Rabu, 30 Juni 2010

Ford Taurus Code P0174

Whether you're talking about the Ford Taurus or any other car produced since 1996, code P0174 always indicates the same sort of problem. This code is a generic "emissions" listing, used to help federal emissions officers determine whether or not your car is spewing cyanide into the groundwater. While this very common code always means "lean condition, bank two," the causes for a fuel-poor condition can be extremely varied.

Instructions

    1

    Take your car to a certified Ford mechanic and have all the active and stored codes checked. A generic Onboard Diagnostics, Series II scanner only picks up certain codes relevant to the car's emissions output; it's not really designed to provide precise diagnosis. More sophisticated scanners can read manufacturer-specific and stored codes that a generic scanner may not, and that kind of information can save you a great deal of time and money in tracking down problems. But, you'll need to clear the codes after checking them, regardless of how you do it.

    2

    Locate the primary oxygen sensor and unplug it. If you're facing the "front" of the engine, the side with the belt and alternator on it, bank two is on the right -- driver -- side -- of the engine. Check that the sensor connector harness is tight; a "lean" signal from the O2 sensor is essentially a low-voltage condition and a bad or loose connection, or corrosion on the terminals, can impede flow just enough to throw a false lean signal.

    3

    Turn the chassis-side connector so that it faces you with the large tab at the twelve o'clock position. Note the pin connections; the one on the upper-left is the heater line (HTR), top-right is the power line (VPWR), bottom-left is the signal line (SIG) and bottom-right is the signal-return (RTN) line. With the key on, test the voltage from SIG to VPWR with a digital multimeter; it should read 1.5 volts. With the key off, resistance between the SIG and VPWR lines should be 10,000 ohms. Now, turn to the corresponding pin terminals on the O2 sensor harness itself and test the resistance in ohms; if it's less than 5.0 ohms, you've got a bad O2 sensor -- not a problem with the engine.

    4

    Check your engine's intake tubing and vacuum lines for un-metered air leaks; that means air leaking into the system anywhere past the airbox. Start the engine, then spray a two-second burst of ether starting fluid or brake cleaner around each of the joints in the intake tubing and around all of the vacuum line connections. If you've got an air leak, the engine will draw the fluid in, use it as a fuel and briefly rise in rpm as it burns the starting fluid or brake cleaner.

    5

    Check your fuel pressure fast- and slow-leakdown, using a fuel pressure gauge connected to the Schrader valve on your engine's fuel rail. Cycle the car's key on and off several times to build up fuel pressure. When you turn the key off the last time, the fuel pressure should remain within 5 psi of its highest reading more than a minute after you shut the car down. If pressure drops quickly in less than a minute, you may have either an external or internal leak causing low fuel pressure and a subsequent lean condition.

Selasa, 29 Juni 2010

How to Test the Fuel Sending Units in a 1990 Jeep Wrangler

The fuel-sending unit on a 1990 Jeep Wrangler is nothing more than a potentiometer. A potentiometer regulates the amount of voltage to an object through varying resistance. It works much like the dimmer switch for house lighting. The fuel gauge has three terminals. One terminal receives battery power. The second terminal is a ground for its illumination. The last terminal is the lead from the sending unit in the fuel tank. When working properly, the signal from the sending unit registers the dial on the fuel gauge appropriate to the level of fuel in the fuel tank. The gauge and the sending unit must have the same ohms to be compatible.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the rear of the Jeep by placing the floor jack under the rear axle housing. Place the jack stands under the axle tubes and lower the vehicle so it rests on the stands. Turn the ignition switch to the On position without starting the vehicle.

    2

    Disconnect the fuel pump and sending unit harness just behind the fuel tank. Locate the power terminal in the engine side of the harness connector. Place the voltmeter black ground wire on a good ground. Probe the terminals for a terminal that has constant power using the red lead.

    3

    Install the alligator clip on the jumper wire to this terminal. Have a helper just watch the gauge while you momentarily touch the other alligator clip to ground. If the gauge moves toward the full mark the gauge is all right. If the gauge does not move the gauge is bad.

    4

    Turn the ignition key off. Turn the dial on the volt or ohmmeter to ohms. Leave the black lead on a good ground and check the remainder of the terminals in the harness connector with the red probe, to check for a good ground. When a good ground is located, the display will go from a zero to a point followed by the amount of ohms, if any. If no ground is indicated, follow the black wire in the vehicle harness to the ground on the frame.

    5

    Loosen the bolt with a wrench and clean any rust off the frame. Reinstall the ground. Retest to ensure the ground is good and has no resistance.

    6

    Replace the fuel sending unit if the gauge still fails to register even though it was found to be good and the sending unit has a good ground.

How to Troubleshoot the Blower on a 1996 BMW 325is

The blower (or blower motor) is the fan that circulates air in the BMW 325is when you turn on the heater or air conditioner. If this blower motor is damaged or inoperative then the cool or hot air cannot circulate in the interior cabin. The blower motor can burn out or the fan blades may snap off, though '90s European cars are more likely to suffer from an electrical burnout due to their corrosion-prone wiring.

Instructions

    1

    Drive the 325is to your garage or a parking lot. Turn the fan on and feel for any air coming out the vents. If there is no air, then the blower motor needs to be replaced. Put the 325is into "Park," then engage the parking brake so there is no danger of gear slippage during the repair. Make sure you have room to maneuver around the front of the BMW for the removal process. Turn the BMW off and open the hood and trunk.

    2

    Go into the trunk of the BMW and disconnect the negative battery cable from the car's battery. The battery is located in the trunk of the 325is for better weight allocation. Go around to the front of the 325is and prop the hood up with the hood prop stick. The blower motor assembly will be mounted with six screws against the rear firewall. Remove the screws with a Phillips-head screwdriver and pull the blow motor assembly off the firewall.

    3

    Press the pressure clips on either side of the motor and pull the motor from the blower assembly. If the blower motor has burnt out, then there will be a smell of ozone in the air. If the fan has broken, then some of the blades will be snapped off. In either case the blower needs to be replaced. Disconnect the power wire from the rear of the motor and then connect the power wire to a new blower motor.

    4

    Slide the blower motor into the blower assembly until you hear the clips click. Then screw the assembly back on the firewall. Tighten all the screws down by hand, as high-torque power drivers could crack the assembly. Close the hood and then go around to the trunk to reconnect the negative battery cable. Close the trunk and then turn the BMW 325is on. Turn the fan up and feel for any air. If there is no air flowing, then the power cord was not plugged in flush. Take the blower motor out and reseat the power cord.

How to Troubleshoot a '98 Accord Temperature Sensor

The 1998 Honda Accord was available in DX, EX and LX packages and was equipped with a 2.3-liter VTEC in-line four-cylinder engine in the base model. A 3.0-liter V-6 was also available as an option. The coolant temperature sensor sends a signal to the engine control computer to monitor that the car does not overheat. A bad coolant temperature sensor will give faulty readings, as well as not register a temperature at all on the temperature gauge inside the car.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood of the Accord and set the hood prop. Disconnect the coolant temperature sensor electrical connector, otherwise known as the ECT. The ECT is directly to the left of the throttle body when you are looking at the throttle body side of the V-6 engine The ECT is directly next to the ignition distributor on the front belt side of the four-cylinder engine.

    2

    Set your multimeter to the ohms setting at the 1,000-ohm range. Place the red probe on one of the ECT electrical prongs and the black probe on the second ECT electrical prong. The reading should be 5,000 ohms. Reinstall the ECT electrical connector onto the sensor.

    3

    Start the Accord and set the temperature control switches to full heat, full fan speed and the defrost setting. Allow the engine to run for at least 15 to 20 minutes, until it reaches its normal operating temperature. Shut the engine off.

    4

    Carefully remove the ECT electronic connector so that you do not burn your hand. Place the multimeter's red probe on one of the ECT electrical prongs and the black probe on the second prong. The reading should be between 100 and 400 ohms of resistance. If the primary resistance when the engine was cold was not near 5,000 ohms and the reading now is also off, the coolant temperature sensor is bad.

My 2001 Chevrolet Impala Won't Start

There are a variety of reasons that your 2001 Chevrolet Impala may not start. Starting an Impala requires a starter to catch, a spark to fuel the car, the correct amount of fuel, proper timing in the engine and good compression. If there is a problem with any of these components, the Impala will not start properly. You can do a couple of things to diagnose your Impala before attempting a repair or taking it to the mechanic.

Instructions

    1

    Check your battery. If the battery has been drained or has died, the car will make a clicking noise when attempting to start but will not have enough power to turn the starter. To check the battery, turn the key to the "Accessories" position. Switch on the windshield wipers or the lights. If they do not turn on, the battery could be drained, and you will need to jump start it. If the battery is more than three or four years old, purchase a new one.

    2

    Inspect the fluids in your car. Look at your gas gauge to make sure that you have adequate gas to fuel your car. Check the oil in your engine to see if the level is to the "Full" mark and add oil as needed. If your car is low on oil, it will perform erratically and may even make a loud noise from the area of the gas tank.

    3

    Test your spark plugs with a spark plug tester. Each spark plug in your car fires a specific part of your car, with all the spark plugs working together to start the car. If one spark plug is not working, it will affect the entire system at start-up. Replace any spark plugs as necessary.

    4

    Turn the key in the ignition but do not start the car. Look at your dashboard to see if it is informing you of any issues that your car may be having. The check engine light may be on, which could mean a variety of things, but there are also icons for oil, gas and other common problems. If your car is indicating that there is a problem, chances are this is the reason that your Impala won't start.

How to Clear the Check Engine Light in Your Car

If your Check Engine light in your car comes on, you may want to clear the settings to make sure it was not a misreading. You can do this yourself if your car is a 1996 model or later with an Onboard Diagnostics II (OBD-II) code scanner. You can purchase one of these devices online or at an auto parts store for as little as $30. More expensive consumer grade ones can cost upwards of $100. Once you have one, it is fairly simple to clear the Check Engine light.

Instructions

    1

    Turn on the car but not the ignition. The lights, radio, power locks and windows should all work.

    2

    Locate the OBD-II connector. It is usually located under the dashboard on the driver's side of the car.

    3

    Connect the OBD-II scanner with the connector. Press the Read button on the scanner and wait for it to display a five-digit code. The first digit is a letter followed by four numbers.

    4

    Record the code so you can find out why the check engine light is on. You can cross reference it with a code sheet that comes with the OBD-II scanner or look up the code online.

    5

    Select Erase from the scanner menu. The scanner needs to be hooked up to the connector for it to clear the Check Engine reading from your car. The Check Engine light will come back on after the car has been driven a couple of times if there is still something wrong.

How to Troubleshoot a Chevy S-10 Blazer

How to Troubleshoot a Chevy S-10 Blazer

The Chevy S-10 Blazer was a small sport utility vehicle equipped with a V6 engine and manufactured in two-wheel and four-wheel drive versions, closely resembling the S-10 pickup truck. The 1983 to1994 models do not have a computer managed electronics system and are diagnosed by making mechanical observations. All of the models manufactured after 1994 use a computer diagnostics system, and troubleshooting is accomplished with an electronic reader and through mechanical observations.

Instructions

    1

    Turn the key to start the vehicle. If the engine does not crank and the dash lights are weak or nonexistent, you need to charge the battery. Connect it to a trickle charger and wait until it shows a full charge. Start the vehicle. Replace the battery if continues to fail. The Blazer may also require a new ignition switch.

    2

    Test the alternator if the battery is good but the vehicle continues to lose power. Test the alternator with a voltage meter and replace it if there is not electric output. If you continue to jump start a good battery, it will eventually be ruined.

    3

    Drive the Blazer and feel for changes in the engine power. Sputtering and surging indicates a bad fuel pump. The S-10 may also have clogged injectors or a bad fuel pressure regulator. Replace the fuel pump and clean the injectors.

    4

    Drive the vehicle at different speeds to test the shifting in the transmission. If the transmission rumbles or stalls when sifting, it must be serviced. The transmission valve body is a common failure on S-10 Blazers.

    5

    Test the brakes at slow speeds. If the brakes vibrate violently while stopping, the wheel sensor may be bad. Plug an electronic reader into the dash to test the sensor. Replace the sensor immediately if it fails.

Senin, 28 Juni 2010

Differential Problems on the Nissan Titan

Differential Problems on the Nissan Titan

A search of the database of official Nissan recalls since the Titan was introduced in 2004 reveals no recalls for matters related to the Titan differential. A search of consumer complaints tells a different story.

Leaky Axle Seals

    Axles contain a seal at the point where the axle extends out of the axle casing to connect to the hub of the wheel. The purpose is to keep the grease inside the grease-packed casing, which also holds the differential. Numerous complaints have been logged regarding the axle seals on the Nissan Titan, according to Lemon Law Claims.

Not Part of Regular Maintenance

    Axle seals are factory installed. They are not part of any scheduled maintenance check. For this reason, leaky axle seals are not usually detected until something major has gone wrong.

Diagnosis

    If a Titan has a leaking axle seal, the backside of the wheel next to the seal will be coated with an oily substance.

Remedy

    Axle seals can be replaced if the problem is caught early. Unfortunately, because of the location of the source of the problem, catching it early is rare good luck. In most cases, the first inkling the driver has that something is wrong is a smell or a noise. The smell is caused by the differential heating up due to friction. The noise is the dry gears of the differential grinding on each other. If the problem has progressed to the where the differential is acting up, the only remedy is to have the axle, differential and all, replaced.

Problems With Water in Gas

Problems With Water in Gas

Vehicle engines gain power by burning fuel. When there is water mixed in with the fuel, your car or truck won't run as well as it should, because water is not combustible and will not burn. Water in your gasoline can cause significant problems for your vehicle and lead to costly repairs, so it is important to handle the situation appropriately if you suspect your car has a bad tank of gasoline. In some circumstances, it may be necessary to have a mechanic pump out the bad gas manually rather allowing running the vehicle on contaminated fuel.

Ethanol and Water

    Almost all gasoline sold in the U.S. contains ethanol, which is an alcohol-based chemical added to fuel in order to help reduce pollution and conserve fuel resources. However, ethanol binds to water and, if there is enough water in your fuel, the ethanol and the water will separate from the gasoline and settle at the bottom of your fuel tank. Your car cannot run on this mixture and will experience serious engine malfunctions when this substance reaches your motor.

Running Poorly

    A small amount of water in your vehicle's gasoline will affect the quality of the fuel mixture. If your engine is getting intermittent doses of non-combustible water along with the gasoline, it will spit, sputter and may even stall. Fortunately, a fuel treatment or additive can help with this problem.

Poor Fuel Economy

    Cars will not run on water. If your car has water mixed in with its fuel, it will require more actual gasoline to keep running to counter-act the water. If your car has a tank of gasoline that is 95 percent gasoline and 5 percent water, your car will experience at least a 5 percent decrease in fuel economy for that tank of gas. This occurs because 5 percent of the fluid in the gas tank is essentially useless if not downright harmful.

Minggu, 27 Juni 2010

How Does a Clutch Get Damaged?

How Does a Clutch Get Damaged?

Clutch disc failure is one of the inevitable perils you face when trusting a human being to do a job most often left to machines. But even if you're perfectly genteel with the clutch, it's still going to wear out eventually anyway. Comfort yourself with the fact that it's a small price to pay for driving your car without computer nannies doing your thinking for you.

Normal Wear and Tear

    Like brake shoes, all clutches wear out over time. Even if you slip the clutch as little as possible, the friction disc itself isn't likely to last the life of the engine or transmission without needing replacement at some point. The pressure plate springs that hold the clutch disc to the flywheel will eventually weaken and cause clutch slippage, and you can probably expect throwout bearing or clutch slave cylinder failure at some point.

Clutch Overheating

    Clutch material is like brake pad material in more than one respect, prime among them being that even one overheating event can permanently glaze the material surface. Afterward, the clutch disc loses its ability to grip the flywheel and develops a tendency to slip. Failure is progressive from there; every time the clutch slips, it gets a little worse until it stops working at all. You might be able to put off clutch failure for a while after one severe overheating, but it'll never be the same until you replace the disc.

Water in the Clutch

    A wet clutch isn't necessarily ruined as long as you give it time to dry out, but it may be if you drive the car before it does. Water soaks into the clutch material, which itself is something like resin-impregnated cork. Once it gets wet, the clutch loses some of its ability to grip the flywheel and starts to slip, generating heat and turning the impregnated water into steam. The steam expands in the friction material's pores, literally ripping the material to shreds from the inside out like an egg in a microwave.

Oil on the Clutch

    This is a fairly common failure for older engines and transmissions, and comes as a result of a failed rear main seal on the engine or front seal on the transmission. Hot oil has little more viscosity than water, which means that it soaks into the clutch disc just like water. But unlike water, oil in the clutch won't dry out after a while -- it'll sit there for years, waiting for you to attempt to send power through the clutch and to the transmission. Once you do, the clutch slips, overheats and burns out.

Signs & Symptoms of Rear Main Seal Leaking

Signs & Symptoms of Rear Main Seal Leaking

The rear main seal, or rear main bearing seal, is a gasket between the engine and the transmission of an automobile. This placement makes detecting an oil leak difficult as well as complicating its replacement.

Oil Spots

    The most common sign of a leaking rear main seal is oil spots on a driveway or garage floor where the vehicle is parked for long periods of time. Oil may leak from multiple areas of the engine, but the rear main seal is one of the most frequent sources of a leak.

Smoke

    Often leaking oil from a rear main seal will drip onto the vehicle's exhaust and cause smoke to come from under the car. Smoke coming out of the tailpipe is a sign that the engine is burning oil, not a leaking rear main seal.

Accumulation of Debris

    Leaking oil acts as an adhesive on the bottom of the car. Dirt and other road debris will stick to surfaces covered with oil. An accumulation of dirt and other debris at the junction of the engine and transmission is a good indicator of a rear main seal oil leak.

How do I Troubleshoot the Door Locks on a 1994 Buick Regal?

Door locks on the 1994 Buick Regal include the lock buttons and lock actuators, as well as the mechanical connecting rods. Both the lock button and the lock actuator are apt to short circuit sooner or later, and both present an equal opportunity for lock system failure. Troubleshooting the door lock system is a process of trial and error that eventually leads you to the part you must replace in order to return the lock system to functionality. Anyone who's mechanically inclined and has an hour or so to dedicate to this task can perform it.

Instructions

    1

    Pry the power window button out of the door with the working lock using the trim tool. Unplug the working lock button from the Regal's wiring harness by hand.

    2

    Pry the power window button out of the door with the non-working lock with the trim tool. Unplug the button from the Regal's wiring harness by hand.

    3

    Plug the working lock button into the Regal's wiring harness in the door with the non-working lock system. Push the lock button to lock or unlock the door. If the lock works, replace the lock button you previously removed from this door; if not, the door lock actuator is the faulty part you must replace.

Sabtu, 26 Juni 2010

How to Diagnose a Bad PCM in a Dodge Cummins

How to Diagnose a Bad PCM in a Dodge Cummins

A powertrain control module (PCM) monitors functions and sensors within a Dodge pick-up's Cummins diesel engine. Once the PCM locates a problem, it assigns an error code. If the problem persists, the PCM turns on the Dodge's "check engine" light. This is all part of the Environmental Protection Agency's standardization of On-Board Diagnostics. The system also has self-diagnostic capabilities: Once a Dodge's PCM ceases to work, a trouble code is generated. Checking for PCM malfunctions is similar to checking the OBD-II system: You need a code reader or a diagnostic scanner.

Instructions

    1

    Research OBD-II codes -- you will need to find two sets: Generic OBD-II codes are universal to all post-1996 vehicles, and they are usually found in your code reader or scanner's user's manual. Chrysler uses an additional set, one that is particular to all vehicles in the Chrysler family. You will need to locate these codes either online or in a Haynes repair manual.

    2

    Read through both sets of trouble codes: Make a list of all the codes that deal with the PCM. For example, code P1602 refers to the PCM not being programmed. P1696 and P1670 deal with particular types of computer failure within the PCM. Place this list of codes in the Dodge's center console.

    3

    Connect your code reader or diagnostic scanner to the Dodge's Data Link Connector. The DLC outlet will be positioned differently in different models that use a Cummins engine. However, it will usually be found within the driver's side leg space: either beneath, to the left or to the right of the steering column.

    4

    Turn either the code reader or the scanner and the Dodge's electrical "on." Some brands and types of diagnostic hardware will also need the engine to be idling. If you own such a device, start the Dodge's engine at this time.

    5

    Look at the code reader or scanner's small display screen. If you do not see diagnostic codes displayed, you will have to retrieve them. Retrieval commands differ according to the brand and type of device. Buttons are located in different positions. Consult your device's manual for the exact instructions to follow.

    6

    Scroll through the codes retrieved. Since you are looking for PCM functionality, you can ignore any code listed as "pending." Consult your list of PCM-related trouble codes. If the code reader or scanner did not retrieve PCM-related codes, then the component is working and is not in need of troubleshooting. If you do see PCM-related codes, then the module itself may need to be reprogrammed or replaced. You may need to consult a Chrysler-approved mechanic. PCM modules are usually not "off the shelf" merchandise, and you will need to order one that meets your Dodge's exact needs.

Jumat, 25 Juni 2010

What Would Cause a Diesel Truck to Stall & the Gauges to Quit Working?

What Would Cause a Diesel Truck to Stall & the Gauges to Quit Working?

Simplicity is one of the best things about diesel engines. Diesel engines are fuel-throttled and don't require spark plugs, which means that about the only way you can kill one is to run it out of fuel. But modern electronic controls throw a whole new monkey wrench into the works, increasing the engine's versatility, but also increasing the sheer number of ways in which it can fail.

Stalling Basics

    A diesel engine won't typically just outright die unless it's suddenly deprived of fuel. Non-fuel-related failures will typically result in stumbling, bogging and loss of power that ultimately results in engine stalling. In olden days, the only way to interrupt a diesel's fuel supply was to physically disable the injection pump. But that's only true of the engine itself; in the real world, there are a number of things that can shut the injection pump off to kill the engine.

Injector Driver Failure

    Modern common-rail injection systems are to diesels what electronic fuel injection is to gas engines. Electronically controlled injectors can fail in any number of ways, but very few will stall the entire engine. More often than not, an injector failure will result in a single-cylinder misfire, but no stalling. The only way you'll experience system-wide failure with electronically controlled injectors is if either the injector driver -- the computer -- fails, or if it loses its power supply.

Vehicle Networking

    There aren't too many places in your truck where the engine-control systems meet the gauges. True, the engine delivers a signal to the gauges, but that's a one-way street of electrical flow. Both work through the same junction box -- fuse panel -- so a short in the primary power supply isn't impossible. This will cause the engine to stall if it relies upon the main power supply in any way, which many modern diesel engines do.

The Probable Cause

    Given the relative paucity of interactions between gauges and engine, it's fairly safe to assume that there's been some sort of short or failure in the ignition key mechanism. The ignition switch is the crossroads between your engine controls and power supply to the dash, so you're likely looking at either a faulty ignition switch or a loose or malfunctioning ignition switch wiring harness.

Symptoms of Clutch Problems

Symptoms of Clutch Problems

People who have a car with a manual transmission usually like the control over power and acceleration they get on the open road. But along with the advantages of manual shifting comes the potential for problems with the clutch on the vehicle. The clutch makes it possible to easily shift from one gear to the next by pressing a pedal. Like many other components on an automobile, clutches eventually wear out and have problems. Being able to identify a clutch problem will alert you to get your car to the shop before you find yourself unable to shift gears.

Slippage

    Slippage is a clutch problem that occurs when the pressure plate is unable to hold the friction disc against the flywheel tightly when the clutch is engaged. This causes the disc to rotate at a different speed than the flywheel. The high temperature caused by friction against the disc will eventually damage the clutch plate and necessitate a replacement. On clutches with mechanical linkage, adjustment can forestall replacement for a time.

    If you notice the engine revving abnormally as the clutch is released, and the car accelerates gradually, then it could be a slippage problem. It's possible that grease or oil on the disc is causing the slippage or the engine mount could be broken, causing the linkage to be bound up by an improperly moving engine.

    Another common cause of slippage is when the friction plate is simply worn out from use. A clutch will not last forever, and over time the clutch will begin slipping. Adjustments will not fix this problem, as a worn out friction plate will require complete replacement.

Vibration

    A grabbing or chattering clutch is an indicator that there is a problem inside the clutch mechanism. It is an easily noticed problem. Symptoms include a vibration or jerking as the clutch is released, especially when accelerating from a stop. This problem may be the result of a damaged or broken disc, flywheel or pressure plate. It may also be caused by loose springs or worn engine mounts, according to the Integrated Publishing website on Clutch Troubleshooting.

Squeal or Chirp

    Noises associated with clutch problems are difficult to diagnose because the sounds can mean many different things. If you hear chirping or squealing when you use the clutch, have it checked.

    When squealing or chirping starts or stops whenever you press down the clutch pedal, then there is a good possibility it is a worn or damaged release bearing or pilot bushing. Other problems that accompany this noise include problems with a worn release fork, input shaft or improper installation of the friction disc. Other noises, such as growling when the pedal is engaged, are also signs of trouble.

Gear Changing Problems

    Clutch release problems can cause a variety of symptoms that drastically affect the driving experience. If the clutch will not disengage completely, the disc will continue spinning and prevent the driver from getting the car into gear from neutral. It may also cause the gears to grind when the car is put into gear and potentially cause stalling when the car rolls to a stop, according to the Automotive Parts Network website. When the clutch does not disengage from the flywheel it is usually the result of a leak or air in the hydraulic system, or improperly adjusted mechanical linkage.

How to Troubleshoot the Explorer Backup Sensor

How to Troubleshoot the Explorer Backup Sensor

The latest Ford Explorer vehicles are sold with optional RADAR collision avoidance systems, backup cameras and other safety features, including a backup sensor that Ford calls a Reverse Sensing System (RSS). RSS sounds a tone to warn the driver of obstacles adjacent to the back bumper under certain circumstances. Problems with the RSS system can be related to speed, types of objects encountered and vehicle add-ons (like trailer hitches). These kinds of issues can be corrected by following some troubleshooting.

Instructions

    1

    Reduce the reversing speed to below 3 mph if the system doesn't warn you of objects. The system isn't designed to be used at speeds over 3 mph.

    2

    Make sure that you're not trying to use the RSS in environments that it's not designed for if you continue to have problems. The system is designed for flat, parking-lot-type driving. It will only work in reverse, and may not work in rain or snow. Large and fixed objects are sensed best. Objects that are angular, small, close to the ground or moving may not be detectable to the system.

    3

    Remove bike racks, hunting racks and other trailer-like attachments if the RSS creates false alarms. The system is detecting the trailer hitch gear. Disable the system using the control in the dashboard Message System when towing or using hitch apparatus. Scroll through until you find the setting.

Kamis, 24 Juni 2010

How to Troubleshoot a Half Shaft

How to Troubleshoot a Half Shaft

Half shafts, also called intermediate shafts, serve as connection points between the trans-axle (transmission) and the drive wheels. They appear on front-wheel drive vehicles, and are sometimes used on rear wheel drive vehicles with independent suspension. Two half shafts sit on either side of the front-wheel drive transmission, with some half shafts longer than others, depending on the mounting position of the transmission. They contain connection points at the inner and outer CV (constant velocity) joints, and sometimes are supported by a carrier housing and tripod bearing. Half shafts display a number of failure warning signs that a vehicle owner can discover, by using a few testing procedures and observations.

Instructions

    1

    Drive the vehicle through a normal range of speeds, accelerating and decelerating. Note any vibration in the chassis floorboard, or a vibration felt in the steering wheel. The vibration will be most pronounced upon acceleration from a dead stop. The likely cause, provided the CV joints are in good condition, will point to excessive wear in the half shaft carrier or tripod bearing.

    2

    Listen for a "clunk" when putting the transmission selector in forward or reverse gear. The cause will most likely be the inner or outer CV joint bearings, where they connect with the half shaft. If the half shaft has a rubber damper, the damper could be split, torn or partially disconnected, causing excessive play.

    3

    Listen for a humming sound while driving through all speed ranges, but particularly during acceleration from low to medium speeds. There may also be a metallic growling or swishing sound, like that of a failed bearing grinding within a bearing race.

    4

    Raise the vehicle with a floor jack high enough to place two jack stands under the rear frame and two jack stands under the front frame. Take a shop light under the vehicle and inspect both half shafts, where they join to the inner and outer CV joints. If one shaft has a carrier housing, sometimes called a "hanger," check the mounting bolts on the hanger, to see if they are missing or broken. The carrier housing should be aligned properly and have no play, fully supporting the half shaft.

    5

    Look for indications of thrown and splattered grease in the half shaft connection points to the inner and outer CV joints. Grease will appear on the trans-axle housing, firewall or on the shafts and CV joint boots. Examine the CV joint boots for any tears, or loose boot clamps. They outer CV joint boot and bearing assembly will usually wear and fail first, so check both outer CV joint boots. Wipe the boots down with rags and inspect them carefully. A torn boot will allow water and dirt to contaminate the bearing, causing excessive wear.

Rabu, 23 Juni 2010

How to Test for a Leaking Air Conditioning System

How to Test for a Leaking Air Conditioning System

When your car's air conditioning system fails to blow cold air, one cause could be a refrigerant leak. If you add refrigerant to your system needlessly and without properly diagnosing a leak, however, you may end up overcharging the system and damaging it permanently. In order to avoid causing harm to your car's A/C system, you can confirm that a leak is the culprit in just a few minutes with the right tools.

Instructions

Testing with a "Sniffer"

    1

    Purchase a hand-held sniffer. A sniffer is an electrical device capable of scanning any suspected areas for a variety of refrigerants. Turn the sniffer on and set it to scan.

    2

    Pass the sniffer's probe over any possibly leaking areas. In order for the sniffer to work effectively, you should move it around the area at a rate of about one inch per second.

    3

    Listen for any signals from the sniffer. Most sniffers alert the user of a refrigerant leak with an alarm or a buzzer, though some models just flash their lights. If your sniffer does not detect any refrigerants, your A/C system's failure might not be a leak after all.

Testing with Fluorescent Dye

    4

    Purchase a fluorescent dye UV detection system. Most kits come with the dye, a pair of yellow goggles or glasses which allow you to see the fluorescent dye and a fluorescent light.

    5

    Follow the directions provided by the manufacturer when adding the dye. Do not add more dye than instructed to by the user guide.

    6

    Turn the car on and turn the A/C system to full blast for several minutes to ensure proper distribution.

    7

    Put the goggles on that are provided by the kit and thoroughly examine your A/C system with a fluorescent light. The goggles will allow you to spot any leak that you have.

Selasa, 22 Juni 2010

How to Check a 1998 Blazer Fuel Pump

How to Check a 1998 Blazer Fuel Pump

Chevrolet introduced the S-10 Blazer in 1983, and eliminated the "S-10" portion of the name in 1996 when the full size Blazer became the Tahoe. The 1998 Chevrolet Blazer was equipped with a 4.3-liter "Vortec" V-6, capable of producing up to 190-horsepower and 250-foot-pounds of torque. The 1998 Blazer is electronically fuel injected. Over time the fuel pump or other fuel system components can wear down. Testing the fuel pump is a medium difficulty project, which should take no longer than one hour even if you have never done this work before.

Instructions

    1

    Raise the hood of the Blazer and visually locate the shiny metal tubing that runs along the top side of the engine. This tubing is called the fuel rail, which is responsible for feeding the fuel to the injectors. Locate the driver's side fuel rail, then the fuel pressure testing port on top of the fuel rail. Remove the cap that is identical to a tire valve stem cap, as this is the pressure testing port cap. Turn the cap counterclockwise to remove it, by hand.

    2

    Install a fuel pressure tester unit onto the fuel rail pressure testing port. Turn the pressure tester line until it is snug, unless the tester line has a quick connect fitting. Make sure you have a good hold on the fuel pressure tester port with the tester by pulling it back slightly to test the fitting.

    3

    Ask an assistant or second person to turn the engine on in the Blazer. If the engine will not turn on, ask your assistant to turn the engine over for no longer than three second intervals. Longer than three seconds will damage the starter and possibly engine components.

    4

    Read the dial on the pressure tester while the key is being turned, or while the engine is on. The dial gauge should be between 55 and 61 p.s.i., or pounds per square inch. If the dial does not reach this pressure during engine turn over or while the engine is running, then there is a problem in your fuel delivery system.

    5

    Ask your assistant to turn the Blazer off. Remove the pressure tester from the engine and replace the tester port cap immediately. Shut the hood on the Blazer, and work your way over to the fuel filler door.

    6

    Open the fuel filler door and remove the gas cap. Place your ear next to the fuel filler hole for the next series of tests. This audible testing will let you know if your fuel pump is indeed working or not.

    7

    Ask your assistant to turn the ignition key to the "Accessories" or "II" position, without turning on the engine. Tell them to turn the key to this position, then count to three and turn it back off. Your job during this cycle of testing is to listen for an audible electronic delivery noise. The fuel pump and sending unit will engage when the key turned. Listen for a high pitched motorized noise when the key is placed in "Accessories". If you do not hear a noise when the key is turned to accessories, then your fuel pump is not working properly.

    8

    Ask your assistant to turn the engine on for five seconds, and then turn it off. If the engine will not start, ask your assistant to turn the engine over for no longer than three second intervals. Your job during this step is to listen for an audible "gurgling" noise, or liquid movement in the fuel tank. If the fuel pump is working you will hear a "tinkling" or "gurgling" sound through the filler hole. If your engine will not turn over and you do not hear any noise from the fuel tank, then your fuel pump is not working correctly.

Senin, 21 Juni 2010

Remedies for a Clutch Fork Rattle

Remedies for a Clutch Fork Rattle

The clutch system in a vehicle is an interconnected series of mechanisms that allow the vehicle to start, stop and change speeds. The system is made up of many pieces including the clutch fork.

Clutch Fork

    A clutch fork, also called a withdrawal fork, is a lever that releases the clutch. This allows the car to coast if moving, or idle if stopped. A bearing is pressed, causing the release of the clutch from the flywheel, which is connected to the transmission. Once the clutch is disengaged, the car's running motor is no longer connected to the transmission.

Rattling

    Many vehicles are equipped with an anti-rattle spring that attaches to the clutch fork and a ball bearing. If this spring becomes disengaged from the bearing and fork, it will move around while in idle and cause a rattling noise.

Pivot Ball Bearing

    The pivot ball bearing fits into a socket where it should be firmly held in place by the spring whether the clutch is engaged or disengaged. Rattling is caused by the ball moving around loosely in the socket.

Minggu, 20 Juni 2010

What Does an SRS Light on a Dodge Stealth Mean?

What Does an SRS Light on a Dodge Stealth Mean?

The Supplementary Restraint System or SRS light is an indicator that something is amiss in the airbag system in your Dodge Stealth. Unfortunately, there are several problems that could trigger the SRS indicator.

Causes

    The SRS light could indicate the following: low battery power, bad sensor, blown fuse, loose wire, unplugged battery, bad clock spring, G-Force sensor problems, bad reverse light on the transmission, airbags were recently deployed, defective or unplugged airbags, or that aftermarket gauges have been installed and are interfering with the SRS system.

Diagnoses

    Diagnose the exact problem either through process of elimination, or through a DRBII (diagnostic readout box, version 2) system. Fix the issue and reset the SRS computer. This can be done at most Dodge dealerships. In some cases, the SRS indicator turns off after turning the car on and off 10 or more times without actually starting the car.

Repair

    If the SRS light comes back on after you reset the SRS computer or have it reset, there is a problem in the airbag system, as opposed to a malfunction with the indicator. Take your vehicle in for diagnoses and repair.

My Nissan Altima Won't Restart and Is Hot

Driving your Nissan Altima for long periods of time in hot weather may cause your vehicle to not start or to run hot. Improper maintenance on the vehicle will also contribute to these problems. Knowing how to take care of the vehicle and provide preventative maintenance on the car will keep your car running and avoid overheating.

Instructions

    1

    Release the hood lever located under the steering wheel near the pedals. Walk to the front of the vehicle and pull the hood up.

    2

    Locate the container on the left-side of the vehicle that has "Coolant" written on the black top. Put your hand on top of the black top to feel if it is hot. Unscrew the black top counter-clockwise. If it is hot wait for 30 minutes before unscrewing it.

    3

    Check the coolant level in the "Coolant" container. If you see no liquid in the container, pour coolant into the container until it reaches the "Full" line on the side of the container.

    4

    Screw the black top back on the container clockwise. Locate the battery under the hood on the driver-side of the car. Tighten the battery terminals clockwise with a wrench. Crank the vehicle. Look under the vehicle and check for any leaks while the car is running.

    5

    Turn on the heater. Check under the car for any leaks. Allow the car to run for five minutes. Turn the car off. Wait one minute. Turn the car back on to test if it still starts.

Pacifica Remote Start Issues

Pacifica Remote Start Issues

The Chrysler Pacifica has exhibited problems with its remote start control. A technical service bulletin (TSB) published by the manufacturing covers some of the remote start problems Pacifica owners have experienced. Though only a few specific issues can occur with the controller, these problems can prevent it from working properly, potentially leading to difficulties getting into your Pacifica.

Dead Battery

    The remote start on the Pacifica runs on a battery in the handset. This battery drains over time, preventing the remote start from working. You can easily replace the battery by going to a local dealership and purchasing a new one. You must reprogram the remote start if it does not work properly after you replace the battery.

Remote Starter Inoperative

    A TSB published on the Pacifica concerns the remote starter failing. This remote start problem stems from a switch in the hood of the Pacifica failing. The hood switch failure does not allow the remote start to work because it causes the remote start control to read an error in the system. You must replace the hood switch before the remote start will work properly.

Programming

    The remote start on the Pacifica occasionally requires reprogramming for no specific reason, causing you to have to use the ignition key occasionally. If the remote start does not work, try starting the Pacifica with the ignition key and then attempting the remote start once again.

LED Light

    The remote start on the Pacifica sends a signal to the receiver on the vehicle. The receiver can fail, preventing the remote start from working. A LED light flashes on the remote start controller if the remote start is working properly. The LED light on the controller flashes as an indicator of a problem with the receiver.

Sabtu, 19 Juni 2010

Signs of Bad Mass Air Flow Meter on 2004 Altima

Signs of Bad Mass Air Flow Meter on 2004 Altima

If your 2004 Nissan Altima is hard to start, idles rough, hesitates and stalls, your mass airflow meter might be the problem. If your 2004 Altima has mass airflow meter problems, your powertrain records a P0100 to P0104 fault code. A service technician attaches a scanner to the wiring system of your powertrain to read the diagnostic codes. The mass airflow meter may need cleaning to restore normal operation of your fuel injection system.

Hesitation and Stalling

    The mass aIrflow meter is located inside the air filter housing or between the air filter and the multiport fuel injection throttle body. The mass airflow meter measures the volume of air entering the running engine. The powertrain control module uses input from the mass airflow sensor to vary the amount of fuel into the engine. Hesitation and stalling may be due to cheap gasoline with less detergent and cheap additives. Liquid fuel injector plus intake valve cleaner poured into the gas tank might solve the problem. Liquid fuel injector cleaner removes moisture from the gasoline, and cleans deposits from fuel additives off the throttle body and air flow meter. An aerosol electronics cleaner recommended by the dealer or auto parts store may clean the mass air meter.

Backfires

    A cheap air filter contributes to mass air flow problems. A dirty or faulty mass air meter may cause backfires and the "Check Engine" light to come on. Backfires must be checked by a professional. The throttle can cause backfires. If the mass air meter sensor is filthy, too little air goes into the engine, and the fuel mixture is lean. Fuel injection timing may be four times slower than normal. When pressure builds suddenly in the intake manifold, the engine backfires. Backfires can damage your mass air meter. The ignition coil can also cause backfires. The relay that powers the mass air meter may be faulty.

Hard to Start, Rough Idle

    Deposits in the combustion chamber increase compression, which makes your Altima hard to start and causes it to idle roughly. Cleaning the fuel injectors, throttle body, intake valves, tracks and combustion chambers in the car is the easiest way to clean them. Cleaning fuel injectors is a dangerous task because both the cleaner and the gasoline are highly flammable. Strong solvent may damage rubber and plastic parts of the fuel pump, fuel regulator and fuel lines. The service technician must where eye protection and skin covering to disconnect the pressurized fuel lines and check for leaks. The fuel injection system is cleaned by running astringent solvent through the running engine.

How to Diagnose Motorcycle Fuel System Problems

How to Diagnose Motorcycle Fuel System Problems

As a motorcycle owner, you have probably experienced one of the most common problems in the motorcycle field, related to the fuel/carburetor system. Problems usually occur when the motorcycle has been sitting for long periods of time without use, and without the gas being drained. If this is the case, the gasoline in the tank slowly trickles down into the carburetor, dries out and could form dirt or corrosion in the passages of the carburator.

Instructions

    1
    Fuel systems benefit from regular cleaning.
    Fuel systems benefit from regular cleaning.

    Listen for poor idle characteristics when you start your motorcycle; the sound will be either too lean or too rich. Look for unstable idle and/or fouled plugs. These are usually signs of combustion problems. Internal combustion engines need three things in order to run properly: they must have a good quality fuel, compression and a spark delivered to the compressed fuel/air mixed at the appropriate time or very close to it.

    Be alert to how your motorcycle reacts when accelerating through all gears; if the throttle hesitates or lacks response, you could definitely be having combustion problems. Perform regular cleaning to your motorcycle's fuel system to avoid future problems.

    2

    Consult your bike's shop manual for instructions on how to disassemble the carburator, since it may vary according to the model. Test your motorcycle at both low and high throttle conditions.

    3

    Listen for backfiring, spitting and coughing; these typically indicate that one or more cylinders are too lean, which would also be a sign of fuel problems.

Jumat, 18 Juni 2010

How to Troubleshoot a 1998 Chevy Blazer

How to Troubleshoot a 1998 Chevy Blazer

The 1998 Chevy Blazer was manufactured in two-wheel and four-wheel drive models with either a five-speed manual transmission or a four-speed manual transmission. It was also made in two and four door models with both having a backseat with room for three passengers. The vehicle has a 4.3-liter V-6 engine, and it features power steering, air conditioning and a rear storage area. Troubleshoot the Blazer by monitoring the engine performance and making basic mechanical observations.

Instructions

    1

    Have the electrical system professionally serviced if the gauges fail, the hazard lights fail, the engine shuts down through the security system or the brakes randomly engage without driver assistance. All of these problems are traced to issues in the electrical system and many are associated with recalls.

    2

    Clean the fuel injectors if the engine cranks but does not start. The injection system can become clogged with grime and can fail to supply fuel to the engine. Also check the injectors for leaking fuel. The injectors must be replaced if they are leaking.

    3

    Drive the vehicle and monitor the engine for power as you accelerate. The fuel pump must be replaced if the engine sputters and fails to supply power relative to the amount of pressure placed on the gas pedal. Also monitor the Blazer for steering difficulty. Replace the power steering pump if the steering wheel is stiff and requires a large amount of strength to turn.

    4

    Monitor the transmission performance as your drive. If the transmission slips, fails to shift or grinds, it must be flushed and refilled with new fluid. If the problem continues, the transmission may require a rebuild. Also pay attention for pulling to one side after shifting out of four-wheel drive. The 1998 Blazer may stick in four-wheel drive, causing you to shift in and out until it disengages.

    5

    Inspect the engine for leaks and check the fluid levels. If the fluids are low and major leaks are evident, inspect further for blown gaskets. The manifold gasket and intake gasket will cause engine failure if the seal breaks. Replace the gasket and the fluids to solve the problem.

Kamis, 17 Juni 2010

My Nissan Versa Won't Start

My Nissan Versa Won't Start

The Versa is a compact vehicle manufactured and sold by Nissan Motors. The Versa's major benefit is its economical gas mileage. Like all vehicles, the Nissan Versa may have problems starting at some point. If you are having trouble starting your Versa, there are a few things that you can check prior to calling in a professional to diagnose the problem. Checking for these simple problems can save time and money in the long run.

Instructions

    1

    Insert your key into the ignition and try to turn it. If the key does not turn, adjust the steering wheel until it locks then try turning the key again. If the steering wheel is not locked, the key will not turn and your Versa will not start.

    2

    Check that the car has enough gas for the engine to start. If you are unsure about the fuel level, add a gallon of gas and retry starting the engine.

    3

    Open the hood and check the fluid levels in the car, including the oil, transmission fluid and coolant. A lack of or low fluid levels can cause engine starting problems in the Versa.

    4

    Turn the key in the ignition to the "Accessories" position then turn on the interior lights or headlights. If the lights do not turn on, the battery is likely drained and needs to be jump-started, charged or replaced.

    5

    Attempt to start the engine and listen for any unusual noises. Clicking noises could indicate a faulty starter. If the engine starts briefly then shuts off, there could be a fuel line or pump problem. If you hear nothing at all, your Versa may have a faulty ignition switch.

My 1995 Chevy Astro Van Won't Start

My 1995 Chevy Astro Van Won't Start

Over time, any vehicle can break down and not start. Typically, if a car won't start that means there is a problem with the battery or ignition. You can examine the engine of your vehicle to ensure that these parts of your 1995 Astro are functioning. To avoid situations in which your Chevy Astro won't start, change your oil frequently and take your van into a body shop for a tune-up once every year.

Instructions

    1

    Set your digital voltage meter to "Volts D/C." Pop the lid of the engine and touch the digital volt meter to the negative battery post. The battery should read about 12 volts. If the measurement is under 11 volts, the battery needs further charging and may need to be replaced.

    2

    Examine the starter of the battery. Touch the positive end of the meter to the battery terminal. This terminal is located on the rear of the starter. Touch the black side of the digital volt meter to the frame of your van. Note the voltage on the digital meter. It should be about the same as the voltage of the battery. If the voltage is higher or lower, the connector cables of the battery might have problems. Examine the battery to ensure that the cables are connected appropriately.

    3

    Locate the throttle body in the engine. The throttle is just to the left of the battery. Remove the air duct that attaches to this body. Spray carburetor spray through the throttle body and replace the air duct.

    4

    Disconnect the wire that connects to the ignition coil. The coil is located near the back of the engine, right next to the middle of the dash. Insert your key into the ignition of your van and turn the key clockwise to start the engine. If you do not see a spark, your coil and ignition have a problem and may require replacement. If you see a spark, reconnect the coils. Your car should be able to start.

How to Tell When a Fuel Pump Needs to Be Replaced

How to Tell When a Fuel Pump Needs to Be Replaced

As fuel pumps on most newer vehicles are part of an integrated computerized electrical system, determining if the pump itself is faulty is a process of elimination. To know if the fuel pump is working properly, you also must know if the Integrated Relay Control Module (IRCM), which sends the electrical signal to the fuel pump, is functioning or if there is a leak in the fuel line. Additionally, fuel pump pressure varies widely among vehicle makes and models, and just a few pounds difference can create problems. Start by testing the pump's motor by bypassing the IRCM with a jumper lead.

Instructions

Fuel Pump and Integrated Relay Control Module

    1

    Strip the ends of the three-foot wire with the electrical pliers and attach one alligator clip to each end, creating a jumper wire.

    2

    Lift the hood and disconnect the wire from the fuel pump's positive (power) terminal (connects to the IRCM). Depending on vehicle, and fuel pump make and model, the wire may be connected with a fitting requiring a screwdriver or wrench to remove. If it is a plug-type connector, firmly grasp one half in each hand and pull apart.

    3

    Attach an alligator clip from one end of the jumper wire to the positive terminal of the battery. Touch the other end of the jumper wire to the positive terminal of the fuel pump.

    4

    Listen for the fuel pump to turn on. If it does not activate, it needs to be replaced. Hearing the pump's motor and fuel moving through the lines is an indication the bypassed IRCM is faulty.

Fuel Pump and Line Pressure

    5

    Remove the negative battery cable.

    6

    Relieve the pressure in the fuel system. First, remove the gas tank cap to vent the pressure in the fuel tank. Next, loosen the fuel filter. On some automobile models the fuel filter will be located inside the fuel line, where the line attaches to the carburetor or fuel injection body. Loosen this type with a wrench. Other automobile models will have a canister type filter attached by clamps between two sections of flexible fuel line. For this type squeeze the clamps with a pair of pliers or loosen with a screwdriver (depending on the type of clamp) and slide the clamps back far enough to free the filter from the line. Finally, wrap a rag around the fuel pump to catch the overspray, and use a wrench to loosen the fuel input line at the fuel pump. Retighten the fuel line, fuel filter line and gas cap.

    7

    Attach the fuel pressure gauge to the test port and energize the fuel pump by turning the ignition to the "on" position. It is not necessary to start the vehicle. Check the pressure reading against the specifications for your vehicle. If it is low, the pump should be replaced.

    8

    Turn the ignition off. An immediate pressure drop indicates a leak in the fuel line.

How to Check for Engine Trouble

How to Check for Engine Trouble

Engine trouble can come in a variety of forms, and the symptoms can include noises, smells, and decreased driving capabilities. Many of these symptoms also have multiple causes, so troubleshooting the engine entirely can be very time consuming if you do not know exactly what you are looking for. All cars and light trucks sold in the United States, however, use a standard system for engine diagnostics. This system tracks the occurrence and frequency of every malfunction with the engine. Checking this system first will save a lot of troubleshooting time.

Instructions

    1

    Look in the leg space on the driver's side of the vehicle. Somewhere beneath the dashboard, you will find an outlet called a "Data Link Connector." The DLC is the gateway to the OBD-II system. The location varies by make and model, but in most vehicles the DLC can be found in the general vicinity of the steering column (see Resources).

    2

    Plug your OBD-II scanner into the DLC. The scanner will have a diagnostic cable that ends in a 16-pin plug. The DLC contains 16-pin receivers, and it will accommodate the scanner's cable.

    3

    Press the scanner's "On" button. You will not have to do this with some diagnostic handhelds, however. Some devices are preset with an auto-starting feature, once a connection with a vehicle's computer is sensed.

    4

    Turn your vehicle's ignition key to "On." This will turn the electrical system on, which will also activate the vehicle's diagnostic computer. Some brands, of scanner, however, will also need the engine started.

    5

    Enter a "Scan" command on your OBD-II handheld. Device layout differs by brand, and you may need to consult your device's handbook for the exact procedure. Some devices are also preset to do this once it interfaces with the vehicle's diagnostic system.

    6

    Look at the codes, once they are displayed on your device's screen. You are looking for a few things. OBD-II codes beginning with the letter "P" are related to the engine and fuel system. For the time being, you can overlook anything that starts with a "C," "B," or "U." However, if your device is displaying those codes, you should also look into them.

    7

    Check the status of the "P" codes. Your device will tell if you they are "trouble" or "pending." Trouble codes have happened enough to trigger your check engine light, whereas pending codes have not.

    8

    Look up the codes in your device's manual. There will be a list of meanings and definitions. Most manuals only offer the generic OBD-II codes. Your vehicle manufacturer may also have supplemental codes, and the manual will not have those. You also will not find them in your vehicle's owner's manual. The easiest way to find those would be online (see Resources). Once you know what the codes mean, you can decide whether or not the vehicle needs to be driven to a repair shop.

Rabu, 16 Juni 2010

What Makes a 1997 GMC Yukon SLT 5.7L Have a Slow Start?

A slow start condition is a warning, letting you know something is wrong with your GMC Yukon. Fortunately the causes are few, and sorting through them to get to the root of the problem can be done with relative ease.

The Weather

    In the extremely frigid temperatures of the northern United States and Alaska, slow start conditions, or even no start conditions can be common. In these climates, an engine block heater, lighter viscosity oil and a battery heating pad or blanket can be good investments. These keep your car engine and battery warm, allowing normal starts in below zero temperatures.

The Battery

    A slow start may indicate that your battery or charging system is bad. Have the system load tested by a local shop or auto parts store, or if you are familiar with the process, diagnose the system yourself. A slow start also may indicate that the battery currently in the vehicle does not meet the minimum cold cranking amps (CCA) requirements of your starting system. This can become especially evident in colder weather. Check with your owners manual, a repair manual, or your local shop or dealer to determine these requirements.

The Starter

    If the starter itself is drawing too many amps, it may need replacement. This can be tested at a local shop or auto parts store, with the starter still installed in the vehicle. The starter can be removed and tested off the vehicle as well.

Selasa, 15 Juni 2010

F-250 Super Duty Brake Problems

F-250 Super Duty Brake Problems

The Ford F-250 Super Duty pickup truck has had several recalls in recent years but none of those recalls deals with the brake problems that some owners have reported. The 2008 F-250 does have 77 published technical service bulletins attached to it and one of those bulletins cites possible brake problems.

Brake Binding

    One complaint recorded on Carcomplaints.com states that the brakes begin to bind and pull to one side when the brakes are engaged. This is attributed to an overheated caliper but no reason is given for this problem. When a brake caliper overheats, it remains in the open position, causing the brake pads to constantly rub against the rotor, creating more heat and wear. This causes the F-250 to pull to the side because the pads are partially engaged at all times. The F-250 owner would have to take the truck into the dealership to have this brake problem corrected.

Brake Pedal Travel

    Edmunds.com published a technical service bulletin issued by the manufacturer that addresses excessive brake pedal travel on the F-250. This could be attributed to a master cylinder malfunction. Excessive pedal travel creates less pressure on the brake pads, preventing the truck from stopping at the normal distance. The bulletin recommends that the mechanic perform a bypass test and pinpoint test on the master cylinder to determine what is causing this symptom. Once this brake problem is detected in the F-250, the owner should take the truck into the dealership to have this test conducted on the master cylinder.

Brake Bite

    A minimum of one report of brakes biting on the F-250 is recorded by Carcomplaints.com. Brake biting is when the brakes engage quicker than expected, causing the F-250 to brake quicker than intended. This creates a hazard for the vehicles on the road behind the F-250. No specific reason has been given for this brake problem in the Super Duty but the report explains that the problem may stem from a defective the inner emergency brake cable. When this cable is not working properly, it causes the F-250 brakes to be engaged during operation of the truck. An owner who experiences this problem should take the truck immediately to a dealership for repairs.

How to Test Injector Wiring

How to Test Injector Wiring

Fuel injectors operate though the brief charging of a solenoid and subsequent opening of a valve. The opened valve allows pressurized fuel to be pushed through the fuel injector nozzle into a fine spray. The solenoid is engaged when a 12-volt current is provided by the electronic fuel injection system. The electrical connection to the fuel injector may be hampered by shorts in the wiring, inadequate voltage at the injector plug, or incorrect resistance in the fuel injector.

Instructions

Electrical Short Testing

    1

    Disconnect all the fuel injector electronic plugs on the engine.

    2

    Set a multimeter to "volts." Connect the multimeter's red lead to one of the disconnected plugs. Connect the black multimeter lead to the vehicle battery's positive terminal.

    3

    Have an assistant start the engine. The engine rotation will charge the fuel injector electronics plug. As the engine turns, the voltage on the multimeter should alternate between 12 volts and 0 volts. Keep the multimeter attached to the plug.

    4

    Connect one of the other fuel injector plugs to the associated fuel injector. Turn over the engine and recheck the voltage on multimeter. Continue attaching more plugs and retesting until all plugs are attached or until the multimeter fails to display a 12 volt to 0 volt alternation.

    5

    Replace the injector associated with the plug which, when connected, resulted in the multimeter test failure. A shorted fuel injector will prevent electricity from activating the solenoid in the other plugs.

Voltage Testing

    6

    Turn the ignition key to the "On" position. You do not need to start the engine for this test.

    7

    Disconnect the electronics plug wire from the fuel injector.

    8

    Turn the multimeter to "volts." Insert the black and red multimeter leads onto each side of the fuel injector electronics plug. Because you are testing the current it is not necessary to have a specific lead on a specific side of the plug.

    9

    Read the multimeter. The voltage should read approximately 12 volts.

    10

    Replace the wiring for any single wire set which fails the 12-volt test. Be sure to test all the wires before replacing any single set. Mass failures may indicate a failure in the electronic fuel injection relay or the engine control module.

Fuel Injector Resistance Testing

    11

    Turn the multimeter to "Ohms."

    12

    Place the multimeter leads into the fuel injector plug terminal. It is not necessary to have the black or red leads on a specific side of the plug terminal.

    13

    Read the Ohms, or resistance, produced by the fuel injector. Note the value or write it down.

    14

    Test all the fuel injector Ohm readings. Compare the value of each reading to the other values. Operational fuel injectors will have the same, or very similar, Ohm values. A failed injector will have too little or too much resistance and the Ohm value will be widely different than the other readings.

    15

    Replace the injector if the Ohm value is significantly different than other injectors. Failed injectors may still fire, leading you to believe the problem is in the wiring.

Senin, 14 Juni 2010

What Causes an Alternator Not to Charge?

What Causes an Alternator Not to Charge?

Your vehicle may be experiencing alternator problems if the battery is constantly dying; but when you have the battery checked for problems, it maintains a consistent charge. The alternator is the part of your car responsible for maintaining the battery's charge. If your battery is not recharged by the alternator while the car is driving, the battery will eventually run out of power, and your car will stop working. There are several different problems that can cause your alternator to stop working.

Pulley and Belt

    Your car's alternator charges the battery by generating power with a pulley and belt system. If the belt that controls that system snaps, stretches out or breaks, the alternator will stop working, and the battery will not charge. The same thing will happen if the pulley is somehow damaged, displaced or for whatever reason malfunctions and will no longer turn.

Wiring

    The alternator is powered by several different wiring mechanisms. If a wire is not attached properly, becomes detached or is inadvertently cut, the alternator will not have any power. If the alternator is not getting any power, it cannot turn the pulley and belt mechanism that charges the battery, and the battery will not charge.

Fuses

    According to EconoFix.com, some vehicles have a specific fuse for the alternator. If this fuse blows, either from age or a power surge in the vehicle, the alternator will not work until it is replaced. Check your vehicle's fuse box diagram to determine if your vehicle has a fuse for the alternator.

Computer Problems

    In many newer model cars, specifically those manufactured since the year 2000, the alternator is controlled by the car's computer. If your car's computer is not functioning properly or has system problems, it may cause the alternator not to charge.

Minggu, 13 Juni 2010

My Nissan 370Z Has Overheating Problems

The Nissan 370Z, a compact sports car available with a V6 engine, was introduced in 2008. Although the 370Z was the recipient of the Consumers Digest Best Buy Award, it is not exempt from mechanical issues. In particular, the 370Z suffers from overheating due to engine problems.

Problem

    Nissan technical service bulletins (TSBs) indicate that the 2009 and 2010 370Z models suffer from overheating due to engine oil leakage. An engine low on oil is likely to overheat because it cannot properly lubricate and cool the engine's components. TSBs report that engine oil leakage is often accompanied by "unusual" engine noise.

Causes

    Low engine oil can be caused by a variety of things, including inaccurate gauges, poor oil quality, a worn-out oil filter or a faulty oil pump. Each of these problems should be indicated by a "low engine oil" warning light.

Solution

    Prior to making any repairs, you or a professional should add quality engine oil to your vehicle and change the oil filter. If oil pressure remains low and overheating persists, the oil pump may require replacement. If the oil pump is not the culprit, the engine may require an overhaul.

What Are the Causes of Undercarriage Rust?

What Are the Causes of Undercarriage Rust?

Other than car accidents, rust is probably the worst thing to happen to your car or truck. Rust causes the metal parts of your vehicle to slowly disintegrate, which can lead to structural failures, leaks and a generally unsightly appearance. Rust has several different potential causes, and severe cases of rust are often caused by a combination of the different contributing causes.

Moisture

    One of the primary causes of rust is moisture. Rust forms when metal corrodes following extended exposure to moisture combined with oxygen or dirt, especially if the moisture is trapped under the dirt on the undercarriage of your car, such as can happen when traveling down a wet dirt road. This is why vehicles kept in humid or rainy climates tend to rust more quickly than those in dry areas.

Dirt

    Dirt and debris that become stuck to the undercarriage of your car contribute to rust build up by trapping moisture underneath the car. Dirt and debris can also scratch away any type of rust preventative that may have been applied to your vehicle.

Salt

    Salt is another substance that will accelerate rust development on your car's undercarriage. Salt is typically put on roadways in the winter in snowy climates to improve road traction, but the downside is that salt gets churned up by the tires and into your vehicle's undercarriage all winter long. Salt's corrosive properties cause rust to develop more quickly, so it is important to wash your car's undercarriage frequently during winter months. This is also true if you live in an ocean-side area, because salt air has the same -- though less extreme -- rusting tendency as winter road salt.

Treating and Preventing Rust Damage

    The best way to minimize rust damage is to take steps to prevent rust before it ever forms. Now that you know the causes of rust, you can make sure to store your car in a warm, dry location and wash it regularly. You can wash the undercarriage by either driving it through an automatic car wash that features an undercarriage washing feature or you can place a lawn sprinkler under the car and turn it on to allow it to rinse out the dirt. You can also have the underside of your car treated with a commercial rust preventative product. Remember, the key to preventing rust damage is to pay attention to your vehicle and take care of it properly.

Ford Contour Diagnostic Trouble Code 1131

Ford's Contour, like all vehicles produced since 1996, utilized OnBoard Diagnostics, Series II protocol. In the OBD-II coding system, a "1" in the first place indicates a Ford-specific code, while a "0" would have indicated a general emissions code. Code P1131 indicates a "lean" or "fuel-deficient" condition on bank number one. With the four- cylinder engine, bank one is the only bank; on the V-6, bank one is on the passenger-side of the engine. A lean condition could indicate a number of single faults or it could be a symptom of another fault.

Instructions

    1

    Take a look at other codes that might accompany P1131. Often times, a lean or rich condition is the result of some kind of failure in the emissions sensor system. This is particularly true if you've experienced some kind of sensor failure further upstream; a failure in any of the air or fuel-pressure monitoring sensors will cause a lean condition, which the computer's feedback circuits will recognize and trigger a code in response.

    2

    Check for vacuum leaks and leaks in the air system between the airbox and the engine. Any kind of air intrusion after the airbox will "falsify" the air reading, introducing more than the computer thinks is present. Spray around the vacuum fittings and air tube fittings with a short -- one or two-second -- burst of brake cleaner or ether starting fluid to check for vacuum leaks. If the engine rpm rises after you spray a fitting, then you've found your air or vacuum leak.

    3

    Make sure that the wiring connector on the mass airflow sensor -- located near the airbox -- is connected tightly and that the terminals are free of corrosion. If they are, disconnect the MAF sensor harness and take the car for a ride around the block. If it runs better than before and the lean code goes away, the MAF sensor is either bad or dirty. Remove the MAF sensor, spray the sensor element on the end with a dedicated MAF sensor cleaner, reinstall and reconnect the harness. If the problem persists, the MAF sensor should be replaced.

    4

    Look for Schrader valve on the top of the fuel line feeding the rail that connects to your fuel injectors. The Schrader valve will allow you to test the fuel pressure with the car running. Connect a diagnostic fuel pressure gauge to the Schrader valve; you should have about 45 psi of pressure at idle. Quickly open the throttle to rev the engine up. Pressure should remain fairly steady. If the pressure decreases, you may have a bad fuel pump, fuel filter or pressure regulator.

    5

    Disconnect the vacuum line from the pressure regulator, located on the end of the fuel rail, and plug the line with a screw or nail. Rev the engine again, gently. If it does almost exactly the same thing, then you've likely got a bad pressure regulator. If fuel pressure falls off very quickly, then you may have a bad pump or clogged filter. If fuel pressure remains steady under all conditions, you may have a bad or clogged fuel injector.

Sabtu, 12 Juni 2010

How to Check a Timing Chain on a Car

The timing chain is the part of an engine that controls the timing of engine valves. It uses teeth to link the crankshaft to the camshaft, transferring rotation from the former to the latter. When the crankshaft completes a revolution, the valves open or close. Typically, the valves will open and close once per every other revolution. Most modern vehicles use timing belts rather than timing chains, although they serve the same function. Because chains wear out over time, becoming unable to properly control valve timing, it is important to run an occasional check to ensure performance and safety.

Instructions

    1

    Open the vehicle's hood and inspect the engine block. Identify the timing marks on the tab just above the harmonic balancer (crankshaft damper pulley) of the block. The balancer is the circular-shaped device connected to the crankshaft, which functions as the pulley system.

    2

    Pull off the distributor cap (located at the rear of the engine) and observe the rotor position. Turn the engine counterclockwise until the timing mark of the balancer aligns with the top dead center mark of the timing tab.

    3

    Place the degree wheel on the harmonic balancer or clean the timing mark on the balancer and mark it with a piece of chalk. Turn the crankshaft pulley slowly in a clockwise direction. Watch the distributor and stop turning once the rotor begins moving. Mark the balancer position with chalk or observe the degree wheel.

    4

    Slowly turn the crankshaft counterclockwise. As soon as the distributor begins to rotate, stop turning and either mark the crankshaft position again or note the degree wheel.

    5

    Measure the number of degrees on the degree wheel that the crankshaft rotated. If you are using chalk, measure the circumference of the damper with a string. Take the reciprocal of the circumference (1 divided by that number) and multiply by 360 (the number of degrees in a circle). This gives you the degrees rotated.

    6

    Evaluate the condition of your chain. If the distributor rotated over 10 degrees during the test, it should be replaced. Three to five degrees of rotation is considered normal.

Jumat, 11 Juni 2010

Types of Traction Control

Types of Traction Control

Traction is the ability of something to stick to something else to the extent that it creates friction. This friction allows an object moving along another object to slow down. Traction is an important factor in the tires found on cars, since traction reduces sliding that occurs when driving on ice and is also necessary for braking.

Brake Traction

    Brakes slow down a car by using traction, which causes friction in the braking system. Traction results when the caliper presses against the piston, which causes the piston to press against the brake pads that add friction to the wheel, causing the wheel to slow down or stop. The stopped wheel no longer produces the kinetic energy that propels the car forward, and the tire provides traction on the road, which slows the momentum of the car.

Anti-lock Brakes

    Anti-lock brakes control traction by preventing the brakes from applying traction to the tires to the extent that the tires stop spinning. When the tires stop spinning, they stop providing traction to the road, which can cause the car to slide.

Tire Traction

    The traction on the tires allows the car to stay in one place instead of sliding when the car is parked. Improved braking and tire traction has produced cars that have better traction when slowing down and stopping on inclining and declining slopes. The traction that the tires and brakes have must be greater than the force that gravity places on the car, pulling the car down the slope. Tires have traction because they contain slots, pockets, and edges that are designed to scrape the surface, slowing down the car or holding it in place. Tire traction also plays a crucial role during acceleration. When the tires turn, they must experience traction to pull the car along the road. Cars that have no traction will spin their tires, causing the vehicle to go nowere. Traction can be controlled by getting better tires that dig into the ground more, which is especially helpful in winter conditions.

Anti-slip Regulation

    Many cars have anti-slip regulation that helps increase the traction of the vehicle by braking one or more tires and reducing the amount of fuel sent to one or more pistons. When tires slip, there are often differences in the rate at which they slip, which can cause the driver to lose steering control of the vehicle.

How to Troubleshoot a 2000 Ford Focus

How to Troubleshoot a 2000 Ford Focus

A compact car manufactured by Ford Motor Company, the Focus began production with the 2000 model year and is still in production as of 2011. According to resources such as RepairPal, TSB reports and NHTSA investigations, common issues with the 2000 Focus include the brake system, power steering pump, electrical system and suspension. In addition to performing routine maintenance on the vehicle, troubleshooting these areas is recommended.

Instructions

    1

    Examine the serpentine fan, timing belts, spark plugs, battery and tire pressure. The oil, fluid and fuel levels should also be checked.

    2

    Pay attention to the handling of the Focus while driving the vehicle. If the steering wheel shakes, it may be a sign that the front brake rotors have become warped and need to be replaced.

    3

    Check the power steering pump for leaking fluid or foam buildup. Replace the pump if these symptoms are present.

    4

    Check the front end of the Focus for slouching. This issue, along with uneven wear on the tires, indicates problems with the suspension. Replacing the struts is a possible solution.

    5

    Check the front brake pads if noise is heard while braking. Replace the pads if they show significant wear.

    6

    Take the vehicle to a qualified mechanic for an inspection of the electrical system if lights on the instrument panel are flashing intermittently.

Vibration Problems in Nissan Truck Tires

Vibration Problems in Nissan Truck Tires

Troubleshooting is the process of elimination. If you are experiencing vibration issues with your Nissan truck, one very important thing to check is the tires. Vibration problems that are caused by your tires might show up in a few ways. You can spend about 10 minutes at home and about 30 minutes at the tire shop to fix this issue.

Instructions

    1

    Test-drive your Nissan truck to determine when the vibration occurs. Notice the speed at which the vibration starts and stops or if it is constant. If you notice that the vibration occurs between 50 and 65 miles per hour, then the issue is most likely tire balance.

    2

    Run your hand over the surface of the tire tread. If you notice an up and down tread pattern and that the tire has dips all around, then the issue is with your tire. Many things can cause your tire to wear unevenly. Tire balance, shocks, tie rod ends and worn bushings can all cause vibration issues with your truck and its tires.

    3

    Take your Nissan to your local tire shop and have them pull the tire off the rim. In a few cases, tire shops have accidentally left tools in tires that can cause vibration. Have them check for looseness in the truck's front end as well as the tire balance. If your tires are severely worn, then you should have them changed. The tire shop can also check for a bent rim and rotate the tires to isolate the one causing the vibration.

How to Check a MAP Sensor in a 2000 Caravan

The MAP sensor on a 2000 Dodge Caravan checks the pressures of the inside of the van's air intake and inside the engine. If you believe that the MAP sensor is not working properly, the van's check engine comes on inside the console. To check the MAP sensor, a multimeter is needed. This checks the voltage of the meter and sees if it is running accurately.

Instructions

    1

    Turn the multimeter on and switch the setting to "AC." AC current is what the MAP sensor works on.

    2

    Touch the multimeter's black connector to the MAP sensor piece labeled "-". The MAP sensor is located on the air intake hose.

    3

    Place the multimeter's red connector to the MAP sensor piece labeled "+". If the sensor reads between zero and 4.5 volts, the MAP sensor is working properly. If the sensor is reading zero or above 4.5, it needs to be replaced.

Kamis, 10 Juni 2010

DIY Auto Troubleshooting

DIY Auto Troubleshooting

Most auto problems can be troubleshooted based on early warning signs. Learning how to identify those signs is a critical step towards finding and fixing simple problems. Get to know your car when it is in working condition, and you will be able to spot changes in your vehicle's performance.

Instructions

Auto Troubleshooting

    1

    Check the cable connections for the battery to ensure they are not loose if your car is stalling. Loose cable connections can cause vibrations while the car is driving. This can cause an electrical system surge, which causes the car to stall. Clean the battery terminal, and tighten any loose cable connections with a wrench.

    2

    Determine the level of the coolant in your car, if your car is overheating. The coolant level needs to be sufficient to transfer heat from the engine to the radiator. Add more coolant to the reservoir tank. The level of coolant should be between the hot and cold mark.

    3

    If you start the engine, and the lights and radio suddenly shut off, look for corrosion around the battery connections. Clean, and fasten all connections securely. Look for signs of bulging in the battery. If this happens, bring the car to a mechanic shop, so they can disassemble the battery.

    4

    Inspect the drive belts for cracks or other types of damages. Replace the belts, if necessary. Look for compressor clutch engagement by turning on the air conditioner to the coldest setting. Start the car, and let it idle for a few minutes. Check if the clutch is turning. If it cycles off and on with a ticking sound, it is low in refrigerant and should be refilled.

    5

    If there is a chirping sound while driving, look at the serpentine belt for a shiny appearance or cracks inside the belt groves. Replace the belt to stop the chirping sound.

How do I Read Computer Codes on a 1989 Nissan Sentra?

How do I Read Computer Codes on a 1989 Nissan Sentra?

The 1989 Nissan Sentra has an electronic control unit (ECU) to help diagnose problems with the vehicle. The ECU can display a series of flashing diodes through a viewing window that correlate to OBD codes. These computer codes signify problems with the engine and operation of the vehicle. When you check the codes, the red diode will flash and then the green diode will both flash a certain number of times. Each flash of the red diode signifies the first digit of the code, while each flash of the green diode represents the second digit of the code. A red diode flashing three times followed by the green diode flashing twice would signify the code 32, for example.

Instructions

    1

    Run the Nissan Sentra until the engine reaches a normal operating temperature, then turn the key to the off position.

    2

    Locate the ECU unit under the passenger-side kick panel.

    3

    Turn the ECU's diagnostic mode selector counterclockwise with a flat-blade screwdriver until it will no longer turn. Do not apply force; the selector should turn easily.

    4

    Turn on the engine, and let it idle.

    5

    Turn the ECU's diagnostic mode selector clockwise with the screwdriver until both diodes flash three times. After the diodes flash the third time, turn the selector counterclockwise until it will no longer turn. If the diodes flash more than three times, repeat this step.

    6

    Observe the ECU diode flashing. The red diode will flash the needed number of times, followed by the green diode. Record the code indicated.

    7

    Turn the ECU's diagnostic mode selector clockwise with the screwdriver to reset the ECU.

    8

    Compare the code displayed with the error code list to determine the code's meaning.

How to Check OBD Codes for a 1999 Chevy S10

To combat the risk of pollution associated with the operation of internal combustion engines in automobiles, On Board Diagnostics was introduced to standardize the systems used to monitor the efficiency of vehicle emissions control systems. By 1996, all new Chevrolet S-10 light trucks left the assembly plant with the new OBD II standardized diagnostic system installed in accordance with "SAE issuance J 1979." This system not only monitors emissions control and all related systems but also records pertinent information surrounding a check engine light-illuminating event. Retrieving the data stored by the engine control module via the OBD II connection port can help pinpoint the cause of a check engine light.

Instructions

Driving Cycle

    1

    Turn the ignition completely off and allow the engine to cool to ambient temperature -- below 122 degrees F.

    2

    Start the S10 and allow it to sit at idle for about three minutes with the air conditioner and rear window defroster on.

    3

    Turn off the air conditioner and rear window defroster.

    4

    Accelerate to 55 mph, using 50-percent throttle. Maintain this speed for three minutes.

    5

    Remove all pressure from the throttle pedal and allow the truck's speed to decrease to 20 mph. Do not use the brakes to aid in speed reduction. Additionally, if the truck is equipped with a manual transmission, do not disengage the clutch.

    6

    Accelerate to 55 mph again, using 75-percent throttle. Again, maintain this speed for three minutes.

    7

    Decelerate again to 20 mph without aid of the brake or disengaging the clutch. If the battery has been disconnected recently, repeat the acceleration cycle five times in order to retrieve accurate catalyst data.

Code Retrieval

    8

    Turn the ignition completely off and connect the scan tool connection plug to the S10's OBD II connection port. It is located below the dash on the left side of the steering column.

    9

    Turn the key to "ON" without starting the truck. The scan tool will become active.

    10

    Select "MIL Lamp Status" to determine if the check engine light should be illuminated. This troubleshoots a faulty check engine light indicator lamp.

    11

    Select "Stored Codes" or similar menu option on the scan tool and record the codes, if any, displayed. Compare the codes displayed to the code listing on the software included with the scan tool.