak. On a V-configured engine, start by running a thick bead of black silicone RTV sealant in an unbroken line all along the manifold-to-head mating surface. Here's the tricky part: after you lay the bead of silicone down, you'll need to wait for a minute or two for the silicone to "skin over," or dry to the touch. Then, you'll want to disconnect the ignition coil or coils, and give the starter three or four five-second bumps over the course of two minutes. You have to do it this way because, if you were to just fire up the engine before the silicone sets up a bit, engine vacuum might just suck the silicone through the leak and into your engine. And that's not good. This can be a bit more difficult on inline engines, since you'll have some trouble getting to the bottom of the manifold, but it can usually be done. Don't worry too much about leaks underneath the manifold on a V-configured engine; they might suck in a bit of oil, but net airflow through the engine remains about the same since you're only drawing gases that make it past the piston rings. Still, gasket replacement is a good idea since those dirty gases and oil are bound to cost you some horsepower and foul spark plugs.

Jumat, 22 Juni 2012

Problems Caused by Engine Oil Overfill

Problems Caused by Engine Oil Overfill

Car engines are designed to run on a specific amount of oil. Too much or too little oil can adversely affect the vehicle's performance and reliability. Most people know that running an engine low on oil is a bad idea and can cause serious damage to a car or truck. However, many owners don't realize that overfilling engine oil is just as problematic and can cause engine problems or complete engine failure over time.

Aerated Oil Problems

    When you put too much oil in an engine, there is nowhere for the excess oil to go. As the oil is turned by the crankshaft, it can become oxygenated and assume a foamy quality. Oil mixed with air does not lubricate as effectively and tends to cause overheating as well as damage to the engine's moving parts. The vehicle may experience loss of oil pressure because aerated oil is difficult for the oil pump to process.

Seals and Gaskets

    Overflowing engine oil can cause various seals and gaskets to fail as the excess oil is forced out of the engine. As seals and gaskets fail, the vehicle will develop oil leaks, which can leave unsightly stains on a driveway as well as produce low oil levels in the engine, causing further damage. Blown seals and gaskets must be detected and repaired.

Combustible Fumes

    If there is enough extra oil in the crankcase, it may be forced out through the piston seals and rings as the vehicle runs. This creates "blow-by," which has the potential to coat your engine in oil. As the oil burns off, noxious fumes and gases are released. This can create a fire hazard if enough oil accumulates on the outside of the engine.

Kamis, 21 Juni 2012

How to Troubleshoot the Battery in a Honda Civic

How to Troubleshoot the Battery in a Honda Civic

The Honda Civic has been a popular vehicle choice for Americans since it first came out in 1973. Its fuel efficiency, reliability and consistent engine performance have engendered customer loyalty. Owners have the option of a manual or automatic transmission, and most models have a 1.7 liter engine. Losing power in your Honda Civic is an indication something may be wrong with the battery. Testing your battery at home is simple and cost-effective. Voltmeters cost as little as $10 as of 2010.

Instructions

    1

    Connect a voltmeter to the battery. Attach the positive lead of the voltmeter to the positive battery terminal, and the negative to the negative. Always begin with the positive to protect yourself from electric shock.

    2

    Check the screen of the voltmeter. The reading of a healthy battery should be between 12.5 and 12.8 volts. A lesser reading is a sign your battery is too weak and may need replacing.

    3

    Check the battery cable connections for a secure grip. If the connections aren't tight, the battery has trouble providing power to the rest of the engine.

    4

    Look for signs of corrosion on the battery terminals and connections. Corrosion prohibits the flow of power from the battery to the battery cables. Also check for signs of battery acid spills.

My 2002 Chevrolet Tahoe Won't Start

My 2002 Chevrolet Tahoe Won't Start

A Chevy Tahoe may fail to start for several reasons, the most common is a dead battery. However, lack of maintence can cause mechanical problems that will also prevent it from starting. A well-maintained car that won't start probably has a fault in the electrical system. Additionally, previous attempts to start the car could have flooded the engine.

Instructions

How to Diagnose a non starting Chevy Tahoe

    1

    Turn the key to the on position. If the dashboard lights do not come on, the engine doesn't make a chugging sound that indicates it is turning over, and the headlights do not illuminate, then the electrical system is at fault. The battery is the most common reason.

    2

    Pop open the hood to look at the battery, it should be located to the upper left. You are looking for foam on the top or sides of the battery. If the battery is foaming then it is leaking acid and a mechanic has to look at it. If the there is no foam then hit the electrical posts with a shoe or a rubber mallet. Doing this may reconnect the electrical posts if they have lost their connection.

    3

    Turn the keys to the on position, look for the dashboard lights to come on or flash briefly. If the engine chugs but still does not start then the battery is dead.The battery is removed by first unclamping the connections on the battery posts with a screwdriver. The retaining clamps can be undone by hand. Take the battery out by pulling on the built-in handle. Put in the new battery and redo the clamps and electrical connections. Do not over-tighten the clamps.

    4

    Turn the keys to the on position and check again for the lights to come on and for the engine to chug. If the lights come on and the engine chugs but still does not start, then the engine is flooded. A flooded engine means fuel is coating the spark plugs and preventing them from sparking. The Clear Flood mode is a procedure built into the car to dry the spark plugs.

    5

    Depress the accerator all the way to the floor. Next, turn the ignition on several times. The motor is now pumping air instead of gas and will dry off the spark plugs by blowing air over them. Take your foot off the accelerator after a few minutes and take the key out. Put the key back in and turn the car on. If the car does not start then there are mechanical or more complex electrical problems present and a mechanic is needed.

How to Troubleshoot Engine Codes on a 2007 KIA Sorento

How to Troubleshoot Engine Codes on a 2007 KIA Sorento

When a 2007 Kia Sorento is sold in the United States, it must abide by Environmental Protection Agency rules. This means that the 2007 Kia Sorento is compliant with the second generation of On-Board Diagnostic coding. This system is universal to makes and models sold after 1996. The Sorrento's computer monitors the engine and records instances of malfunction. Once a problem repeats itself enough, the computer labels it as "trouble" and activates the check engine light. Accessing these check engine light codes is fairly easy.

Instructions

    1

    Connect your OBD-II scanner to the Kia's DLC port. It will be beneath the dashboard, in the vicinity of the steering column. Turn the scanner on. You will not need to switch it on yourself if you own a scanner that is preset to start itself once a connection is sensed. Turn the 2007 Kia Sorento's electronics on by turning the ignition to the "On" position. Turn the engine on only if you own a scanner that requires that additional step.

    2

    Look at your OBD-II scanner. If the codes were not auto-retrieved, you own a scanner that needs that command keyed in. Scanner layout and button locations differ by brand. You will need to consult your exact scanner's handbook for the precise steps on how to key in "retrieve," "read" or "scan" commands.

    3

    Look at the first letter of the alphanumeric code. Since you are looking for engine problems, focus on the codes that start with "P." These are codes that deal with both the engine and the fuel system. For the time being, you can ignore codes that begin with "C," "B" or "U." Write the P-codes on a separate sheet of paper.

    4

    Consult your scanner's handbook for the generic OBD-II coding meanings. Definitions should be in list form, and usually toward the rear of the handbook, in an appendix. The Sorento will also be using Kia's additional and supplemental OBD-II codes. These will likely be neither in the scanner's handbook nor in the Sorento's manual. You will need to find these codes online (see Resources). Copy the code meanings next to their corresponding P-codes.

    5

    Open the Kia's engine compartment and troubleshoot the locations based on your list of P-codes. For example, Kia-specific code P1496 refers to "EGR Stepper Motor Malfunction -- Circuit 1." Troubleshoot not only that particular circuit, but the Exhaust Gas Recirculation system as a whole, especially if you have a cluster of codes centering around the EGR system.

How to Troubleshoot a '97 Jeep Wrangler

How to Troubleshoot a '97 Jeep Wrangler

The Wrangler is a sport utility vehicle that was introduced in 1987 and is currently manufactured by Chrysler under the Jeep brand. Its design heritage dates back to the Jeep CJ used during World War II. The 1997 Wrangler design had the first major style changes since its debut. According to several automotive resources, such as those listed in the References section below, expected issues with the Wrangler may be found in the throttle sensor, brake rotors, door seals, suspension and exhaust manifold.

Instructions

    1

    Replace the throttle position sensor should you encounter stalling or hesitation during acceleration.

    2

    Replace the front brake rotors should you experience pulsing or throbbing sensations while braking.

    3

    Obtain new A-pillar seals should you encounter water leaks near the front of either the driver or passenger side doors.

    4

    Check the front wheels should the steering wheel wobble during driving, because they may be out of balance. If the tires are balanced, strut replacement may be necessary.

    5

    Replace the exhaust manifold should you hear ticking noises in the engine while driving.

Rabu, 20 Juni 2012

What Causes Radiator Hoses in Cars to Collapse?

What Causes Radiator Hoses in Cars to Collapse?

Car radiator hoses are the two flexible tubes that circulate coolant from the engine to the radiator, where it is cooled, then back to the engine. There are two types of radiator hoses: molded and flexible. Radiator hoses are constructed from silicone rubber, neoprene and other synthetic materials, and are designed for long service life. Nevertheless, conditions develop that may cause them to collapse or fail altogether.

Clogged Cooling System

    A collapsed radiator hose does not necessarily indicate a bad hose. Buildup of chemical deposits or debris in the cooling system will gradually constrict coolant flow. This and other coolant blockages can cause system overheating and a vacuum sufficient to collapse a weakened hose.

Faulty Radiator Cap

    Radiator caps are designed to maintain cooling system pressures in the range of 12 to 15 PSI. When an engine is shut down, the coolant temperature begins to drop. If the vacuum valve in the radiator cap fails, the resulting vacuum in the cooling system can cause a radiator hose to collapse. A malfunctioning radiator cap can also constrict coolant flow. When this happens, the water pump, trying to draw coolant through the lower radiator hose, can create a vacuum sufficient to collapse the hose.

Deterioration

    Radiator hoses are designed to withstand high pressures and temperatures ranging from -40 degrees Fahrenheit to over 250 degrees F. They must also resist chemical attack by coolants and other materials, such as oil and mud, tar and road debris, salt and ozone. Radiator hoses deteriorate with age, a process that occurs primarily from the inside out. Surface oil accelerates breakdown of the material. Surface cracks develop which cause hoses to split, blister or leak. They become hard and brittle and will eventually weaken and fail.

Faulty or Missing Wire Reinforcement

    Some radiator hoses have an inner reinforcing coil or wire reinforcement. If it is missing or damaged, the lower radiator hose could collapse at high vehicle speeds, thereby constricting or cutting off coolant flow to the engine. A collapsed hose will often resume its normal shape when the engine slows down or is turned off.

Electro-chemical Degradation (ECD)

    Modern engines and radiators can create conditions that generate electrical currents in the coolant and on the inner surfaces of coolant hoses. These currents create pits, cracks and striations in hoses, effects that eventually cause them to weaken and fail. ECD can often be identified by pinching a hose at the ends. Radiator hoses should be examined regularly. They should be replaced every five years or when there is evidence of significant wear or damage.

E30 Fuel Pressure Regulator Problems

Vehicles depend on a constant, regulated fuel supply through the engine for basic operation. However, a faulty fuel pressure regulator, such as an E30 model, can develop problems, requiring basic troubleshooting methods.

Identification

    A fuel pressure regulator alters the fuel pressure entering the fuel injectors from the fuel lines. The pressure depends on the amount of air, or vacuum, within the engine body. An E30 model pressure regulator is designated for a BMW 325 vehicle.

Troubleshooting

    A simple pressure gauge determines if an E30 fuel pressure regulator has failed. Remove the vacuum hose from the regulator while the vehicle is idling. The pressure gauge should increase by 8-12 PSI (pounds per square inch) with the hose detached. The fuel pressure regulator has failed if the PSI does not fluctuate.

Significance

    Problems with an E30 fuel pressure regulator contributes to lower fuel efficiency, as well as ignition problems. Replace a malfunctioning regulator as soon as possible to avoid fuel system failure.

How to Replace an O2 Sensor on a 2003 Toyota Tundra

The 2003 Toyota Tundra came standard with a 3.4-liter six-cylinder and a five-speed manual transmission. To meet federal emissions standards Toyota placed an oxygen sensor before and after the catalytic converter on the left and right exhaust piping. The upstream oxygen sensors are located on the lower base of the left and right exhaust manifolds, while the downstream oxygen sensors are located at the exit pipe of the catalytic converter on the left and right exhaust pipes.

Instructions

Removal

    1

    Park the truck on a level surface and set the parking brake. Lift the hood and support it with the hood prop rod. Allow the engine to cool completely before continuing.

    2

    Lift the front of the truck into the air with a floor jack and place jack stands under the front frame rails. Lower the floor jack until the truck rests securely on the jack stands. Follow the exhaust manifold toward the fire wall on either side of the engine bay to locate the upstream oxygen sensors. Follow the oxygen sensor pigtail to where it connects to the engine wiring harness. Squeeze the locking tab and separate the connectors, if replacing either upstream oxygen sensor.

    3

    Lie down under the truck and position yourself just behind the front wheels. Look at the exit points of the catalytic converter to locate the downstream oxygen sensors on the left or right exhaust pipe. Follow the pigtail to its connection at the vehicle wiring harness near the transmission. Squeeze the locking tab and separate the connectors for either sensor, if replacing the downstream oxygen sensors.

    4

    Install the oxygen sensor socket over the oxygen sensor so the pigtail extends through the opening in the side of the socket. Position the ratchet onto the socket and rotate the sensor counterclockwise to remove the sensor from the exhaust piping or exhaust manifold. Apply heat to the piping or manifold around the base of the oxygen sensor with the propane torch if the sensor is hard to loosen.

    5

    Remove the oxygen sensor socket and ratchet. Remove the oxygen sensor by hand.

Installation

    6

    Compare the old oxygen sensor to the new sensor. Pay special attention to the connector and length of the pigtail; the sensors should be identical. Inspect the threads of the new oxygen sensor and apply copper anti-seize to the threads if not pre-applied from the factory.

    7

    Thread the oxygen sensor into the exhaust piping or manifold by hand. Install the oxygen sensor socket over the oxygen sensor; directing the pigtail through the opening. Tighten the oxygen sensor to 28 foot-pounds with a torque wrench. Remove the oxygen sensor socket.

    8

    Connect the oxygen sensor pigtail to the wiring harness near the transmission, if either downstream oxygen sensor was replaced. Connect the upstream oxygen sensor pigtail to the engine wiring harness under the hood, if either upstream sensor was replaced.

    9

    Lift the front of the truck off the jack stands and remove the jack stands. Lower the truck to the ground. Shut the hood. Start the engine and clear any associated trouble codes.

Selasa, 19 Juni 2012

Symptoms of a Dying Car Battery

Symptoms of a Dying Car Battery

Car batteries are essential to the proper functioning of any vehicle. Car batteries power many of the electrical components, such as the headlights, interior lights, power windows and the starter. Problems with electrical components in a car stem typically from a dying battery. Here are some common symptoms of a dying car battery:

Trouble Starting

    One of the most common symptoms of a dying car battery is difficulty starting the car. The electrical charge contained in the battery powers the starter. If there is insufficient charge, the starter won't work. Typically, a dying battery will still be able to, but will struggle, to start the engine,

Improper Electrical Functioning

    If the battery is dying, electrical components may malfunction. This can be something as basic as the digital clock not being able to keep correct time or frequently needing to be reset. Power windows may have trouble opening or closing.

Dim Lights

    The front lights consume the most energy of all the electrical functions of a car. In situations where the battery is about to be depleted, the front headlights will be dimmer than usual or in some rare cases begin to flicker. Interior lights may also dim or flicker.

What Does the Check Engine Light Normally Mean?

An illuminated check engine light on a vehicle's instrument panel indicates a potential malfunction within the vehicle's systems. The light is triggered by an out-of-range value on one or more sensors read by an on-board diagnostic (OBD) computer.

History

    As modern vehicles became increasingly complex in the 1980s, many manufacturers added a centralized, diagnostic microprocessor. Early versions of this computer, called OBD-I, were not standardized. The Clean Air Act of 1990 mandates that vehicles sold in the U.S. after 1995 include an on-board diagnostic computer with standardized codes. This second generation is termed OBD-II.

Monitoring

    All vehicles with a second-generation, diagnostic capability continually monitor the status of the power train, particularly the fuel consumption emission controls, as mandated by the Clean Air Act. Different manufacturers also include real-time monitoring of other systems such as body and chassis integrity.

Malfunction Indication

    When any sensor reading is outside its normal range, the OBD computer illuminates the check engine light. The processor also captures a five-character code that specifies the condition. There are several hundred codes for a vehicle's power train plus manufacturer- and model-specific codes for other systems. Mechanics use a device called a code scanner to determine the problem by reading the code. Most scanners also reset the check engine light.

Meaning

    It is not possible to determine what problem has triggered a check engine light without querying the OBD computer with a scanner or other diagnostic tool. The normal meaning of the check engine light is, "Take your vehicle to a mechanic as soon as possible." Consult your vehicle's owner's manual for specific instructions.

Automotive Troubleshooting for the Check Engine Light

Automotive Troubleshooting for the Check Engine Light

The check engine light turns on when the on-board computer's diagnostic system detects an incorrect sensor reading in your vehicle. If the check engine light is on in a solid state, the sensors detect problems indicating the emissions are greater than one and a half times beyond normal, though it is safe to drive the car for a short distance. A flashing light indicates more serious car trouble and requires immediate identification. Troubleshoot the check engine light, in either the flashing or solid state, by reading the diagnostic codes available through the vehicle's on-board diagnostics port, known as the OBD-II port.

Instructions

    1

    Find the vehicle's OBD-II port. This port is on the driver's side, below the dash. Typically, the port is found below the plastic dash console to the left of the steering wheel. The OBD II port matches the shape of the OBD II reader's 16-pin cable connection.

    2

    Connect the OBD-II reader, or scan tool, to the OBD-II port. Turn the vehicle's ignition key to the "Start" position, but do not turn the vehicle on. Access the OBD-II reader's menu to retrieve the diagnostic information. Before retrieving information, many code readers require specifying in the menu the automotive brand connected to the scanner. Specific instructions vary according to device brand and model.

    3

    Allow the diagnostic reader to retrieve the diagnostic information from the vehicle's on-board computer. This may take several minutes. Codes display on the device when the process is complete.

    4

    Interpret the code. Some readers display what each code means, while others only display a diagnostic code. Retrieve code interpretation with the OBD-II reader's user's manual or through the OBD-II website.

    5

    Repair the problem the code indicates. Clear the code on the device. You may also clear the check engine light by removing the battery cable and pressing the brake and horn to remove all residual stored electricity in the on-board computer. Using this method to clear the check engine light, however, will require the car's computer to relearn operating habits. If the problem causing the trigger is not cleared, the check engine light will return.

85 Nissan 300Zx With Fan Belt Noise Problems

The Z-car began its production life in 1970 with the release of the Datsun 240Z. Through the years the name has slightly changed along with the engine size, the names it has gone by are: 240Z, 260Z, 280Z, 280ZX, 300ZX, 350Z and 370Z. 300ZX is the name given to the 1985 model year, as Nissan fitted it with a 3.0-liter V-6 engine. The 3.0-liter had two options, naturally aspirated or turbocharged. The naturally aspirated version produced 160 horsepower and the turbocharged version created 200 horsepower. The 1985 300ZX's engine has three belts; one belt drives the air-conditioner, one drives the power steering pump and the third drives the water pump, alternator and fan -- and these belts may squeal due to one of four reasons.

Belt Tension

    The belts on the 1985 300ZX stretch out over time and require periodic adjustment. Failure to adjust these belts can lead to a squealing sound. To check if the belts are loose, grab each belt at the center point between two pulleys and move it up and down. A properly tightened belt will not move more than 11/25 of an inch, if it does than it needs tightened. Tighten the water pump and fan belt belt by tightening the adjuster bolt under the alternator. Tighten the air-conditioning compressor belt by loosening the bolt in the center of the idler pulley and tightening the adjuster bolt above the idler pulley. Tighten the power steering belt by tightening the adjuster bolt behind the power steering pulley.

Glazed Belt

    The belts on the 1985 300ZX are subject to high heat and a lot of friction. This can create a glazing effect, which allows the belt to slip on the pulleys as it moves. This slipping causes a loud squealing sound. The only way to fix this problem is to replace the belt. There are several products on the market that quiet the squealing sound, but this only eliminates the noise and does not fix the aged belt.

Glazed Pulley

    A glazed pulley on a 1985 300ZX is less common than a glazed belt, but it has the same effect. The belt slips on the pulley, especially on initial start up or under heavy acceleration. The only way to rectify this failure is to remove the pulley and replace it with a new one. Replacing the belt is a great idea as well, as the slipping may have damaged the belt.

Locked Pulley

    The belts on the 1985 300ZX turn pulleys on each of the accessories, as well as running along one idler pulley. If any of the accessories or the bearing inside the idler pulley fails, it causes the pulley to stop spinning with the belt and a loud squealing sound occurs as the belt drags along the pulley. This can also create smoke and cause the belt to break. The only way this problem is fixed is by replacing the failed component and replacing the belt.

Narrowing it Down

    Due to the number of belts, actually figuring out which belt is making the noise may seem difficult. If the squeal becomes louder with the air-conditioning on, it is likely the air-conditioning belt is the culprit. The power steering belt is the likely culprit if the squeal becomes louder when the turning the steering wheel all the way to one side. If neither accessory increases the noise, it is likely that the water pump and fan belt is the one squealing.

How to Reset the Error Message on a Mercedes Benz

Error codes on your Mercedes allows you to find specific issues on the vehicle that should be fixed. Sometimes after the device has been fixed you may have error codes won't erase. Removing the battery terminal to reset the error message will not fix the problem and may cause strain on your fuses. Purchasing a code scanner from your local auto supplies store or website will help manually remove the error code. If you erase the error code before the problem is fixed, the error code may return at a later time.

Instructions

    1

    Purchase a 16pin OBD11 scanner, which will connect to your Mercedes and list current error codes. If your Mercedes was manufactured before 1994, you may have a 38 pin socket, which requires you to purchase a 38 pin scanner instead. Code scanners can be found on sites like eBay, Amazon and OBD2-scanner.com

    2

    Connect the OBD11 scanner into the port which should be located near the steering wheel by the dash. Each model Mercedes-Benz may have the connector port in different locations so refer to your owner's manual.

    3

    Start the vehicle and wait for any applicable error codes to appear on the scanner. Press either the erase or delete button depending on which scanner reader you purchased. Remove the scanner from the port and turn off the vehicle. Wait approximately 20 minutes and turn the vehicle on to see if the error code was erased.

Senin, 18 Juni 2012

Can a Bad Head Gasket Cause Low Oil Pressure?

Troubleshooting automotive problems can be difficult since so many different makes and models of cars have their own quirks. There are a number of problems that can cause a low oil pressure reading. Likewise, there are a few different symptoms of a blown head gasket.

Detecting a Bad Head Gasket

    While some warning signs of a bad head gasket can only be detected with special tools, there are two telltale signs that a head gasket has gone bad. The first is a cloud of white smoke exiting the exhaust. The second is a whitish sludge in the oil caused by water and antifreeze mixing with the oil. Since a bad head gasket can cause a vehicle to overheat, you should check for these warning signs if you have experienced problems with your car overheating.

Causes of Low Oil Pressure

    Low oil pressure can be caused by a number of problems, including inaccurate gauge or sending unit; thin oil due to poor oil quality; excessive oil pressure; broken oil pressure relief spring; oil inlet tube restriction or leak; or excessive oil pump or camshaft clearance.

Head Gaskets and Low Oil Pressure

    While the main effect of a bad head gasket on your engine oil will be water or antifreeze getting into your oil, a secondary result could be low oil pressure due to continued engine overheating.

How to Troubleshoot a Turbocharger

Turbochargers substantially increase an engine's horsepower potential by pressurizing the intake track, effectively forcing air into the cylinders. However, turbo systems are also inherently complex, and therefore more difficult to troubleshoot than naturally aspirated setups. The turbo intercooler and vacuum systems are known to develop boost leaks over time. Boost pressure leaks are the most common malfunction for these devices, leading to various other performance and emissions issues. Since locating small boost leaks visually is nearly impossible, a pressure tester should be used.

Instructions

    1

    Make sure the vehicle has properly cooled down before working with turbo system components, because they can get very hot under normal driving. Remove the air intake tube from the turbocharger inlet by loosening the intake hose ring. Some vehicles may require removal of other components for access to the turbo inlet, such as engine covers and heat shields.

    2

    Grip the turbocharger compressor wheel and try to move it from side to side. The compressor wheel is accessible through the turbo inlet. Turbochargers in perfect condition have no play in the compressor wheel. Most turbochargers can operate normally with very minor compressor wheel play. However, this indicates worn bearings, so consider having your turbocharger rebuilt if the compressor wheel has any play at all. Excessive compressor wheel play likely means a failing turbocharger.

    3

    Examine the various turbo system vacuum lines for damage. Because the vacuum lines are made of rubber, they are prone to breaking down under the extreme heat generated by the turbo system, especially on high-mileage vehicles. And vacuum lines are prone to coming loose from their connections under the stress of increased-boost applications. Make sure that all vacuum lines are in perfect airtight condition, and are securely connected to their proper fittings.

    4

    Hook a pressure tester onto the turbocharger inlet. Use the hand pump to pressurize your turbo and intercooler system. If the pressure holds, the turbo system is free of boost leaks. If the pressure tester meter shows pressure loss, this indicates a boost leak. To locate leaks with the pressure tester, keep the turbo system pressurized while listening along all intercooler piping and vacuum lining. The boost leak is readily revealed by a hissing air noise.

Minggu, 17 Juni 2012

How to Display Diagnostic Codes on a GM Navigation System

How to Display Diagnostic Codes on a GM Navigation System

Not all General Motors vehicles can display On-Board Diagnostic codes on their instrument clusters. General Motors cars and light trucks assembled after 1996 are required to abide by Environmental Protection Agency standards, meaning that the diagnostic codes are alpha-numeric and can only be accessed with diagnostic hardware like a scanner or a laptop installed with OBD-II reading software. General Motors vehicles 1995 and earlier, however, abide by a different system, commonly referred to as OBD-I. These vehicles can be placed into a self-testing mode, and the diagnostic codes are conveyed by a flashing check engine light.

Instructions

    1

    Sit behind the GM vehicle's steering wheel and stick your key into the ignition and locate the vehicle's Assembly Line Data link port. For all General Motors vehicles, this outlet is situated directly below the steering wheel.

    2

    Straighten out a paper clip. It needs to be a metal one, preferably one without a coated plastic or rubber exterior. Shape the paper clip into a letter "U."

    3

    Locate the two slots on the GM vehicle's ALDL. You need the last two slots on the upper row. If they are labeled, they are slots "A" and "B." Connect the two with the U-shaped paper clip.

    4

    Turn the key in the ignition. You need the electrical system powered, but the engine needs to remain off.

    5

    Count and record, on a piece of paper, how many times the check engine light flashes at you. You will need to discern between two types of light flashes. GM's OBD-I codes are numbers comprised of two characters. The first number will be seen as long flashes. The second number will be seen as shorter blip-like flashes. There will be a pause of a second or two between whole codes. For example, GM OBD-I codes 24 and 36 will be be represented by two long flashes and four shorter flashes. There will then be a pause, followed by three long flashes, and six shorter flashes.

    6

    Turn the GM vehicle's electrical system off, once you have written down all the codes. Your GM vehicle's owner manual will not help you decipher the numbers. If you possess a Chilton or Haynes repair handbook for your vehicle, you will find coding definitions there. Otherwise, you will need to locate the code definitions online.

Sabtu, 16 Juni 2012

BMW Code PO727 Engine Speed Input Circuit No Signal

BMW Code PO727 Engine Speed Input Circuit No Signal

On-board diagnostic (OBD) systems are installed in most modern cars. They are made up of sensors and a computer. The sensors relay information about how a car is running, and the computer analyzes the data received and outputs it in the form of a OBD code. The code, PO727, relates to a lack of data being received by the OBD computer.

Code P0727

    The P0727 code is a universal code, so it is used by most manufacturers, including BMW. Its technical description is "Engine Speed Input Circuit No Signal," caused by a lack of data for the engine speed input circuit.

Engine Speed Input Circuit

    The Crankshaft Position (CKP) sensor monitors engine speed, sending its data to the Engine Control Module (ECM). The ECM sends this data on to the Transmission Control Module (TCM). Code P0727 is the result of the TCM not receiving the signal from the ECM.

Causes

    The cause could be a fault with the CKP sensor and its circuit to the ECM or problems between the ECM and TCM. In the first instance it is worth checking the electrical connections on the sensors, ECM and TCM for damage, moisture or dirt.

Jumat, 15 Juni 2012

Defective Oxygen Sensor Diagnosis

Defective Oxygen Sensor Diagnosis

Diagnosing a defective oxygen sensor can be difficult as it is unlikely to cause major engine problems. However, a properly working oxygen sensor is important to maximize fuel efficiency and engine performance, as well as to reduce emissions.

Purpose

    An oxygen sensor is used to measure the amount of oxygen in an automobile's exhaust. The vehicle's computer uses this information to determine the amount of air in the mixture of air and fuel being used for combustion. The computer then adjusts the mixture for optimal engine performance.

Symptoms

    The primary symptom of a defective oxygen sensor is a reduction in fuel efficiency. As the oxygen sensor begins to fail, the system will be slow to adjust the air fuel mixture, resulting in lowered engine performance. A defective oxygen sensor may also cause the "check engine" light to turn on.

Inspection

    Testing the oxygen sensor requires specialized tools and knowledge, but sensors generally fail due to sediment build up on the sensor tip or corrosion. Removing the oxygen sensor for a visual inspection can reveal these problems. As oxygen sensor performance declines over years of use, replacing a sensor that has not completely failed will still result in improved engine performance.

Honda Accord Radiator Troubleshooting

Honda Accord Radiator Troubleshooting

The Honda Accord comes to America from Japan and first appeared during America's Bicentennial Celebration in 1976. Honda made the Accord slightly larger than the Civic, allowing for more breathing space and cargo while still saving the consumer on gas. The Honda Accord cooling system consists of a pressurized engine cooling system with thermostatically controlled coolant circulation. It employs an impeller type water pump which pumps fluids throughout the engine, controlled by a thermostat and cooled by the radiator. The Honda Accord has two cooling fans, a condenser fan and a radiator fan.

Instructions

    1

    Inspect the coolant level at first sign of overheated radiator. Add more coolant if needed. Use a dry towel over the cap to prevent burns after the engine has cooled, to open the radiator cap. If the car has a radiator overflow then open this cap instead to replace lost fluids.

    2

    Place your hand on the cap and wiggle it for tightness. Screw the cap tighter or replace the cap. A loose cap can cause leakage and overheating.

    3

    Use the back of your hand to check heat emanating from the lower radiator hose if the radiator is overheating. If no heat exists but the engine is hot this indicates the thermostat is stuck closed. Replace the thermostat.

    4

    Examine the car engine to see if the engine warms up in a reasonable time. If not, the thermostat is stuck open and needs replacement.

    5

    Look at the coolant fan of the radiator to see if it has motion. If the fan does not operate this could indicate a faulty fan motor. Attach fan directly to the battery to test fan motor. If motor does not kick in, install a new fan motor.

    6

    Inspect the radiator grille with a flashlight if there is overheating. Any dirt on the grille will affect performance of the radiator. Clean the grille.

    7

    Feel the radiator for circulation. Bend the hose with your hands slightly while the engine is operating and then let the hose go. You should feel a surge of coolant. Bad circulation indicates a blocked core. If the radiator core is blocked flush out the radiator and fill with coolant. Remove the radiator and reverse flush for severe blockage. Poor circulation could also indicate a bad water pump.

    8

    Inspect the radiator for leaks with a good flashlight. If any fluids flow from the radiator the leaks can be stopped temporarily with products from your local automotive store but the radiator should be replaced right away.

Kamis, 14 Juni 2012

How to Troubleshoot the Brakes on a 1991 Chevy G30 Van

How to Troubleshoot the Brakes on a 1991 Chevy G30 Van

The 1991 Chevrolet G30 van is a full-sized van that is often used for hauling heavy loads of cargo or passengers. Due to this hauling and the size of the van, the brake system may develop some minor, or even major problem. It is always best to troubleshoot and brake problems on your G30 as early as possible to prevent farther damage. There are two main problems that are fairly easy to troubleshoot in the braking system on your 1991 G30.

Instructions

Grinding, Scraping or Squealing from the Front

    1

    Loosen the G30's front lug nuts, using a ratchet and socket, but don't remove them at this time. Jack up the front of the van and secure it by placing jack stands beneath the frame rails. Lower the G30 until it is resting only on the jack stands. Remove the front lug nuts and pull the van's front wheels off.

    2

    Look at the brake caliper and locate the pad observation hole on the front of the caliper. Select the proper thickness from the brake pad thickness gauge -- 1/32-inch for original equipment pads and 1/2-inch for after market pads. Place the thickness gauge through the observation hole and against the brake pad.

    3

    Check the thickness of the pad, relative to the selected thickness gauge.

    4

    Replace the brake pads if they fall below the necessary thickness.

    5

    Clean the brake rotor -- the large metal disk -- and the pads with brake parts cleaner, as the noise may be caused by dirt or debris.

    6

    Place the wheels back on the G30 and hand-tighten the lug nuts.

    7

    Raise the G30 off of the jack stands, using the floor jack, and remove the jack stands. Carefully lower the van to the ground and tighten the lug nuts -- in a criss-cross pattern -- to 140 foot-pounds, using a torque wrench and a socket.

Soft or Spongy Brake Pedal

    8

    Open the G30's hood and locate the master cylinder reservoir, the plastic container on the front, driver's side of the engine compartment. Check the level of the fluid in the reservoir, it must be between the "Min" and "Max" lines.

    9

    Add DOT 3 brake fluid if the level falls below the "Min" line and recheck the pedal. Continue troubleshooting if the problem still exists.

    10

    Raise the front of the G30, using the floor jack, and secure it with jack stands. Lower the van until it rests only on the jack stands.

    11

    Crawl beneath the the G30 and locate the brake bleeder valve, it is located on the rear of the brake caliper, directly behind the front wheel. There is no need to remove the wheels to access this valve.

    12

    Place the drain pan directly below the bleeder valve and instruct your assistant to press and release the brake pedal until it feels firm.

    13

    Instruct you assistant to hold the brake pedal as far down as possible and loosen the bleeder valve, using the combination wrench.

    14

    Observe how the fluid comes from the valve. If this fluid spits and sputters this means there is air in the lines and must be bled to fix your soft brake pedal. Make certain to tighten the bleeder, using the combination wrench, after the fluid has come out and before your assistant releases the brake pedal.

    15

    Repeat Steps 4 through 7 for the brakes behind all four wheels. If no air is present in the lines, the problem likely lies in the master cylinder.

How to Spot a Condenser Problem on 12-volt Ignition

How to Spot a Condenser Problem on 12-volt Ignition

Condensers are used on breaker point ignition systems to protect the point contacts from arcing as they open. The condenser absorbs electrical energy and stores it until after the points open. The energy is then released, and secondary ignition voltage is amplified. Complete failure of a condenser halts all ignition function, but a weak one creates less obvious problems. While oscilloscopes and capacity testers quickly reveal a weak condenser, some quick inspections with basic tools can accomplish this diagnosis just as certainly.

Instructions

    1

    Disconnect a spark plug wire from any plug that is easily accessed. Connect the wire to the spark tester and ground the tester to the engine block. Start the engine and observe the spark produced at the tester. Replace the condenser if the spark is weak or erratic.

    2

    Shut off the engine, remove the spark tester from the wire and restore the plug wire to the plug. Leave the secondary ignition cables attached to the distributor cap and release the cap hold-down clips or screws. Move the cap to the side of the distributor that allows the best view of the points.

    3

    Spread the points open and inspect the contact surfaces. Replace the condenser and points if the surfaces are pitted or covered by a dark burned substance that indicates heat transference. Inspect the body of the condenser for oil seeping from the wire end. Replace a leaking condenser after cleaning the breaker plate of spilled oil.

Rabu, 13 Juni 2012

How to Check the Chevy Aveo's Engine Gas Cap

If the "Check Engine" light on your Chevy Aveo's instrument panel is glowing and there's nothing wrong mechanically with the engine itself, your gas cap might be loose. For most vehicles, including the Aveo, an improperly closed gas tank cap will trigger the "Check Engine" light. Checking the gas cap is simply a matter of making sure it fits tightly on the fuel filling receptacle. If the gas cap appears damaged, replace it with an OEM (original equipment manufacturer) part.

Instructions

    1

    Locate the Aveo's fuel filler door release lever on the floor on the left side of the driver's seat. Exit the vehicle and approach the gas cap on the passenger side of the vehicle.

    2

    Remove the gas cap by slowly turning it counterclockwise. Check the cap itself to ensure that it is not physically damaged. Replace the cap by seating it on the fuel filler receptacle and turning the cap clockwise until the cap audibly clicks. If the cap is properly installed, the "Check Engine" light will disappear after a few driving trips.

    3

    Replace the gas cap with a new OEM part if the "Check Engine" light remains after several trips. Aftermarket gas caps may not fit properly or may cause gasoline to vent from the cap, triggering the "Check Engine" light once again.

How to Test Subaru Power Door Locks

The power door locks on a Subaru contain two components, the power lock actuator and the power lock switch. The switch closes the power lock circuit when you push it, sending electricity to the actuator. When the actuator receives the electricity; it either opens or closes, depending on the direction you pushed the lock switch. If the switch or the actuator stops working, your Subaru's power door locks won't operate properly, or at all. Anyone with a mind for mechanical repair can test the Subaru power door locks in less than 25 minutes.

Instructions

    1

    Pry the Subaru's door lock switch out of the door using a trim tool. Unhook the switch from the power door lock wiring harness connector by hand.

    2

    Plug the new power door lock switch into the power door lock wiring harness connector by hand.

    3

    Test the power door locks by pushing the new power door lock switch to lock or unlock the door. If the power door lock actuator responds to the new switch, your old switch was bad. If the power door lock actuator does not respond to the switch, then you have a faulty power door lock actuator.

    4

    Reinstall either the original power door lock switch or the new power door lock switch in reverse of how you removed it.

Senin, 11 Juni 2012

My Car Won't Jump But All the Lights Work

My Car Won't Jump But All the Lights Work

If the lights in your car are working, but the car still won't turn over or start, there could be a variety of reasons why. Since lights in the car are powered by the battery, we can eliminate the battery as the source of the problem. It is likely to be a problem with spark or fuel. Spark encompasses ignition-related parts, and fuel refers to gas and parts that pressurize and distribute gas.

Instructions

    1

    Check to see if the car has oil in it. Open the hood and check your oil dipstick. Lack of oil could cause the vehicle to seize.

    2

    Look on the dashboard for a security or key-shaped light. This light represents the immobilizer, which allows the car to run only if the correct key is inserted. If this light is present, there could be a problem with the immobilizer or the key. Use a spare key or get another key from the dealer.

    3

    Put the gear shifter in neutral and try to start the car. If the vehicle turns over, the safety neutral shift could be bad. The neutral safety shift allows the vehicle to start when in neutral or park. If the vehicle turns over in neutral but not in park, the switch could be bad.

    4

    Turn the car key in the ignition to see if it cranks. If it does not crank, go to step six. If it cranks but does not start, then the problem is either spark or fuel. This means it is not getting gas, which could be the result of a faulty fuel pump or clogged fuel filter, or spark, which could result from problems in the ignition system, such as bad spark plugs, bad wires or a bad distributor cap, rotor or ignition module. If it is an electronic ignition and there is no distributor cap, the coil pack could be bad.

    5

    Turn the car key again and listen for the fuel pump to come on. You should hear the fuel pump build up pressure. If not, you might need a new fuel pump.

    6

    Put the car firmly in park. Turn the key in the ignition and if there is no crank, the electronic key pad in the ignition could be bad.

    7

    Turn the key and listen for a loud click. If you hear a click, the starter solenoid, starter cable or starter could be bad.

Minggu, 10 Juni 2012

Why Does a Plug Wire Jump Fire to an Engine Block?

Spark plug wires, also known as ignition wires, are usually sturdy and last a long time, provided that they are kept in their wire looms, to avoid rubbing against the hot engine. Since an engine always has some movement during operation, the trick is to keep the wires far enough away from any other part that they could rub against while the engine moves. At the factory, ignition wires are routed through several looms that are mounted on brackets.

What An Ignition Wire Is

    An ignition wire carries electricity from a distributor or ignition coil to a spark plug. A typical ignition wire is made up of five layers; the inner core, suppression layer, inner insulator, braiding and outer insulator. The core and insulator are made of various materials depending on the application.

Why wires arc

    Electricity follows the path of least resistance. If the outer insulator is worn through or cracked and it is close to a good conductor, like an engine, you will see the spark jumping, or arcing, from the wire to the engine block. If you see this it's time to change the wires.

Problems cause by arcing wires

    An arcing wire can cause a weak spark or no spark, which will foul the spark plug in that cylinder with partially burned or unburned fuel. Unburned fuel could also damage the catalytic converter. A misfiring cylinder, which will make you engine run rough, is another result of of an arcing wire. It can be dangerous to have arcing wires if you have a fuel leak, as this could cause a fire. To avoid unexpected problems, it's a good idea to check your wires every time you change your spark plugs.

Checking ignition wires

    Obvious signs of damage to the wires are burn marks, cracks, splits, and grooves. The damage is not always apparent, so you will have to look closely. Turn the engine off and let it cool. With the wires in place, start at one end of each wire and check it thoroughly following it to the other end. Also, make sure the wires are clipped securely in the looms. Ignition wire looms are the clips mounted along the sides or top of the engine that keep the wires away from anything that could damage them.

Sabtu, 09 Juni 2012

O2 Sensor Test Procedures in a 2002 F-150

The 2002 Ford F-150 uses four oxygen (O2) sensors. They are numbered by the side of engine they are located on and referred to as bank. The passenger side is bank 1 and the drivers side is bank 2. Each bank has a sensor between the exhaust manifold converter and one after the converter. The oxygen sensor measures the free oxygen present after combustion has occurred within the cylinders. The computer uses this information to determine the proper fuel mixture.

Instructions

    1

    Plug the code scanner into the on-board diagnostics (OBD) port located under the dash to the left of the steering column. Turn the ignition switch to the on position without starting the engine.

    2

    Depress the Read key on the scanner. Make a note of the codes displayed. Cross-reference the code with the code sheet for an explanation of the code. The code identifies which of the four oxygen sensors has an irregular signal.

    3

    Check the sensors individually with a voltmeter. The code scanner usually gives enough information to deduce which sensor has failed, however, sensors can be checked manually with a helper. Each sensor has a round electrical plug. When holding the plug so it is being viewed from the harness to sensor side, notice there are four wires. Locate the top of the plug, which in this case is the locking clip. This is the top. Reading left to right, the top two are numbered 1-2 respectfully, and the same for the bottom 3-4.

    4

    Connect the black voltmeter lead to a good ground and use the red lead with the wire probe to pierce the number 4 wire the lower left wire.

    5

    Start the truck and allow it to warm up sufficiently to cause the sensor to go into closed loop. Have the helper hold 2,500 rpm while you observe the voltmeter. The voltage should be continuously rising and falling with the minimum voltage being 250mv and the maximum of 800mv. It should be fluctuating between three to five times per second. If there is little or no change in the voltage, the sensor is bad.

Trouble Code 1131 for a Ford

Trouble Code 1131 for a Ford

Determining fault codes for your Ford is the first step toward diagnosing and repairing your vehicle. Once hooked to an automobile scanner, areas of your Ford that are not operating correctly or within normal limits will be revealed via a specific number code. Each code corresponds to a specific part or operating system within your Ford's engine. Trouble code 1131 on your Ford deals with the exhaust system.

Instructions

    1

    Remove the rear oxygen sensor located near the catalytic converter using the oxygen-sensor wrench. You can buy one or rent one at most auto parts stores. There are two oxygen sensors. Code 1131 is for the one sensor closest to the catalytic converter.

    2

    Replace the rear oxygen sensor in your Ford with a new one.

    3

    Drive your car for about 15 minutes. The check engine light should go off, indicating that you have repaired the problem causing your Ford's 1131 fault code.

How to Use the Actron Cp9135 Auto Code Reader

How to Use the Actron Cp9135 Auto Code Reader

Although the Actron CP9135 is no longer in production, it is still a widely available code reader in the automotive repair and parts industry. The CP9135 is OBD II compliant. This was the second phase of automobile on-board diagnostics that standardized plug connections and tools to read trouble codes on all vehicles manufactured from 1996 and beyond. While some manufacturers began complying to OBD II as early as 1994 (for 1995 models), many were still installing first-phase on-board diagnostics (until the mandated date) making the plug connections and code readers/scan tools needed vehicle specific.

Instructions

    1

    Locate the data/diagnostic link connector (DLC) on the vehicle. Refer to the vehicle's owner's manual for the location of the DLC, if necessary. The most common location for the DLC is under the driver's side dashboard near the steering column. Inspect the plug of the CP9135 in order to look for a plug with the same trapezoidal shape. Some DLCs (not all) may feature a cover on them that requires removal of the cover in order to plug the code reader into them. Other places for DLCs (much less common) may be on the passenger side lower dash, behind the ashtray (some earlier Honda models) or in the center console (very rare).

    2

    Plug the CP9135 code reader into the DLC. The auxiliary battery power of the vehicle will automatically provide power to the code reader, which eliminates having to turn on a power button on the unit.

    3

    Turn the ignition key to the "On" position without starting the engine. This will set up reading any diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) that have triggered the malfunction indicator lamp (also known as the check engine light).

    4

    Follow the on-screen LCD menu display on the face of the CP9135. Use the buttons on the face of the code reader below the screen to perform the task intended. The main menu will display options "1" through "5:" 1, Read codes; 2, Erase codes (the unit also features an Erase button which can eliminate this option if desired); 3, MIL status; 4, I/M (inspection and maintenance monitors); and 5. Tool setup/test. The tool setup/test option will feature an additional "1" through "5" options.

    5

    Press the "Enter" button (lower right-hand button on the unit face) with the menu on option 1 (read codes) to determine any DTCs that may have triggered the MIL. A brief description of the DTC(s) will appear once the CP9135 has communicated with the vehicle's computer. Also, press the "Enter" button when on any other option ("1" through "5") to activate the desired option.

    6

    Scroll down ("No" button) to the other four options below the "Read codes" if desired. Option "2" will erase the DTC(s) or the "Erase" button (top right on the unit face) if desired. Be aware that if the DTCs displayed are not corrected or "hard codes" (immediate trouble codes), the MIL will not remain out once the computer of the vehicle has reset and the sensors and circuits have recommunicated to the computer. The circuits and sensors involved with the recommunication to the computer are also known as the I/M monitors. These may take as long as several driving cycles to recommunicate, and once they have, they will either become "ready" or will re-trigger the MIL on the instrument panel.

    7

    Use the "Yes" and "No" buttons (on the center of the unit face) to scroll up or down between desired options. Also, use them to answer "yes" or "no" to questions the on-screen display may ask. When erasing a DTC, for example, the CP9135 will offer the option "are you sure you want to erase the DTCs?" Enter "yes" or "no" as desired.

    8

    Press the "Back" button whenever going back to a previous option is desired.

    9

    Scroll to option "3" (MIL status), and hit the "Enter" button to find out the current MIL status of the vehicle. If the I/M monitors have not reset, the MIL status will inform the user the status is not ready.

    10

    Scroll to option "4" (I/M monitors) and press the "Enter" button to discover which I/M monitors are still not in "ready" mode yet. This option works best with the vehicle running and performing drive cycles in order to view the progress of the I/M monitors (may take several drive cycles, as explained in Step 6).

    11

    Scroll to option "5" (Tool setup/test), and press the "Enter" button to scroll through the additional options. These options are specifically for the functionality and troubleshooting of the CP9135 unit: 1, "Adjust contrast" changes the contrast of the on-screen menu using the "Yes" and "No" buttons to scroll; 2, "Display test" displays LCD display of the on-screen menu; 3, "Keyboard test" performs a test on the keyboard buttons on the unit to ensure they're functioning correctly; 4, "Memory test" check the memory of the unit to ensure it is functioning properly; 5, "SW ID" (software identification) is used when contacting customer support for the functionality of the unit is required.