Selasa, 31 Maret 2009

2001 Infiniti Q45 Won't Go Over 40 MPH

The 2001 Infiniti Q45 is a luxury sedan from the upscale division of Japanese automaker Nissan. The car is powered by a 4.1-liter V8 engine that generates 266 horsepower and 278 foot-pounds of torque and features a four-speed automatic transmission. If you are having problems driving the vehicle above 40 miles per hour, there are several things you can do to troubleshoot the issue before taking the vehicle in for repairs.

Instructions

    1

    Check that the parking brake is not engaged. A "Brake" light warning will appear in the instrument panel if the parking brake is on. To release the brake, pull the handle on the dashboard above the parking brake pedal. The handle is to the left of the steering wheel.

    2

    Check that the overdrive is set to "ON." When the overdrive is off, a "OD/OFF" indicator light will appears in the instrument panel. If the overdrive is set to "OFF," the vehicle will not shift into the overdrive gear at higher speeds. The overdrive switch is found on the shift lever below the "Shift Lock" button.

    3

    Shift the vehicle into "D" instead of "2" or "L." When the Q45 is in drive, the transmission can shift through all the available gears as the car accelerates. The second and low gears are used for climbing and descending steep hills. These gears will prevent the transmission from shifting out of first or second gear and keep the vehicle from traveling faster than 40 miles per hour.

How do I Troubleshoot the Blower Fan on an 04 Ford Taurus?

How do I Troubleshoot the Blower Fan on an 04 Ford Taurus?

The blower fan is an intrinsic piece of the 2004 Ford Taurus vehicle's heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system. The blower fan is the HVAC element that distributes warmed or cooled air through the vehicle, keeping occupants comfortable, the driver alert and providing windshield demisting for safe visibility. Problems with the blower on an '04 Ford Taurus can include it not pushing air through fast enough, and not working at all. Problems like these can be corrected by following some troubleshooting steps.

Instructions

    1

    Increase the fan setting if the air throughput isn't powerful enough to demist the windows. Add a little heat to the mix. Use a lot of heat if you want to melt ice. Remove any debris at the base of the windshield if you continue to have problems. The incoming air vent is at the base of the windshield and air throughput will be affected if the vents are blocked.

    2

    Clear packages and coats from under the front seats if blower air doesn't reach the rear foot well of the '04 Taurus. Coats and other items can block the vents there.

    3

    Turn the fan to a high setting on the dashboard if the "Automatic" setting cuts the fan out too quickly for your purposes. The Automatic heater and fan settings calculate the blower speed and temperature for optimum cooling and heating. However, in the case of a particularly odorous cabin, you may want to override this setting to create more air pass-through.

    4

    Check the fuse block if the blower doesn't work at all. The fuse block is located in the '04 Ford Taurus' driver-side foot well. It's to the left of the steering wheel by the brake pedal. Use the index on the box to identify the location. Inspect the 40-Amp fuse in Location 8 (blower motor.) Location 8 is one of the larger fuses on the right-hand side. Replace it if the metal visible in the fuse is broken. Match it color-for-color. It will be orange or green.

    5

    Check the high-current fuses, too. The high-current fuses are in the engine compartment in the power distribution box. Use the index on the box to identify the location. Check Position 5 (cooling fan,) 9 (passenger side cooling fan) and 10 (driver cooling fan.) Replace them if they are broken. Match them color-for-color.

How to Troubleshoot the 1997 Chevrolet Lumina PCM

How to Troubleshoot the 1997 Chevrolet Lumina PCM

A 1997 Chevrolet Lumina has a computer at the heart of its second generation On-Board Diagnostic system. This computer is also called a powertrain control module, and it monitors functions within the engine and the fuel systems. When a malfunction occurs, the PCM catalogs it by generating an alpha-numeric code. Due to Environmental Protection Agency rules, these codes have universal definitions good for all OBD-II compliant vehicles. Checking the system requires a handheld scanner and looking for trouble codes dealing specifically with the PCM.

Instructions

    1

    Open your OBD-II scanner's manual and find the list of generic OBD-II codes and their definitions. Wedge a bookmark into place. Also, go online and find General Motors' additional, special OBD-II codes and their definitions. Print them out. Your device's manual will likely not contain any manufacture-specific OBD-II codes, and your Lumina's manual will not have either the generic or the General Motors codes.

    2

    Highlight all codes that describe PCM faults. Then, place the materials on your Lumina's center console for use in a later step.

    3

    Sit behind the Lumina's steering wheel and feel under the dash for a computer port. You will locate this outlet to the left of the steering wheel, next to the middle console. Fit your OBD-II scanner's cable into this port and switch the device on.

    4

    Slide your Lumina's key into the ignition cylinder and turn to "On." This will activate the car's electronic system, including the PCM. However, some OBD-II scanners may also need the car's engine running, too.

    5

    Enter a code-retrieving command, if you specific scanner is not preset to do this automatically. OBD-II scanners are all orientated slightly different, with buttons configured in different layouts. For the correct steps for entering this type of command, consult the relevant sections of your device's manual.

    6

    Look up each of the codes your scanner has reported. There are a few ways to speed this process up. For the moment, you can safely ignore any code labeled as "pending." Those problems have not occurred often enough for the OBD-II system to activate your Lumina's check engine light. Consult the research you left in the middle console. If you find codes like C0290 or P0606, then you have an issue with your Lumina's PCM. The module may need to be reset, reprogrammed, or replaced.

Senin, 30 Maret 2009

How to Test a Coil Pack on a 1998 Ford Taurus

How to Test a Coil Pack on a 1998 Ford Taurus

Ford Motor Company introduced the Taurus in 1986. The 1998 Ford Taurus was equipped with four different versions of the 3.0-liter Ford V-6 engine; a larger 3.4-liter V-8 engine was available in the 1998 Ford Taurus SHO, a high performance Taurus sub-model. The coil pack on the 1998 Taurus is responsible for delivering the correct amount of spark to the spark plug wires, and is metered by the ignition control module and coil module. The coil pack secondary coils or posts are tested in kilohms.

Instructions

    1

    Open the hood of the Taurus. Remove the negative battery cable from the battery, using a ratchet and socket to loosen the cable. Visually locate the coil packs on the driver's side upper portion of the engine. Place a piece of masking tape around each spark plug wire. Mark the spark plug wires in accordance with the numbers on the top of the coil packs. Each coil pack has two spark plugs attached, as well as two numbers stamped into the top the coil pack.

    2

    Remove the two spark plug wires from one of the coil packs. Adjust the multimeter or ohmmeter to the kilohms setting. If no kilohms setting is available, take the reading on the ohms setting. Place the positive or red end of an ohmmeter needle onto the side of the coil post marked with a "+" sign. Place the black or negative needle onto the coil post marked with a "-" sign. Make sure you have direct metal-to-metal contacts at the top of the post. Read the ohmmeter.

    3

    Measure the reading on the ohmmeter with the resistance requirements for the secondary coil. The secondary coil resistance should be between 12.8 to 13.1 ohms. If you do not have a kilohms setting, the reading from the ohms setting should be between 12,800 and 13,100 ohms. If the reading on the ohmmeter is not within these parameters, the coil pack will need to be replaced. Reinstall the two spark plug wires onto the coil pack.

    4

    Take readings from the second and third coil packs, utilizing the instructions in steps 2 and 3. Make sure you replace each spark plug wire with the matching number on the top of the coil pack. Replace coil packs as needed, if they do not fall into the specified kilohms range mentioned in Step 3. If all of your readings come out within the specifications, then the coil module itself will need to be replaced -- the coil module is the component onto which the individual coil packs are mounted.

Minggu, 29 Maret 2009

How to Troubleshoot a 2000 Jeep Cherokee

How to Troubleshoot a 2000 Jeep Cherokee

Troubleshooting your 2000 Jeep Cherokee's engine problems is a process of elimination. Begin with the most basic and obvious possible causes and move on to the more expensive and complicated. Keep an eye on your gauges for an indication of the root of your troubles. Check for low oil pressure, low voltage on your battery and overheating temperatures. Routine maintenance, such as getting your oil changed on schedule and having your transmission fluid checked, helps you avoid problems in the long run.

Instructions

    1

    Check your fuses. Depending on your model, the fuse panel is either under the driver's side dash or under the hood in an easily identifiable compartment. Pull the fuses by hand with a fuse puller to inspect them visually. This is the least expensive method, but some breaks are so small they're easily missed. Use a fuse tester by turning the car on, grounding the tester and pressing the tip to each fuse in turn. If the bulb doesn't come on, the fuse is broken.

    2

    Test your battery for sufficient power. The alternator generates power for the battery to use, and the battery stores the power while the engine is running. Turn the Cherokee's engine off and test the battery by connecting the positive wire on the volt meter to the positive post on the battery (they will both be red). Do the same for the negative terminals. The battery should read between 12.5 and 12.8.

    3

    Test your alternator for sufficient power. Turn the engine over and test the battery posts as in Step 2. This time the volt meter should read between 13.6 and 14.3.

    4

    Pull your engine's codes. When a problem occurs, a code is stored in the Cherokee's computer for your use. Turn the engine off, then turn it on and off in sequence (on, off, on, off, on). With older vehicles, this needs to be done within five seconds, but on the 2000 Cherokee that isn't necessary. Watch your "check engine" lights for the two-digit codes, indicated by flashes for the first digit, a pause and more flashes for the second digit. Look up the codes in your manual or online.

    5

    Check your fluids. Running too low on oil causes your Cherokee to overheat, and dirty oil will cause it to overheat and run raggedly. Running too low on transmission fluid causes the transmission to delay and creates hard shifting. Both can cause serious damage to your engine.

    6

    Check under the hood for obvious signs of problems. Look for wires that have come loose, belts with no tension or frayed edges. Check your battery for corrosion. Inspect your radiator for clogs, corrosion and signs of overheating.

How to Read Engine Codes for a 2001 Dodge Stratus

The engine trouble codes for a 2001 Dodge Stratus are stored in the vehicles powertrain control module. The PCM is the on-board computer responsible for controlling the engine, transmission and other vehicle systems. When the PCM detects a problem with one or more of these systems, it stores a diagnostic trouble code, or DTC, in its internal memory. An automotive scan tool is the only device that can retrieve the trouble codes from the PCMs memory.

Instructions

    1

    Shift the transmission into "Park," apply the parking brake and turn off the vehicles engine. Turn the ignition switch back to the ON position. Do not start the engine.

    2

    Locate the diagnostic data port: It is attached to the underside of the dashboard, above the pedal area, on the drivers side of the vehicle.

    3

    Connect the scan tools data cable to the vehicles diagnostic data port.

    4

    Power on the scan tool and choose PCM from the main menu. Choose Codes from the PCM menu. Select Read Current Codes from the Codes menu.

    5

    Write down the codes that are displayed on the scan tools screen.

Sabtu, 28 Maret 2009

How to Test a Two-Stroke Engine's Ignition Module and Coil

The ignition coil or module for a two-stroke engine regulates the ignition power, and converts it to charging electricity for the battery system. When the module and coil begin to fail, it's typically because the units have been burned out. The result will be an engine that performs badly, if it starts at all. Testing such units involves using a few electrical tools to gauge if the part still works, since most modules and coils are sealed with no serviceable parts.

Instructions

    1

    Disconnect the spark plug cap from the spark plug. Carefully remove the plug wire to the ignition coil from its hooks that keep it in place on the engine. Pull the plug wire out of the coil where it inserts: It's typically just pushed-in onto a spike in the coil.

    2

    Use a screwdriver to disconnect the coil unit from its harness, or bracket on the engine. Put the securing screws aside. Carefully pull the coil off the bracket, and then carefully disconnect the engine and vehicle wires from the coil itself.

    3

    Attach the ends of a multimeter to the coil connections for input and to ground, testing electrical resistance in the unit. Replace the coil unit with a new one, if the reading shows as infinity or zero. This means that there is no resistance the unit is burned out.

    4

    Take the good unit, or a new coil and reconnect it to the engine bracket. Insert a new length of spark plug wire, after connecting the spark plug cap to one end. Insert the other end into the coil receptacle for the wire. Reconnect the spark plug cap to the spark plug.

Warped Rotor Problems on a 2003 Taurus

The rotors on the front of the 2003 Taurus can become warped over time or rather suddenly, depending upon driving styles and road conditions. Rotors can warp due to overheating, extremely worn pads, over-torquing of the wheel nuts and even just driving through water puddles. When brake rotors become too thin, they need to be replaced rather than turned or "trued" to make them smooth again. A full examination of your rotors will let you know if you need to replace them completely. Replacement of brake rotors is sometimes more cost-effective than turning the rotors.

Instructions

Measuring Rotors for Thickness

    1

    Loosen the front wheel lug nuts with a tire iron. Raise the front of the Taurus with a jack. Place jack stands beneath the lower subframe rails, on both sides of the engine. Lower the car onto the stands. Remove the lug nuts, then remove the front wheels from the car completely.

    2

    Measure the overall thickness of the rotor, using a tape measure. If the rotor is less than 1 inch thick, then the rotor needs to be replaced completely, rather than having the rotor turned. Turning the rotor can remove more than 1/16 inch of material from your rotor, and the minimum thickness is 15/16 inches.

    3

    Place a brake disc micrometer around the rotor, and measure the thickness in the grooves on the rotor. If the measurement of the rotors is less than 1 inch inside the grooves or pits in the rotor, then the rotor needs to be replaced rather than turned.

Replacing Front Rotors and Brake Pads

    4

    Loosen the front wheel lug nuts. Raise the car on a jack. Place jack stands beneath the front sub-frame. Remove the wheel lug nuts, then remove the wheels completely.

    5

    Remove the caliper mounting bolts with a ratchet and socket, or use a Torx socket. Remove the caliper from the brake assembly, using a pry bar if needed. Hang the caliper from the front coil spring with a metal clothes hanger. Do not let the caliper hang freely from the rubber hose to which it attaches.

    6

    Remove caliper-mounting bracket bolts from the rear of the steering knuckle, with a ratchet and socket. Remove the bracket and the old brake pads from the brake assembly. Remove the old brake rotor from the front wheel hub by hand. Use a hammer to lightly tap the rotor outward if needed for removal.

    7

    Install a new brake rotor onto the wheel hub. Turn a single lug nut onto one of the wheel studs, to hold the rotor in place. Install the caliper-mounting bracket and tighten the mounting bolts between 65 and 87 foot-pounds, with a 1/2-inch drive torque wrench and socket.

    8

    Open the bleeder screw on the hanging caliper. If the bleeder looks rusted at all, spray rust-penetrating aerosol onto the screw. Let the rust penetrant stand for at least 10 to 15 minutes prior to opening the bleeder. Use an open-end wrench to open the bleeder counterclockwise. Insert an old brake pad against the caliper piston on the inside of the caliper. Compress the piston using a large set of channel locks or locking pliers. Squeeze the old brake pad against the piston to compress the piston completely into the caliper.

    9

    Hold the piston in with one hand on the channel locks. Tighten the bleeder screw snug with your other hand. Do not release the caliper piston prior to closing the bleeder, or you will cause air to enter the brake system.

    10

    Install new brake pads onto the caliper bracket. Apply a thin coat of caliper grease onto the backing plates on the new brake pads. Remove the caliper slides from the caliper bracket by hand. Thoroughly grease the caliper slide tubes with caliper grease, then reinsert them into the bracket. Install the compressed caliper back onto the brake assembly, and tighten the mounting bolts to 26 foot-pounds with your torque wrench and socket. Remove the single lug nut from the wheel stud by hand.

    11

    Repeat steps 2 through 7 to complete the rotor and pad replacement on the second side of the Taurus. Place the wheels back onto the car, and tighten the lug nuts snug with a tire iron. Raise the Taurus off the jack stands, then remove the stands from beneath the car. Lower the car to the ground, and tighten the lug nuts to 100 foot-pounds with a torque wrench and wheel nut socket.

    12

    Enter the driver's seat of the car. Press the brake pedal down slowly, then release the pedal. Repeat this process several times, until the pedal is stiff. If the pedal does not become harder to depress after five pumps, stop pumping the pedal and bleed the front calipers.

Jumat, 27 Maret 2009

What is a Camshaft Sensor on a Grand Prix?

What is a Camshaft Sensor on a Grand Prix?

The camshaft position sensor on a Pontiac Grand Prix is a digital sensor that creates an on and off pulse that tells the engine computer where the valve train is positioned relative to the crankshaft of the engine. The computer decides when the fuel injectors should fire based on this information.

How it Works

    A magnet is mounted on the outer part of a ring attached to the engine camshaft. The camshaft position sensor is near that ring. As the magnet approaches the sensor in its rotation, it produces electric current, or a pulse. The speed and timing of these pulses determines valve train position and speed.

Location

    The camshaft position sensor mountson the front of the engine, just above the crankshaft pulley. It is also to the left lower side of the serpentine belt idler pulley. The sensor typically has two wires leading from it.

Removal

    The camshaft position sensor is held in by one bolt. Remove that bolt, and disconnect the electrical plug to remove the sensor from the engine.

Kamis, 26 Maret 2009

How to Troubleshoot a 2001 Jeep Cherokee Charging System

The charging system in your 2001 Jeep Cherokee not only charges the battery but also provides the electrical supply to the vehicle when the engine is running. The charging system consists of the battery, alternator and electrical wiring. Troubleshooting the charging system when a failure occurs is a matter of testing each component in a process of elimination until the problem is found. The average home mechanic can complete this project in just a few minutes.

Instructions

    1

    Turn off all electrical accessories, including the lights, blower motor and radio. Turn off the engine. Turn on the headlights for 30 seconds and then off again to remove any surface charge that may cause false readings.

    2

    Set the digital volt ohm meter to d/c volts and touch the probe ends of the meter's test leads to the battery terminals. The red lead goes to the positive battery terminal and the black lead goes to the negative terminal. If the voltage indicated by the meter is below 12.5 volts, charge the battery before continuing testing. The 2001 Jeep charging system will shut down if the battery is discharged to prevent battery explosion caused by hydrogen gas generated by excessive discharge rates.

    3

    Turn on the high-beam headlights and touch the meter leads to the battery terminals. If the voltage drops below 12 volts after it has been properly charged, the battery is defective and should be replaced. Turn off the headlights.

    4

    Start the engine. Touch the probe ends of the meter leads to the battery terminals as before and observe the reading on the meter. A normal charging system will charge the battery at 13.5 to 14 volts with the engine running. If the battery voltage is in this range with the engine running, the system is functioning properly.

    5

    Attach the battery terminal clip on the automotive test light to the negative battery terminal. Touch the probe end of the test light to the charging stud that the large cable bolts to on the back of the alternator. If the light fails to illuminate, the cable from the under-hood fuse block to the alternator may have a bad connection or the "Charge" fuse in the under-hood fuse block may be defective.

    6

    Replace the alternator if the battery voltage with the engine off is 12.5 volts or higher and the test light illuminates when touching the charging stud.

Rabu, 25 Maret 2009

How to Troubleshoot the Fuel System in a 2002 Pontiac Sunfire

How to Troubleshoot the Fuel System in a 2002 Pontiac Sunfire

The 2002 Pontiac Sunfire features a second generation On-Board Diagnostic system covering not only emissions and the engine, but the fuel system as well. The three are related and are components within the Sunfire's powertrain. Troubleshooting the fuel system by hand can be both complicated and time consuming, especially if you do not know the exact problem you are looking for. The Sunfire's OBD-II system can give you direction, by providing you with a record of known faults and malfunctions.

Instructions

Instructions

    1

    Locate the Pontiac Sunfire's Data Link Connection beneath the steering column. It will be uncovered and easy to access. This outlet provides access to the Sunfire's powertrain control module as well as to other diagnostic systems. Connect your OBD-II handheld to this outlet and switch your device on.

    2

    Slide your ignition key into the Sunfire's starter. Turn it to the on position. The electrical system will activate as a result. Depending on brand and part number, some OBD-II devices may also need you to run the Sunfire's engine. If you own such a device, start the Sunfire's engine.

    3

    Enter in a retrieval command on your OBD-II handheld; the button layout and general device configuration differs by brand. You will need to consult your specific device's user's manual for exact instructions.

    4

    Read through all the codes your handheld retrieved. If any code starts with a letter other than "P," you can temporarily ignore it. Also, the OBD-II system will flag malfunctions differently. Seldom problems are listed as "pending," while frequent faults and malfunctions are classified as "trouble." Always troubleshoot the "pending" codes last.

    5

    Look up coding definitions for each code listed as "trouble." The OBD-II system operates on two separate set of codes. One is generic and widely used by all vehicles adhering to the OBD-II system. These will often be listed, along with definitions, in your handheld's manual. Pontiac, as part of General Motors, also uses a supplemental set. GM's codes will not be in your device's manual, and they will not be in the Sunfire's manual either. To find these you will need to log on to the Internet; two resources are listed at the end of this article.

    6

    Write down the codes that deal with the fuel system. For example, codes P0001 through P0004 coincide with the Sunfire's Fuel Volume Regulator Control Circuit; P0005 through P0008 explain the fuel shut off valve. Investigate not only the circuit or sensor specified by the ODB-II coding definition, but look around the system as a whole.

How to Retrieve DTC Codes on a 1997 Dodge Truck

Investing in a diagnostic scanner can save you money during the ownership of a Dodge truck and well beyond. While some automotive parts stores and garages may let you use their diagnostic hardware for free, many charge a fee. Some mechanics will even itemize "OBD-II diagnostics" as part of a repair bill.

Instructions

    1

    Open the truck's driver's side door and locate the on-board diagnostic (OBD) outlet beneath the dash. This outlet is usually black.

    2

    Insert the OBD-II scanner's plug into diagnostic outlet. Be firm, but do not jam it in--doing so can damage the plug or the outlet.

    3

    Place the Dodge's keys into the ignition and turn the truck on.

    4

    Watch the scanner's screen. Once the scanner and the Dodge's diagnostic system connect with each other, the trouble code will appear on the scanner's screen.

    5

    Write down the trouble code. Turn both the Dodge and the scanner off.

    6

    Look up the trouble code by performing an Internet search. You should be able to find a definition for the code on the first page of search results.

Problems With an Envoy 4WD ECU

Problems With an Envoy 4WD ECU

The GMC Envoy four-wheel-drive (4WD) has reports and technical service bulletins (TSB) about problems with the electronic control unit (ECU). The ECU controls the timing of the engine, the fuel-injection system and the idle control, and controls the power that goes to the fuel injectors as well as to many other engine components. These ECU issues can create multiple symptoms, or just one symptom, which will affect the efficiency of the Envoy engine.

Corrosion Problem

    The Envoy 4WD has a TSB published from the manufacturer about corrosion problems on the ECU causing fault lights to illuminate when there are no problems. The debris and chemicals from the road are contaminating the ECU and causing corrosion to build up on the control unit. This corrosion problem with the ECU causes fault lights or warning lights on the instrument panel to illuminate incorrectly, which misinforms the Envoy operator that there is a problem. Warning lights such as those pertaining to electrical concerns and instrument panel gauges, however, become inoperative because of this ECU problem on the Envoy.

Loss of Engine Power

    One TSB published on the Envoy 4WD states that there is a problem with the engine losing power. The ECU is not sending the proper signals to the power control or the fuel injectors, causing the engine to lose power during normal driving conditions. The Envoy engine will begin to stall or hesitate during acceleration. No specific reason is given for this ECU problem, with the exception of a programming problem with the control unit. The Envoy owner needs to take the SUV into the dealership and have the ECU reprogrammed in order to ensure that the signals sent to the power control or the fuel injectors are activated.

Fuel Injectors Clogged

    The ECU on the Envoy 4WD controls the fuel injectors and the times when the injectors are fired in order for the engine to run efficiently, according to one of the TSBs published on the GMC vehicle. But the fuel injectors can get clogged from excessive debris coming through the fuel filter, and the ECU will not recognize that the fuel injectors have a problem. The Envoy will begin to take a long time to start, idle speed will be reduced and not be controlled by the ECU, and the engine will begin to misfire when the ECU is not controlling everything properly -- not to mention the injectors being clogged. If this ECU problem continues and the Envoy is driven with clogged fuel injectors, the Envoy engine will begin to overheat and then fail. Once these symptoms develop, the fuel injectors need to be cleaned and the ECU needs to be reprogrammed by the dealership.

Selasa, 24 Maret 2009

How Does the Ford EEC-IV System Work?

How Does the Ford EEC-IV System Work?

Ford's fourth version of Electronic Engine Control (EEC-IV) is an engine diagnostic system. The vehicle uses a computer to monitor the engine and record malfunctions as they present themselves. A vehicle's active trouble codes can be retrieved through a self-testing procedure.

OBD-I versus OBD-II

    Ford's EEC-IV system is part of the first wave of on-board diagnostics. OBD-I is a catch-all term for manufacturer-specific diagnostic systems used for model year 1995 and earlier. Vehicles made in 1996 and later are subject to the Environmental Protection Agency's rules for vehicle diagnostics. As a result, Ford's EEC-IV procedures will not work on Ford vehicles made after 1996.

How to Access EEC-IV Codes

    Pre-1996 Fords contain components called a Self-Test Outlet and a Self-Test Input. They are in the rear of the engine compartment, but exactly where depends on the model and year. To initiate a self test, the Ford needs to warmed to its operational temperature. The STO's grounding slot needs to be connected to the STI's single slot with jumper wire. Then the electrical system needs to be switched on.

Reading EEC-IV Flash Codes

    The Ford will display mechanical faults through its check engine light. Codes will consist of long and short flashes. For instance, EEC-IV code 17 will be seen as one long flash followed by seven shorter ones. EEC-IV codes are generally not in a Ford's owner's manual. They can be found online, or in a Haynes or Chilton repair handbook.

How to Troubleshoot an Instrument Panel Light That Stays On

How to Troubleshoot an Instrument Panel Light That Stays On

The malfunction indicator lights on your vehicle's dashboard are programmed to appear when the vehicle's electronic control module (ECM) senses a problem or issue in any of the mechanical or electronic components. The malfunction lights will stay continuously lit until the problem is repaired and the error code has been manually erased from the electronic control module's memory. Malfunction lights include the check engine light, check transmission light, oil light, battery light and other miscellaneous, manufacturer-installed lights.

Instructions

    1

    Attach an OBD II error code reader to the electronic control module under your vehicle's dashboard and scan the ECM for error codes. The standard OBD II code readers will work on any vehicle sold in the United States since 1996. You can either purchase a code reader or go to a location that offers error code scanning and diagnosis. Most auto-parts stores provide this service free of charge.

    2

    Write down the error codes that the OBD II scanner reported. Determine the meaning of these codes on your make and model vehicle. There are lists of error codes and their meanings available from various sources (see Resources). If you have a parts store or mechanic scan your vehicle, they will be able to decode the codes for you.

    3

    Correct all problems with the vehicle that were reported by the codes. This means either performing the repairs yourself or taking the vehicle to a mechanic to have the vehicle repaired. You will have to correct the problems that are causing the malfunction indicator light to come on before you can turn the light off.

    4

    Re-scan your ECM after you have repaired the problems. Manually delete each error code from the vehicle's ECM using the OBD II code reader. Deleting the error codes with a code reader is the only way to turn off the error lights in a newer-model vehicle. In vehicles manufactured prior to 1996, you may be able turn off the lights by disconnecting the battery and allowing it to sit for several minutes before reconnecting it. This will reset the vehicle's computer and reset the error lights with it.

How to Check for Electricity Leakage

How to Check for Electricity Leakage

In the morning, you get behind the wheel, turn the ignition key to fire up your engine and all you get is a moaning sound or no sound at all. Electricity leakage or battery drain can slowly discharge the battery in your vehicle after sitting in your driveway for a few hours. A door that fails to close tightly, an electrical short or a bad connection may keep a light bulb or an accessory on and gradually consume battery power. Find the problem and restore the electrical system in your vehicle with a few tests you can perform at home.

Instructions

    1

    Pop your vehicle's hood open and disconnect the ground (black) battery cable with a wrench.

    2

    Get your digital ammeter out of the toolbox. Connect the ammeter black probe to the battery post you just disconnected and the red probe to the terminal of the battery cable.

    3

    Remove the light bulb from under the hood, if your vehicle is equipped with it. Close the trunk and the car doors as well. Make sure all accessories are off.

    4

    Turn on your ammeter. The readout should register 0 amps, or about 10 mA (milliamps). If the readout registers above this figure, it is possible you have an abnormal drain in the electrical system.

    5

    Ask an assistant to remove the light bulb from the trunk, close the trunk and then replace the light bulb. Do the same with the glove box light bulb. If removing one of these light bulbs causes the ammeter to read zero, that light bulb is staying on after closing the trunk lid or glove box. Make sure the trunk or glove box is closing tight by pushing on the light bulb switch, and then check the light bulb socket for a short.

    6

    Close the trunk and glove box tightly and make sure all accessories are turned off. Ask an assistant to pull a fuse from the fuse box from under the dashboard using fuse puller.

    7

    Read the display on your ammeter. If the meter readout remains the same, ask your assistant to replace the fuse and pull another fuse.

    8

    Repeat until the readout in your meter goes to 0 when your assistant pulls one of the fuses. The circuit that fuse protects is the source of the electrical leakage.

    9

    Check the wiring diagram for that circuit in the vehicle service manual for your particular vehicle make and model. This diagram will tell you the components and connections on this circuit so that you can perform pinpoint tests to locate the short circuit or bad connection causing the leak in the circuit. Or, if you prefer, take your vehicle to an automotive electrical shop and have them fix the problem.

    10

    Disconnect the electrical wires from the starter solenoid -- the small cylinder on top of the starter motor -- if none of the fuses that you removed from the fuse boxed caused your ammeter to read 0. If disconnecting the starter solenoid causes the ammeter to go to 0 amps, you have an electrical short in the solenoid or the wires connecting to the solenoid.

1989 Toyota Celica Troubleshooting

1989 Toyota Celica Troubleshooting

The 1989 Toyota Celica has a four-cylinder, two-liter engine. The small passenger car was manufactured as a five-speed manual and a four-speed automatic. It has two doors and seating for four people. The small engine is not complex and troubleshooting requires basic observations and regular monitoring of the vehicle performance. The Celica is an economy vehicle and with proper maintenance many of the cars will exceed 200,000 miles without any major mechanical breakdowns.

Instructions

    1

    Test the Celica for power by operating the radio and dash lights. Do not rely on the headlights, as the Celica is known for having dim headlights. Use a trickle charger to charge the battery and start the car. If the battery continues to lose power, replace it with a new one.

    2

    Use a voltage meter to test the alternator if the car experiences frequent power loss. Replace the alternator if it is not providing a steady current of electricity. A bad alternator will repeatedly drain the battery, eventually ruining it.

    3

    Test the starter if the battery and alternator are good but the engine will not crank. Remove the two starter bolts with a socket wrench and have the unit tested at an auto parts store or mechanic shop. Hit the unit with a hammer as an emergency solution for starting the vehicle.

    4

    Drive the vehicle to test the engine. Hit the gas and monitor the power. If the engine sputters and does not accelerate quickly, the fuel pump is weak and must be replaced. Hit the brake and listen for grinding. Also feel for pulsating and vibrations. Have the brakes replaced if they are worn.

    5

    Monitor the transmission shifting as you drive. If the transmission skips gears, throttles forward or hesitates, it must be serviced. The transmission in the Celica will last for well over 100,000 miles if properly maintained.

Senin, 23 Maret 2009

What Happens to a Car If Bad Gas Is Put in It?

What Happens to a Car If Bad Gas Is Put in It?

Bad gas can cause immediate performance problems and, in some cases, permanent damage to your engine. It may cause your car not to start. What it does to your car depends on what is wrong with the gas.

Dirty Gas

    Gas containing debris, such as dirt or rust, will clog your fuel filter. It also can damage your fuel pump. When the fuel filter gets dirty, fuel delivery is limited or blocked. The car will act like it is out of gas or running out of gas.

Old Gas

    Gasoline that sits too long will go bad, lose its volatility. It eventually turns into a varnish that will coat your gas tank, fuel lines and carburetor or fuel injectors. If you run the engine after this happens it can cause serious engine damage. The varnish in your gas tank can dry up and flake off creating debris in the gas.

Low Octane

    Low octane causes combustion problems that make the engine knock or ping. It can also cause the engine to keep running briefly after you shut off the ignition. Check your owner's manual for the correct octane rating for your car.

Overheating Exhaust & Engine

Overheating Exhaust & Engine

When your exhaust and engine overheat, your power train records a diagnostic code. A technician attaches a scanner to the wiring system of your power train to read the codes. A clogged coolant system or sensor may be the problem.

Temperature Light

    If the engine overheats, check the coolant level and radiator hoses for leaks. The problem could be a radiator hose, thermostat, a failed water pump or a buildup of sludge in the cooling system. A leaky head gasket or cracks in a cylinder or the engine block may also be the problem.

Engine Coolant Sensor

    The engine coolant sensor is a master sensor that monitors the temperature of the engine. This sensor can affect the fuel, ignition, emissions and drive train function. If your coolant is not the proper temperature, your transmission will stick in a lower gear. An inoperative blower motor and fan will cause your compressor to disengage.

Oxygen Sensor

    Air fuel sensors and oxygen sensors are in the rear of the engine near the exhaust manifold. The oxygen sensors in the exhaust manifold monitor unburned oxygen in the exhaust leaving the engine. If oxygen sensors into and out of your catalytic converter read the same amount, your catalytic converter caused the overheating.

Stalling Problems in a 2001 Isuzu Rodeo

Stalling problems aren't uncommon in computer-controlled vehicles like the Rodeo; in fact, they're so common that simple stalling could indicate practically any kind of failure in the engine or electronics. The truck's Onboard Diagnostics, Series II computer and computer port will prove your most valuable ally here, offering valuable information that can help you to track down an otherwise perplexing malfunction.

Reading the Smoke

    The color and smell of an engine's exhaust smoke can tell you a lot about what's going on internally and why it keeps stalling. A puff of black smoke accompanied by the smell of raw gasoline indicates that there's not enough air going in, there's too much fuel going in or the ignition system has malfunctioned and isn't igniting the fuel. While the absence of smoke or smell doesn't necessarily tell you anything -- particularly since you might not see or smell it if the car is moving -- the presence of smoke will. You might want to immediately stop and smell the exhaust pipe after stalling; any kind of raw fuel odor tells you it's one of the above problems.

Stalling at Idle

    Random stalling at idle generally indicates a real-time change in the system, meaning that something that was working has stopped working. If the truck will run when you apply throttle but dies when you let off, then odds are that a dirty throttle body or bad idle air control valve are at fault. A stuck-open or malfunctioning exhaust gas recirculation valve, leaking vacuum lines or intake tubes, a malfunctioning lock-up torque converter, an overheating ignition coil, a bad chassis ground and loose or corroded fuse and electrical connections will all cause random stalling at idle.

Stalling Under Acceleration

    Your engine experiences its greatest loads and highest sensitivity to malfunction when accelerating. When you depress the gas pedal, you open the engine's main air valve (the throttle body), flooding the engine with air and necessitating a rapid influx of fuel to keep up. If your fuel pressure is low, or if the fuel filter or injectors are dirty then the engine will end up starved of fuel. If the air filter or catalytic converter are extremely clogged, then fresh air can't get into the engine and exhaust gases can't get out. If your ignition system malfunctions, the fuel will fail to ignite and will go through the engine and out of the exhaust.

Stalling Under Deceleration

    Three things happen when you suddenly lift off the gas and hit the brake. First, the throttle body valve shuts and the engine loses almost all of its air supply. Then, the lock-up torque converter disengages and the transmission shifts down one or more gears. If your throttle body has excessive buildup or the IAC valve malfunctions, the engine will suddenly run out of air and stall. A torque converter that fails to disengage will stall the engine when the vehicle slows down, especially if the transmission fails to shift down and allow the engine rpm to remain at running speed.

Electrical Gremlins

    The sad fact is that almost any kind of sensor or computer failure will ultimately result in stalling, so there's no way to pin down exactly what sensor is malfunctioning without any further symptom data. Sudden fluctuations from throttle position, mass airflow, crank position, oxygen, manifold air pressure, knock sensors and even coolant temperature sensors can cause rough idle, misfire and stalling under certain conditions. The surest way to narrow down a sensor failure is to check the engine codes with a scanner and see what's going on.

Sabtu, 21 Maret 2009

Causes of Vibration in the Driveline

Causes of Vibration in the Driveline

Cars are complex pieces of machinery with many different interdependent systems. The suspension system itself is one prime example of interdependency; if any one component fails, the entire system stops working. Vibrations are a type of "cyclic" failure, wherein the same problem is expressed over and over again. Cyclic suspension failures always indicate that something that should be smoothly spinning isn't.

Thrown Wheel Wieght

    Very few wheels have perfect balance from the factory. Tiny imperfections in machining or casting, variations in metal density and even small dents in the wheel can cause it to go out of balance. Manufacturers and garages use machines to determine which part of the wheel is the lightest, and install soft lead weights to bring that side up to spec. Over time, these weights can fatigue and fall off, throwing the wheel back out of balance and causing vibration that may be completely absent at low speed but quite pronounced at anything over 30 mph.

Driveshaft Balance

    Driveshafts require weights to bring them back into balance, too, but these weights are usually welded on. Driveshaft imbalances are usually the result of a dent or bent shaft, which throws the mass off-center and causes vibration. This can apply to front-wheel drive cars, but generally only happens to rear-wheel, all-wheel or four-wheel drive vehicles. While not generally considered part of the suspension (it technically is since it moves with the wheels), driveshaft vibration can easily mimic the usual suspension problems.

Tire Damage

    Tires have metal reinforcing belts inside which, when they snap, will cause a weak spot in the tire's tread. These weak spots will inevitably manifest as bubbles, which cause a high spot on the tire and vibration when they touch the ground. Flat-spots are the opposite of bubbles and are usually caused by locking the brakes. Tire deformations differ from other kinds of vibration in that they will be present regardless of vehicle speed. At low speed, the bumping will be slower and longer; at high speed it will come and go rapidly.

Broken Steering Components

    Bent or worn out steering end links and steering shafts may cause vibration at speed. This condition differs from other vibrations in that the vibration is more side-to-side than up-and-down. If you experience this sort of vibration stop the car, have it towed and have it repaired immediately. This condition could also indicate that the suspension is severely out of alignment; you won't know until you get it checked.

Bad Wheel Bearings

    Worn wheel bearings will first manifest themselves with a low, intermittent grumbling or grinding, which will over time become a pronounced vibration that increases in pitch and frequency with speed. Audibly growling bearings aren't necessarily an immediate danger, but you should replace them as soon as you begin to feel vibration or hear a squealing associated with the grumble.

Kamis, 19 Maret 2009

How to Test 12 Volt Ignition Coils

How to Test 12 Volt Ignition Coils

An automobile ignition coil acts as a transformer, having a primary and secondary bundle of wires that create and send an electrical charge to the spark plugs, causing them to fire. While ignition coils will generally last for the life of a vehicle, faulty spark plugs or spark plug wires can send irregular voltage surges through the ignition coil, causing the coil to burn out. You can test a 12-volt ignition coil for effectiveness by checking the resistance of its wire windings with a multimeter.

Instructions

    1

    Disconnect your engine's main negative battery cable with a wrench.

    2

    Pull the main ignition coil wire, the one that leads to the distributor, off the coil. Disconnect the small grounding wire, attached to the side of the coil, with a wrench.

    3

    Turn on the multimeter and set it to the "ohms" function.

    4

    Insert one of the multimeter's probes into the center opening of the coil, contacting the metal terminal inside the coil. Touch the second probe of the meter to the ignition coil's grounding terminal. The meter should read 6,000 to 15,000 ohms. If it does not, the coil's secondary winding is faulty.

    5

    Remove meter's probe from the center terminal and touch it to the terminal bolt on the opposite side of the coil from the probe touching the grounding terminal. The meter should read between approximately 0.4 and 2 ohms. If it does not, the coil's primary winding is faulty.

Rabu, 18 Maret 2009

What Happens When a Car Needs a New Timing Belt?

What Happens When a Car Needs a New Timing Belt?

Timing belts first hit American shores in the 1950s. These fiber-reinforced rubber belts, while historically reliable, have destroyed more engines than probably any other internal single-component failure. Don't be too quick to blame the belt itself; leaving one in place past the recommended 100,000 to 150,000 mile change interval is inviting disaster.

Tiing Belt Basics

    There are three basic ways to link a camshaft to a crankshaft: with a chain, a set of gears or a belt. While chains are fairly sturdy and reliable, they're expensive to produce and require constant lubrication. That's a problem for many modern engines, which use a "dry" timing set external to the engine itself. While toothed belts might seem like something of a second-rate choice, they are, for the most part, a fine option as long as they're replaced at the recommended intervals.

Stretched Belts

    Belt stretch is the first step toward belt failure, and an inevitable consequence of using one. In fact, the belt typically stretches the most about 15 minutes after installation; that's why belt systems almost always use some sort of spring tensioner. After the belt stretches by a certain amount, the camshaft moves backward relative to the crankshaft. The cam timing goes off by a bit, and you'll likely see some power loss, engine vibration, misfire and a bit of black exhaust smoke with a strong odor of fuel.

Jumped Timing

    An engine is said to have "jumped timing" when the teeth on the belt come out of the grooves on the cam or crank sprockets and jump one or more teeth over to adjacent sprocket grooves. This typically happens due to a combination of belt stretch, belt wear and a weak or malfunctioning belt tensioner. Jumped timing is a far more serious thing than belt stretch, with similar but more severe symptoms involving misfire, engine vibration, power loss and exhaust smoke. How severe the symptoms are depends upon how many teeth the belt has jumped. One or two teeth and the engine may continue to run; after that, it's dead in the water.

Broken Timing Belt

    The best-case scenario is that your engine just stops running, probably following the sound of a backfire through the intake or exhaust; this is only true of certain engine types known as "non-interference" designs. A non-interference engine is one designed so the pistons can never come into contact with the valves, even with the piston at the top of its stroke and the valves fully open. Those horror stories you here about broken timing belts come from owners of "interference" engines. Should the timing belt or chain break on an interference engine, the pistons smash into the open valves and snap them off inside the cylinders. If that happens, you might as well just kiss the whole motor goodbye.

Selasa, 17 Maret 2009

How to Prevent Damage to My Engine That Ran Without Oil

How to Prevent Damage to My Engine That Ran Without Oil

Oil keeps your engine lubricated and prevents overheating. If you're low on oil or, worse yet, run your engine without any oil, you're probably in for serious problems. Running your car without oil can cause extensive damage to your engine. If you're lucky enough to not have completely ruined your engine, there are a few things you absolutely must do to prevent further damage.

Instructions

    1

    Stop driving your car. If the engine has no oil you have no business driving your car. Even a few seconds of running without oil can ruin the engine.

    2

    Add oil to your car before you turn on the engine again. The new oil will run through the engine and properly lubricate all the parts if you have to drive your car again. You shouldn't drive the car until it is inspected, though, since you likely caused extensive damage already.

    3

    Tow your car to the nearest mechanic. You may drive if absolutely necessary (see Step 2) but it's likely you've caused extensive damage to your engine by driving without any oil. Even if you add oil before your next drive, you could make the situation worse. The best course of action is to get your car towed and have a mechanic inspect the damage.

    4

    Never drive without oil in your engine again. This sounds obvious, but if you drove your car without oil you undoubtedly ignored several signals from your engine that something was very wrong. First, the engine will give off a grinding sound. This sound is caused by the engine parts actually grinding against each other due to the lack of lubrication. Second, the engine will begin to stall. Do not attempt to keep driving when your engine is quitting on you. Third, the engine temperature gauge on your dashboard will skyrocket (the friction between the moving engine parts creates significant amounts of heat). Fourth, you'll likely begin to see smoke emanating from the hood. Any of these signs means you need to stop driving immediately.

How to Troubleshoot the Headlights on My Grand-Am

How to Troubleshoot the Headlights on My Grand-Am

Grand Am headlights may not work correctly for a number of reasons, such as an old bulb or faulty wires. However, regardless of the reason why they fail to illuminate, you need to fix them quickly, so you can see while you drive during the night. If you understand how to troubleshoot your vehicle, you can get to the exact cause of your headlight problem.

Instructions

    1

    Pull up the hood of your vehicle.

    2

    Remove both clips that hold your headlight assembly in place.

    3

    Remove your assembly. This allows you to view your connector of the electrical variety. Gently pull on this component. If it emerges without an issue, insert it in the back portion of your assembly. If this does not solve your issue, you may need to change your bulb. Take out your electrical connector and entire assembly from your Grand Am.

    4

    Turn the assembly retainer of your bulb in a counterclockwise fashion and remove it.

    5

    Remove your assembly bulb from its location. Then, take out your previous light bulb and put in another one that works.

    6

    Connect your wiring harness once again to your bulb assembly Insert your bulb in your headlight assembly as well and turn it clockwise, to secure it in position. Connect your electrical connector.

    7

    Put your headlight assembly back on and relock its clips.

97 Toyota Camry Clogged Catalytic Converter Symptoms

With a 2.2-liter four-cylinder engine and a five-speed manual transmission you 1997 Camry was built to conform to either federal emissions or California emissions. If your vehicle is built to California emissions you will have a catalytic converter as part of the exhaust manifold and a second converter midstream in the exhaust piping. A clogged catalytic converter on your Camry will share the same tale tale signs as other vehicles experiencing the problem. The catalytic converter is very important to protect the environment and is required by law in most states to me emissions standards.

How it Works

    Your Camry is equipped with a three-way catalytic converter that reduces and breaks down several dangerous gases that are produced from the combustion process. The first pass through for the exhaust is through the reduction catalyst to reduce NO and NO2 gasses. The second pass is the oxidation catalyst that reduces unburned hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide. The third process in the catalyst process in the control system. The control system relates to the oxygen sensors mounted at both ends of the converter to detect and report to the computer the amount of oxygen left in the exhaust system.

Smell

    The most common and well recognized sign of a clogged catalytic converter is a distinctive smell of sulfur or rotten eggs. A natural compound created from the fuel when burned in the combustion chamber is hydrogen sulfide. Hydrogen sulfide is normally broken down into sulfur dioxide as it passes through the catalyst in the converter, but when the converter materials are worn or damaged this doesn't happen. The Hydrogen sulfide then escapes past the converter and produces a rotten egg or sulfur smell. This is normally caused from the additional sulfur from unburned fuel being burned in the converter and is one of the last signs that appear as a result of a clogged or damaged converter. If your exhaust gas smells like rotten eggs, you will need to replace the converter and diagnose the cause of such a rich fuel mixture.

Performance

    A catalytic converter is designed to allow exhaust to flow almost freely and provides very little restriction. As build up occurs inside the converter, there is more and more resistance to the exhaust flowing freely creating back pressure. The creation of back pressure makes the engine labor harder and will greatly reduce your engines performance. In your Camry this will be evident has a spurt or mild to heavy hesitation during moderate acceleration. In extreme cases the catalytic converter can prevent an engine from even running when clogged because there is no escape for any of the exhaust gases.

Visual Appearance

    Oddly enough, even though the catalytic converter functions entirely inside its shell, there are visual signs that can be seen on the outside of the case. Support you Camry in the air with jack stands and visually inspect the converter case. A warped or heat colored case will tell you that the catalytic converter is getting very hot as a result for burning fuel and the converter working harder to pass the exhaust through it. This heat can be noticed when the vehicle has been driven or running for a reasonable amount of time because the converter will begin to glow red when it gets hot enough to damage or warp the case.

Testing and Repair

    There are not a lot of ways to test for a clogged converter, but it can be done. You can drill a small hole in the exhaust before the catalytic converter to test the back pressure created from the catalytic converter. In general the back pressure from the catalytic converter at idle shouldn't exceed 1.25 psi at idle or 4 during snap acceleration. Anything above these readings indicate some blockage; the higher the back pressure the worse the blockage, respectively. You can also use an infrared temperature gauge to check the temperature before and after the catalytic converter. Extreme drops in temperature at the outlet of the converter as opposed to the inlet indicates the converter is clogged. Replacing the catalytic converter is as simple as removing the oxygen sensors and unbolting the converter from the exhaust manifold and rear muffler pipe. Replace the gaskets at both ends of the converter and tighten the mounting bolts in rotating sequence until tight to ensure the mating surfaces are flush and seal properly.

How to Tell If a Wheel Cylinder Is Bad

How to Tell If a Wheel Cylinder Is Bad

The wheel cylinders in your vehicle are an essential part of your drum brakes. Wheel cylinders work by forcing the brake shoes against the drums when you apply the brakes. If your wheel cylinders experience a problem or malfunction, you will have problems with your vehicle's brakes. If you suspect your car has malfunctioning or bad wheel cylinders, you should replace them immediately.

Instructions

    1

    Press down on your brake pedal. If your brakes feel soft or low, you may be losing brake fluid through the rear brake wheel cylinders. Check your brake cylinders if you consistently find yourself having to add brake fluid to your vehicle.

    2

    Check for brake fluid leaks or puddles under your car as leaks are one of the primary signs that your wheel cylinder has broken and is leaking brake fluid. If your car or truck has brake fluid leaking from the back brake assembly, there is a very good chance your wheel cylinder is going out.

    3

    Drive your car down the road at a very slow speed and experiment with stopping your vehicle by both quickly and slowly depressing your brake pedal. If your brakes do not seem to be working as well as they should, but are still working, your wheel cylinders may have gone bad. Your back brakes only account for around 20 percent of your vehicle's stopping power.

    4

    Take your car to your mechanic and have him inspect your brake cylinders if you suspect there is a problem. He will need to remove the back tire to check for worn piston seals, corrosion and pitting. If there is a problem with your wheel cylinders, he can replace them.

How to Troubleshoot a 2005 Chevrolet Cavalier Engine

How to Troubleshoot a 2005 Chevrolet Cavalier Engine

A 2005 Chevrolet Cavalier operates under the second generation of On-Board Diagnostics. The car's central computer monitors the engine's operation on an ongoing basis. Once a problem is detected, the computer catalogs its occurrence, assigns it a code, and classifies it as "pending." If the problem persists, its status changes to a "fault" or "trouble." The service engine light comes on as a result. Accessing these codes is good way to begin troubleshooting the Cavalier's engine. An OBD-II scanner retrieves all codes, not just the faults. This can help you to pinpoint engine problems fairly quickly.

Instructions

    1

    Look directly beneath the Cavalier's steering wheel column. Beneath the dash, you will find a 16-pin receiving outlet. This is diagnostic system's Data Link Connection.

    2

    Attach your scanner's cable to the Cavalier's Data Link Connection. Some scanners will sense the connection with the OBD-II system and turn themselves on. If you do not own that sort of scanner, press the power button on your scanner.

    3

    Start the Cavalier's engine or switch on the electrical system. Check the directions on your scanner to determine which method to use.

    4

    Enter a "Retrieve" or "Read" command, if your scanner is not programmed to automatically scan for code.

    5

    Scroll through the codes on the screen. Your scanner will differentiate between pending codes and fault codes. Always give priority to the fault codes, but be sure to make note of both.

    6

    Look up each code in the back your scanner's manual. The manual with have a list or appendix of generic OBD-II code definitions, which are standard in all OBD-II compliant vehicles. The Cavalier also uses supplemental codes used in General Motors vehicles. To find this codes, you will have to find the definition online.

    7

    Turn the Cavalier's engine and/or electrical system off. Remove the scanner's cable from the Data Link Connection.

Minggu, 15 Maret 2009

What Makes the Front End of 96 Dodge Caravan Shake?

Troubleshooting vibrations in a 1996 Dodge Caravan isn't very different than doing the same for other minivans or front-drive cars of its caliber. The Dodge's simple front-drive layout means that it will manifest symptoms similar to those of other cars, and the optional all-wheel-drive system doesn't change that much. The key to finding the source of your vibration is to focus less on where it occurs than on when it occurs.

Vibrations at Idle

    A vibration at idle, in park, can only be one of a few things. If the entire van shakes in park, then odds are best that you've either got a cylinder misfire -- indicated by a "check engine" light and engine codes P0300 through P0306 -- or a bad motor mount. The Caravan uses a transverse engine layout, so a bad motor mount will typically result in a back-and-forth vibration, as opposed to a side-to-side vibration. If you feel pulsation in the steering wheel while attempting to turn it, then you have a malfunction in the steering rack valving. Vibration in drive with your foot on the break generally indicates either a vacuum leak or a malfunction in the torque converter or converter lock-up mechanism.

Vibration Under Acceleration

    A vibration that worsens when you accelerate but is not linear in severity to speed indicates either a malfunction in the driveline -- the transaxle or CV joints -- or a misfire resulting from either excess air, not enough fuel or a malfunction in the ignition system that only manifests when it's under stress. Causes of fuel starvation include a clogged fuel filter and malfunctioning fuel pump; excess air problems may result from a vacuum leak, or a dirty or malfunctioning mass airflow sensor. Either of these will trigger a "lean condition" trouble code and "check engine" light.

Speed-Dependent Vibration

    Vibration that worsens linearly to vehicle speed usually indicates some sort of cyclical vibration: Put simply, it means that one or more of your wheels are either bouncing up-and-down or are wobbling side-to-side. Lost wheel weights will throw the tire out of balance, and a bubble in the tire tread will bounce the tire every time it impacts the road. A suspension in need of alignment, or bad control arm bushings -- rubber isolators -- will allow the wheels to wobble back-and-forth. The same is true of bent, broken or worn steering components. Bad wheel bearings will also cause a vibration that increases with speed, but will also emit a tell-tale grumble or grinding noise.

Vibration Under Deceleration

    Bad suspension alignment can manifest under braking, and worn or malfunctioning steering end links almost certainly will. This is especially true if you feel the vibration snaking its way up through the steering wheel and into your arms. Warped brake rotors may also cause front-end vibration, but you should notice a distinct pulsation in the brake pedal and likely the steering wheel. The same is true of a bad ABS modulator, which may malfunction in such a way as to cause pressure fluctuations in the brakes. If the vibration feels more like a jerking shudder than a true vibration, then you may have a problem with the transmission, torque converter or converter lock-up mechanism.

Vibration While Turning

    Alignment problems, worn bushings, bad wheel bearings and worn or broken steering components may worsen in intensity while turning one direction or the other, but will likely vibrate at other times as well. If your vibration happens only when turning, it could indicate the initial stages of these failures, but it could just as easily mean that you've got a bad outer CV joint. Broken teeth on your differential's pinion or axle gears would also cause vibration while turning, but this is pretty unlikely given the Caravan's relative lack of low-end torque.

Sabtu, 14 Maret 2009

How to Tell What Transmission I Have on an E-250

The Ford E-series van has been around since 1961 and was originally based on the Ford Falcon platform. The E-250 is a 3/4-ton van that is the mid-range van in the E-series, which is made up of the 1/2-ton E-150, 3/4-ton E-250, and 1-ton E-350. The bottom of the transmission can help you identify the true transmission that you have, as Ford stamps the transmission type on automatic transmission pans. Knowing these numbers will help you identify the transmission, making it much easier to get parts and perform maintenance. The Ford E-250 transmissions are going to be four-speed or four-speed with overdrive transmissions.

Instructions

    1

    Lift the front of the E-250, using a 2-ton jack or one with greater capacity. Place jack stands beneath the front frame or chassis rails to support the van during this project. Driving the van onto vehicle ramps to raise the front end will eliminate the need for a jack and stands.

    2

    Slide your body in position underneath the van to physically be able to access the bottom of the transmission. The transmission is mounted to the back of the engine, and has a large bell shape attached to the engine. This is called the bell housing. The transmission narrows the farther back you go until it connects to the drive shaft in the rear of the transmission. The transmission pan is centered on the bottom of the transmission, about 1 foot behind the bell housing.

    3

    Visually inspect the bottom of the transmission pan. The transmission pan is made of stamped steel, and is either going to be black or silver, depending on your year of E-250. The pan is usually about 1 1/2 inches deep and about 1 foot in diameter across the bottom of the pan. The most distinguishing part of the transmission pan is the 3-inch stamped lettering on the pan. If you cannot see the bottom of the pan clearly, use a flashlight. If there is too much dirt or grime on the bottom of the transmission, spray the pan bottom with aerosol engine degreaser and wipe the transmission pan with a rag.

    4

    Read the numbers on the bottom of the pan and write them down for future reference. You can check the numbers on the bottom of the transmission pan with your local Ford dealership in order to determine the exact type of transmission in the E-250.

    5

    Raise the front of the van with the jack and remove the jack stands to lower the van. If you used vehicle ramps, you can drive the van off of the ramps.

How to Check an Electric Fuel Pump

Most cars on the road today are equipped with an electric fuel pump. The pump physically sits inside the car's gas tank with the top of the pump sticking out to connect to the car's fuel lines. The pump pulls fuel from the gas tank and sends it to the engine so that the car can drive. Because the fuel pump is difficult to access, it is important to properly check and troubleshoot the pump before you decide that it needs to either be repaired or replaced.

Instructions

    1

    Check your car to see if it shows any symptoms that the fuel pump may have failed. One common symptom is the car stalling when you press the gas pedal to accelerate the vehicle. Another symptom to watch for is the car refusing to start at all.

    2

    Determine whether your car has the right fuel pressure level. Connect a fuel pressure gauge to the Schrader valve of your engine. The valve is on the top of the engine. It looks very similar to the air valve on a bicycle or automobile tire. Once the fuel pressure gauge is connected, turn the car on, let the engine idle and read the gauge. If you are unsure of what the proper fuel pressure range is for your vehicle, consult a local mechanic or call your local automotive dealership to ask.

    3

    Check whether the fuel pressure regulator has failed. If the fuel pressure level is low, the fuel pressure regulator may be the cause instead of the fuel pump. The regulator has a fuel line running to it near the top of the engine. Lightly squeeze the fuel line connected to the regulator with some pliers while the fuel pressure gauge is connected and the engine is idling. If the fuel pressure increases when you squeeze the fuel line, the regulator is the problem, not the fuel pump.

    4

    Listen to whether the fuel pump begins working before the car starts but after the battery is engaged. Put your ignition key into the car's ignition and turn the key until the battery is engaged. If the fuel pump is working properly, it will begin to send fuel through the fuel lines as soon as the battery is on. Be sure to perform this test in a quiet place. If you are unsure about whether you are hearing the pump turn on or not, have a second person listen for you while you sit in the car.

Jumat, 13 Maret 2009

How to Diagnose a 2000 Ford E-250 Automatic Transmission

The Ford E-250 is one of the full-sized vans in Ford's E-series line of vehicles. Formerly known as the Econoline series, the Ford E-series features vans for both passenger and cargo use. The 2000 model year E-250 features a 4.2 liter, V6 engine mated to a four-speed automatic transmission with overdrive. If you are experiencing problems with the automatic transmission of your Ford E-250, there are numerous ways to diagnose the issue.

Instructions

    1

    Check the E-250 dashboard for an illuminated "Check Engine" light. Located next to the fuel gauge, the "Check Engine" light is represented by an engine symbol. If the "Check Engine" light is illuminated, plug a diagnostic scanner into the ECU access port, located in the driver's side footwell area. Since the transmission features various electrical monitoring devices, many transmission issues will trigger the "Check Engine" light. Diagnostic scanners give you a readout that displays the error code number, as well as a brief description of the malfunction.

    2

    Park your 2000 E-250 on a flat, solid surface. Use a floor jack to raise the driver's side of the vehicle. As a safety precaution, place jack stands under the vehicle to support the chassis. This gives you room to visually inspect the transmission.

    3

    Get underneath the vehicle and locate the transmission, found about midway along the underside of the vehicle and connected directly to the rear of the engine. Visually inspect the exterior of the transmission for signs of fluid leak. Fluid leaks are most common in areas where the bolts are installed into the transmission, such as the near the drain bolt or along the transmission mounting flange. Low transmission fluid due to leaks creates numerous performance issues, such as gear grinding and harsh shifting characteristics.

    4

    Remove the jack stands from under the vehicle and lower it off of the floor jack. Drive your 2000 E-250 on a public roadway where you can allow it to upshift and downshift multiple times at different speeds.

    5

    Pay attention to any unusual behavior from the transmission while driving. This may include hesitant or harsh gear shifts, improper gear engagement, as well as excessive transmission noise and vibrations. If the gear lever itself feels hesitant, it may be caused by a problem with the shift linkage. More serious transmission issues are likely caused by worn internals, such as damaged gears or a leak in the internal valve system. In this case, the transmission must be removed and either rebuilt or replaced by a professional.

My Sprinter Van Won't Start

Sprinter vans are small, economical versions of the common conversion van used primarily for business purposes, either for transporting goods or materials to and from a worksite or directly to customers. While efficient, Sprinters, just like any other motorized vehicle, are occasionally prone to not starting. If your Sprinter van isn't starting despite your best efforts, chances are culprit is either electrical or mechanical; either way, some DIY solutions exist to help you ascertain and solve the problem.

Instructions

    1

    Make sure the Sprinter is completely turned off and engage the parking brake for safety's sake; you may also want to chock the rear wheels as an extra precaution to keep the van in place. Once you have done this, pop open the hood of the van.

    2

    Sit in the driver's seat (or have a partner do so) and turn the key to engage the ignition; listen for any noises and note what you're both hearing and seeing. If there is a single clicking noise and the headlights won't come on when activated, you either have a dead battery or bad alternator.

    3

    Replace the battery with the exact same model and type as the current battery. These can be purchased at many big-box retail or auto specialty stores. Once you've replaced the battery, try again; if the result is the same, order a new alternator for the model and year of your Sprinter from an auto parts dealer. You should also replace all the spark plugs at once when changing either the battery or alternator to eliminate any problems.

    4

    Turn on the headlights, press down on the brake and turn the ignition. If the lights come on but the engine won't "turn over," chances are the starter has gone bad. You'll need to consult a parts dealer to help you find a compatible replacement starter for the van.

    5

    Turn the engine on once again and listen for the fuel pump to engage inside the gas tank. If you don't hear that audible noise, chances are the fuel pump is spent. Do not attempt to measure fuel pump pressure yourself; consult a knowledgeable mechanic who can diagnose and fix the problem using a threaded gauge that will match your Sprinter's system requirements.

How to Check the Electrical Part of the Fuel Injectors

How to Check the Electrical Part of the Fuel Injectors

Fuel injectors act like electrically controlled firing nozzles that receive a pulse signal to inject and fire a precise amount of fuel into the intake manifold. Multiport fuel injectors deliver individual shots into each cylinder. Fuel injectors can cause a variety of problems, including surging, stalling, misfiring, hesitation, flooding and no-start conditions. The ECM, or engine control module, sends an electronic signal to the fuel injector, which must read and transfer an electrical pulse to ignite the fuel. A vehicle owner can perform a few tests to determine whether the electrical part of the injector is functioning properly.

Instructions

    1

    Apply the emergency brake and set the transmission selector in "Park" for an automatic and neutral for a standard transmission.

    2

    Raise the hood and locate the fuel injector rail, which might be under the raised intake manifold, at the sides of it on a longitudinally mounted engine, or on top of the throttle body.

    3

    Locate the fuel injectors at the manifold location; they appear as small nozzles, with a small wiring jack connected to the top side of the injector.

    4

    Start the vehicle, if it is able to run. Place a stethoscope sensor pad on top of one of the fuel injectors; you should hear a continuous clicking pulse from the injector. This means it is receiving a trigger signal and firing.

    5

    Test each injector with the stethoscope. Mark with a piece of masking tape any injector that does not emit the clicking pulse.

    6

    Remove the electrical connector from the suspect injector by prying the fastener back and pulling the connector straight out. Have an assistant turn the ignition key to the "On" position.

    7

    Hook up the black, ground lead of a multimeter to a ground source and set the meter for DC. Probe both sides (with red lead) of the electrical connector tangs inside the connector; one of them should read 12 volts. No reading will indicate no power source reaching the injector, indicating the problem lies with the ECM, which is triggered (activated by an electrical pulse) by the crank or cam sensor.

    8

    Connect the negative lead of the multimeter to the positive (+) side of the battery. Disconnect the coil wire to the coil pack or disable the ignition fuse -- refer to your owner's repair manual for these component locations.

    9

    Probe the tang on the electrical connector that did not show a 12-volt reading. Have the assistant crank the engine over. Watch the multimeter gauge; the volts should bounce or fluctuate between 0 and 12 volts. A shorted injector will show no voltage pulse bounce. Check all injectors in this fashion.

    10

    Set the multimeter for the lower ohms setting. The vehicle does not have to be running or have the ignition key turned on. Touch the black multimeter lead to one of the connector prongs and the red multimeter lead to the other tang; it makes no difference in which order.

    11

    Read the ohms, which is the resistance. The ohms reading will be model-specific, so refer to your owner's repair manual for the correct ohms reading. Check all fuel injectors in this manner. Any injector that reads "0" ohms, or reads significantly different than the others, has a short and must be replaced.

Kamis, 12 Maret 2009

Cooling Problems With the 1985 Jeep Cherokee

In 1984, Jeep released an all-new compact SUV: the Cherokee. Prior to 1984, Jeep used the Cherokee name as the sporty trim level of the Wagoneer. The 1985 Cherokee had three engines available: a 2.1-liter four-cylinder, a 2.5-liter four-cylinder and a 2.8-liter V-6. All three engines use similar cooling systems and can develop similar problems.

Cooling Fan Problems

    The 1985 Jeep Cherokee uses a flex-blade cooling fan to cool down the coolant in the radiator before the fluid reenters the engine. The fan blades on this type of fan flex as the engine's speed increases, resulting in lowered engine noise and increased engine efficiency.

    This pitch change under high rpm also decreases the airflow created by the fan, as the anticipated movement of the SUV supplies sufficient airflow. If the fan becomes distorted from its constantly changing pitch or impact, you may experience overheating.

    The fan also has a thermostatic clutch that increases and decreases the fan's rotational speed with the engine temperature: As the temperature increases, the clutch tightens and the fan rotates faster; as the engine cools, the clutch loosens to slow the fan's rotation.

Coolant Level

    The 1985 Cherokee requires a 50-50 mixture of ethylene glycol-based (green) antifreeze and clean water to keep the engine cool. The 2.1-liter diesel engine holds 2-1/4 gallons of coolant; the 2.5-liter engine holds up to 2-1/2 gallons of coolant; and the 2.8-liter six-cylinder engine holds up to 3 gallons of coolant.

    When the coolant level is low, it cannot remove heat from the engine at a rate rapid enough to keep the engine within its operating temperature. This will result in the Cherokee's engine overheating. If the coolant is low, there is likely a leak -- internal or external -- and you must perform a leak check on the cooling system.

Thermostat

    Jeep positioned the 1985 Cherokee's thermostat on the front of the engine block, just below the valve cover. The thermostat has a valve that opens and closes to regulate the flow of coolant from the radiator to the engine.

    The thermostat can fail in three ways: stuck closed, stuck open or showing delayed response. If the thermostat sticks closed, the coolant cannot flow into the engine, resulting in your Cherokee overheating. If the thermostat sticks open, the coolant flows unrestricted through the engine and radiator -- this unrestricted flow can result in the SUV over-cooling, which can result in poor engine performance and lack of heat coming from the vents. The final thermostat issue is delayed response. This is when the thermostat does not start opening at 192 degrees F in the four-cylinder engines or 197 degrees F in six-cylinder engines. When this occurs, the engine overheats slightly until the thermostat finally responds by opening up. Once opened, the engine cools off to its correct operating temperature.

Water Pump Failure

    The water pump on the 1985 Cherokee is mounted just behind the cooling fan clutch, attached to the front of the engine block. The serpentine belt on the engine turns the water pump pulley and rotates an impeller inside the water pump. This impeller rotation is what pushes the coolant through the cooling system.

    Over time, or due to lack of maintenance, the water pump bearing or impeller may fail. This prevents the coolant from flowing through the cooling system, resulting in overheating.

Cooling System Blockage

    Jeep recommends draining and refilling the 1985 Cherokee's cooling system every 3 years or 45,000 miles, whichever comes first. If you do not follow this recommendation, the coolant may congeal and cause blockage in the cooling system. This prevents the coolant from flowing correctly, causing overheating.

    The 50-50 mix of antifreeze and coolant in the cooling system helps prevent rust from developing in the system. If you fill the system with just water, it will rust and possibly clog the cooling system, causing overheating.

Rabu, 11 Maret 2009

Signs & Symptoms of an Engine Vacuum Leak

Signs & Symptoms of an Engine Vacuum Leak

For an automobile to operate properly, an adequate amount of vacuum pressure must be present on the air intake side of the engine. This vacuum affects the careful balance of air and fuel that powers the engine. Diagnosing a vacuum leak can be done with a little knowledge of the telltale signs.

Engine Idling to Fast

    If an engine without computerized controls is idling too fast despite your attempts to adjust the carburetor idle screw, or adjust the air-bypass control on a fuel-injected car, there could be an air leak past the throttle. Common leak paths include the carburetor and throttle body gaskets, carburetor insulator spacers and the engine's vacuum fittings, hoses and accessories.

Stalling or Rough Idle

    A serious air leak can alter the air-fuel mixture so that the engine won't idle at all. There are many other engine issues that can cause this problem, such as an EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) valve that is stuck open and an incorrect PCV (positive crankcase ventilation) valve.

Misfiring When Accelerating

    Engine misfiring when the vehicle increases in speed may be the result of a vacuum leak. It could also be a faulty accelerator pump, dirty fuel injectors or even ignition problems.

Finding the Leak

    Visually inspect all the vacuum hoses and connections for cracks or loose fittings. A quicker way to find the leak is to attach a rubber hose to a small bottle of propane. Open the valve so there is a slow steady flow of gas. With the car idling, hold the hose near suspected leaking points and listen for a change in the vehicle's idle. If the propane in sucked into the air intake, you have found your leak.

Selasa, 10 Maret 2009

How to Troubleshoot the Engine Light on a 2005 Chrysler Town & Country

How to Troubleshoot the Engine Light on a 2005 Chrysler Town & Country

Troubleshooting engine problems without help does not have to be time consuming. In much less the time than it takes to manually inspect every engine part, you could have diagnosed and begun fixing the Chrysler's problem. Since 1996, the Chrysler Town & Country has used second-generation On-Board Diagnostic (OBD-II) codes. These codes activate the engine light on your dashboard, and retrieving this information takes only a few minutes, provided that you have a diagnostic scanner fluent in OBD-II coding.

Instructions

    1

    Locate and purchase an OBD scanner. This diagnostic tool can be found at automotive stores, or online. How much you pay for a tool depends on what exactly you want; many tools apply to other diagnostic systems, like ABS brakes. The price can start around $99 and easily go upwards. Also, a variety of software packages are available online to trick a laptop into becoming a diagnostic scanner. However, to do that, you will also need a cable fitted with a data link connection plug at one end, and a USB connector at the other.

    2

    Open the Town & Country driver-side door, and stick the key into the ignition. Leave the vehicle "off" for a moment.

    3

    Locate the data link port beneath your Town & Country dashboard. The black, plastic port features 16 receptor slots to fit a 16-prong plug.

    4

    Fit the OBD-II scanner plug into this outlet.

    5

    Activate the code scanner, if it does not turn on automatically. You can do this by pressing the scanner power button.

    6

    Turn on the Town & Country electrical system. Look for the trouble code on the scanner screen. If nothing appears onscreen, start the engine.

    7

    Wait a few seconds for the trouble codes to appear on the scanner screen.

    8

    Copy the trouble codes onto paper.

    9

    Reference the trouble codes in the scanner manual. If the manual does not contain these codes, then try to find them using a search engine on your computer. Definitions appear on the first page of results, and this information will help you decide between a do-it-yourself fix, or paying a professional mechanic.

Senin, 09 Maret 2009

The Effects of a Clogged Fuel Filter in a Durango

The Dodge Durango is a vehicle that has had several recalls from the manufacturer as well as probes conducted on the automobile from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The automobile has been recalled for suspension problems, wiring harness problems, fuel leak problems and, more recently, an investigation has begun on the vehicle for fires that have started under the drivers seat. The Durango has not been recalled for any fuel filter problems, but a clogged fuel filter does effect the operation of the engine.

Stalling at High Speeds

    One of the effects of a clogged fuel filter in the Durango is the automobile will stall at high speeds. The fuel filter prevents debris from entering the fuel line, carburetor and fuel injector damaging these parts. When the Durango owner accelerates the vehicle, a clogged filter prevents a sufficient amount of fuel to enter the engine preventing the Durango from speeding up when necessary such as entering the highway. The engine stalls and the Durango slows down or dies when accelerating.

Engine Won't Start

    A completely clogged fuel filter on the Durango will prevent the engine from starting because no fuel is getting to the fuel injector or carburetor in order to fire the engine or start-up the engine. The Durango will turnover, but does not start because the fuel is being blocked by the clogged fuel filter. This is a sure sign that the fuel filter needs to be replaced. Too prevent the fuel filter from completely clogged it is recommended by service technicians that the fuel filter be replaced every 20,000 miles, but on the newer Durangos, the fuel filter is located inside the gas tank which allows the fuel filter to last much longer.

Rough Idle

    The Durango will run rough when idling if the fuel filter is partially clogged. This causes the engine to work harder to keep running and the engine will cough or sputter. Any time the engine has to work harder to operate, damage can be done to the main components such as the pistons and cylinders. Even the spark plugs can be damaged if the fuel filter is clogged in the Durango. When these components become damaged, the replacement can become very expensive. A trained mechanic can easily determine if the fuel filter is becoming clogged by just looking at the spark plugs and seeing how much wear is visible.

How to Diagnose Front Seal Problems With Automatic Transmissions

How to Diagnose Front Seal Problems With Automatic Transmissions

Automatic transmission front seal problems cause low transmission fluid levels within the automatic transmission. The front seal keeps transmission fluid from leaking out where the torque converter mounts to the transmission case. The front seal is usually made of rubber, much like the rubber in a windshield wiper blade. Certain signs will tell you whether the transmission is in need of repair.

Instructions

    1

    Check the transmission fluid level often. The dipstick for the transmission is usually located in the engine compartment toward the firewall. Check the level while the car is warmed up and on a flat surface. If the level falls within days of receiving new fluid, there is a leak, and it is likely to be in the front seal.

    2

    Place a drop of the liquid on a paper towel and watch it for 30 seconds. If the fluid spreads widely and is red or light brown in color, the transmission fluid is healthy. If it doesn't spread or is dark in color, the automatic transmission fluid should be changed.

    3

    Look for spots of red colored liquid under the car. Transmission fluid looks like cherry syrup.

    4

    Take the car for a drive and watch for a change in behavior. Automatic transmission fluid is more viscous when cold. If the car drives well when it's cold, but changes when it's warm, the transmission fluid is low.

    5

    Examine the behavior of the car. If it won't stay in drive, won't move from a standstill without jerking, or shifts slowly or vaguely, the fluid level is low.

Minggu, 08 Maret 2009

The Seat in My S-10 Pickup Won't Work

Chevrolet's S-10 pickup was sold with manual seats. There was no automatic function, nor heated seats and seatbacks. Seats were either individual bucket seats or configured as a 60/40 bench. In both cases, the seat backs had reclining functionality. Some variants included a manual lumbar support. The extended cab models also featured an easy entry seat for accessing the rear, and a small jump seat in the rear. Problems with getting the seats to work can be fixed by following some simple steps.

Instructions

    1

    Sit in the front seat and pull up on the lever under the seat to unlock it and then slide the seat backwards and forwards. Use leverage from your feet on the floor to push the seat backwards, and lift yourself up a little to move the seat forwards if the seat is sticky. Look for items obstructing the movement if you continue to have problems.

    2

    Lift the lever on the outer side of the bucket seats or bench to adjust the front seatback. If the seatback won't go back, look for obstructions and remove them. Let go of the lever to lock it in the position you want once you've got it working.

    3

    Lock the easy entry seat if it continues to move. After you've used it, push rearwards to be sure it's locked.

    4

    Pull the handle of the bottom of the jump seat until the seat is in place, then move the seatback to the vertical position if the jump seat won't work.